Posts tagged zimbabwe

Photo: Mary Marizani and her family.   Zimbabwe 2012 © MSF
First Patient Cured of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Epworth, Zimbabwe
In her home on the outskirts of Zimbabwe’s capital city, 48-year-old Mary Marizani says that, although she recently became the first MSF patient in the country to conquer multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), she now faces another challenge: “I have my appetite back and now I am eating everything in sight.”

Photo: Mary Marizani and her family.   Zimbabwe 2012 © MSF

First Patient Cured of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Epworth, Zimbabwe

In her home on the outskirts of Zimbabwe’s capital city, 48-year-old Mary Marizani says that, although she recently became the first MSF patient in the country to conquer multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), she now faces another challenge: “I have my appetite back and now I am eating everything in sight.”

As part of our Donor Voices project, our doctors and nurses in Zimbabwe will take over our @MSF_UK account on Twitter to ask why you give to MSF. Tune in this Friday at 11am BST to share your reasons.

As part of our Donor Voices project, our doctors and nurses in Zimbabwe will take over our @MSF_UK account on Twitter to ask why you give to MSF. Tune in this Friday at 11am BST to share your reasons.

Earlier this week, we introduced you to Mqondisi, the 17-year-old boy from Zimbabwe who is living with HIV. Today, he marched with MSF to the White House in Washington D.C. calling on pharma and the U.S. government to stop undercutting affordable medicines so that we can scale up HIV treatment and stop the virus.

Earlier this week, we introduced you to Mqondisi, the 17-year-old boy from Zimbabwe who is living with HIV.
Today, he marched with MSF to the White House in Washington D.C.
calling on pharma and the U.S. government to stop undercutting affordable medicines so that we can scale up HIV treatment and stop the virus.

On World Aids Day, MSF launched "Positive Generation: Voices for an AIDS free-future" - a collaborative project based on songs from HIV support groups in Zimbabwe mixed with the voices of international artists who have volunteered their talents and support.

This project aims to raise awareness about the reality of HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa, which has two sides: people can live highly positive lives with HIV/AIDS treatment, which can also prevent further transmission of the virus; but shortfalls in funding for HIV programs in developing countries threaten the recent progress made in the fight against the virus putting the lives of thousands of people at risk.

The ‘Positive Generation’ project includes a CD, book, documentary, and a website. This preview shows how MSF uses music to pass important messages about the virus in Zimbabwe, to explain to patients that they are not alone, that treatment can stabilize the illness, and that the stigma must be broken.

MSF chooses to concentrate the majority of resources on treatment, because that’s what doctors do best – that’s what we’re here for. So zero AIDS related deaths in Zimbabwe means that, by direct intervention or by advocacy or by system support, we have to double the number of people living with HIV on treatment – and then double the number again. Today there are around 300,000 people in Zimbabwe on treatment and around 1,200,000 people living with HIV, all of whom will eventually need the best treatment available if we’re going to prevent them from dying of AIDS. That’s quite a tough challenge.

- Paul Foreman, MSF head of mission in Zimbabwe

Read more of his blog post for World AIDS Day.

We know for a fact that there will be additional epidemics in the near future. It would simply not be right to wait for them to occur. We need an effective system to anticipate and prepare for the coming outbreaks.

Florence Fermon, MSF’s vaccination coordinator on the increasing number of measles epidemics.

On September 13-14, 2011, the Measles Initiative met in Washington, D.C., bringing together organizations seeking to eliminate measles worldwide. Given the troubling resurgence of measles epidemics over the last three years, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is calling for an effective outbreak response mechanism to be established immediately, with secure financial and technical resources.

Since 2008, MSF has responded to epidemics that have expanded over time. In 2010, for example, more than 4.5 million children were vaccinated in emergencies in many countries, including Chad, Malawi, South Africa, Yemen and Zimbabwe. This year, medical teams in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) vaccinated three million children, but could not halt the epidemic. Despite data showing the urgent need for action, actors in the field were slow to organize. The DRC is no exception. Most countries that experience these epidemics do not adequately mobilize the resources available to them and organize vaccination campaigns.

Read more here about what MSF is calling for to ease the outbreaks.

2008Fighting Cholera in Zimbabwe

After an cholera outbreak starts in August, MSF treats more than 65,000 people suffering from the disease over the next 10 months while also supporting government-run facilities with supplies, staff incentive payments, and treatment programs.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Zimbabwe 2008 © Joanna Stravropoulou

2008
Fighting Cholera in Zimbabwe

After an cholera outbreak starts in August, MSF treats more than 65,000 people suffering from the disease over the next 10 months while also supporting government-run facilities with supplies, staff incentive payments, and treatment programs.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Zimbabwe 2008 © Joanna Stravropoulou

2008Xenophobic Violence Uproots Tens of Thousands in South Africa

MSF provides medical assistance to thousands of Zimbabweans and other foreign African nationals when angry gangs attack them, killing 62 people and sending 100,000 more in search of safety. MSF speaks out against the inadequate response of both the South African government and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: South Africa 2008 © Erin Trieb

2008
Xenophobic Violence Uproots Tens of Thousands in South Africa

MSF provides medical assistance to thousands of Zimbabweans and other foreign African nationals when angry gangs attack them, killing 62 people and sending 100,000 more in search of safety. MSF speaks out against the inadequate response of both the South African government and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: South Africa 2008 © Erin Trieb

MSF Field Blog: Outreach at the Gweru Agricultural Show

Another fantastic blog post from MSF’s Jess in Zimbabwe.

A Vulnerable Existence: Migrants in South Africa

I’m afraid of the xenophobia everybody says is coming after the World Cup.

31-year-old Zimbabwean man living in Johannesburg

The Lives of Survival Migrants and Refugees in South Africa

A group of people burst into the house, breaking the door. They asked me to show them my South African ID, and when I said I didn’t have any, they started to beat me with sticks, stones, punches, kicks. I managed to escape from the house and started to run along the road, but they didn’t stop. They started to follow me with the car and let me run for a while. They caught me again and beat me up until I was lying on the ground covered in blood. They left me there because they thought I was dead. After a while I tried to move and with difficulty reached a phone box and called an ambulance. The ambulance didn’t arrive. Three people stopped their car when they saw me lying on the ground, carried me into their car and brought me to the hospital. This is not the first time. Last year, six people beat me up, but it wasn’t like now – this time they wanted to kill me.

20-year-old Zimbabwean man in Westernburg, Polokwane

The Lives of Survival Migrants and Refugees in South Africa

A security force known as the Red Ants violently removed the inhabitants and threw people’s belongings out doors and windows.
© Sara Hjalmarson

The Lives of Survival Migrants and Refugees in South Africa

A security force known as the Red Ants violently removed the inhabitants and threw people’s belongings out doors and windows.
© Sara Hjalmarson

The Lives of Survival Migrants and Refugees in South Africa

In February, more than 1,000 people were evicted from one building in Johannesburg, kicked out onto the street with nowhere to go.
© Ntando Ncube

The Lives of Survival Migrants and Refugees in South Africa

In February, more than 1,000 people were evicted from one building in Johannesburg, kicked out onto the street with nowhere to go.
© Ntando Ncube

The Lives of Survival Migrants and Refugees in South Africa

People living in these derelict buildings often lack basic supplies such as water, sanitation, or electricity, as well as safety. Thousands have been evicted four times in the last nine months.
© Finbarr O’Reilly/REUTERS

The Lives of Survival Migrants and Refugees in South Africa

People living in these derelict buildings often lack basic supplies such as water, sanitation, or electricity, as well as safety. Thousands have been evicted four times in the last nine months.
© Finbarr O’Reilly/REUTERS

The Lives of Survival Migrants and Refugees in South Africa