Posts tagged who

Photo:This nine-month-old baby was recently diagnosed with MDR-TB. There is no guidance from the World Health Organization on the best way to treat children with drug-resistant TB. Nurses have to cut adult-formulation pills, which is imprecise and creates a greater risk of over- or under-dosing the child. Kyrgyzstan 2013 © Vincent Tremeau
Surviving Two Years of Treatment for Drug-Resistant TB in Kyrgyzstan
MSF works in the penitentiary and civilian sectors in Kyrgyzstan offering treatment for multi-drug resistant TB. In February 2012, MSF began offering comprehensive medical care for people with drug-resistant TB and people co-infected with HIV and TB in the district of Kara-Suu, southwestern Kyrgyzstan, where the rates of drug-resistant strains of TB are particularly high. Teams also offer psycho-social support to encourage adherence to the arduous two-year treatment program. While the team has helped renovate the TB hospital in Kara Suu to improve infection control, the aim is to enable patients to be treated on an outpatient basis, at clinics closer to home.

Photo:This nine-month-old baby was recently diagnosed with MDR-TB. There is no guidance from the World Health Organization on the best way to treat children with drug-resistant TB. Nurses have to cut adult-formulation pills, which is imprecise and creates a greater risk of over- or under-dosing the child. Kyrgyzstan 2013 © Vincent Tremeau

Surviving Two Years of Treatment for Drug-Resistant TB in Kyrgyzstan

MSF works in the penitentiary and civilian sectors in Kyrgyzstan offering treatment for multi-drug resistant TB. In February 2012, MSF began offering comprehensive medical care for people with drug-resistant TB and people co-infected with HIV and TB in the district of Kara-Suu, southwestern Kyrgyzstan, where the rates of drug-resistant strains of TB are particularly high. Teams also offer psycho-social support to encourage adherence to the arduous two-year treatment program. While the team has helped renovate the TB hospital in Kara Suu to improve infection control, the aim is to enable patients to be treated on an outpatient basis, at clinics closer to home.

Photo: Young MDR-TB patients in Blue House, a facility in Nairobi where MSF treats TB and HIV. Kenya 2011 © Yann Libessart
New MSF Multinational Study of Pediatric TB/HIV Co-Infection Confirms Crisis of Undiagnosed TB Among Children
Data from the largest-ever multinational cohort of children infected with both tuberculosis (TB) and HIV, released by MSF, definitively shows that there is an urgent need for better TB tests for children. The standard TB test fails to detect the disease in children 93% of the time. 
“When you’re only detecting TB in one out of ten children, you can be sure that many are falling through the cracks simply because they’re not being diagnosed, resulting in unnecessary deaths and the disease spreading to others,” said Dr. Philipp du Cros, head of MSF’s medical department in London. “Most revealing of this sad reality is that until just last month, there was little data on the global burden of pediatric TB.”
One of the main barriers to developing a TB test that works in children has been the lack of a gold standard to assess performance of new diagnostic tools. In a process led by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), a consensus on clinical case definition and methodological approaches to apply in the evaluation of new TB diagnostic tests in children was developed. This consensus should open the way for academic groups and test developers to work towards better TB tests for kids.
“What we need to see now is test developers showing that children are a priority, and that will mean developing tests that respond to their needs,” said Dr. Grania Brigden, TB Advisor for MSF’s Access Campaign. “We need to move away from having to put children through excruciating procedures to get lab specimens that in the end don’t provide us with a diagnosis.” 

Photo: Young MDR-TB patients in Blue House, a facility in Nairobi where MSF treats TB and HIV. Kenya 2011 © Yann Libessart

New MSF Multinational Study of Pediatric TB/HIV Co-Infection Confirms Crisis of Undiagnosed TB Among Children


Data from the largest-ever multinational cohort of children infected with both tuberculosis (TB) and HIV, released by MSF, definitively shows that there is an urgent need for better TB tests for children. The standard TB test fails to detect the disease in children 93% of the time. 

“When you’re only detecting TB in one out of ten children, you can be sure that many are falling through the cracks simply because they’re not being diagnosed, resulting in unnecessary deaths and the disease spreading to others,” said Dr. Philipp du Cros, head of MSF’s medical department in London. “Most revealing of this sad reality is that until just last month, there was little data on the global burden of pediatric TB.”

One of the main barriers to developing a TB test that works in children has been the lack of a gold standard to assess performance of new diagnostic tools. In a process led by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), a consensus on clinical case definition and methodological approaches to apply in the evaluation of new TB diagnostic tests in children was developed. This consensus should open the way for academic groups and test developers to work towards better TB tests for kids.

“What we need to see now is test developers showing that children are a priority, and that will mean developing tests that respond to their needs,” said Dr. Grania Brigden, TB Advisor for MSF’s Access Campaign. “We need to move away from having to put children through excruciating procedures to get lab specimens that in the end don’t provide us with a diagnosis.” 

Malaria: Offering Children a Chance

For the first time, MSF is employing seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) in Chad and Mali. 170,000 children aged between three months and five years received anti-malaria medicines during the peak transmission season. This treatment, recommended by the World Health Organization, will not eradicate malaria definitively. But in countries like Chad and Mali, where malaria is the first cause of infant and child mortality, it does have an important role to play in emergency situations.

Better Treatment for HIV-Positive Pregnant Women

The World Health Organization recently issued new guidelines to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. The recommendations include getting more women on treatment sooner and staying on it for life. The guidelines have the support of Doctors Without Borders.

Read more on this article from Voice of America.


Photo: MSF / Brendan Bannon
MSF HIV specialist Dr. Eamonn Vitt examines an HIV positive Ugandan woman who’s 7 months pregnant. (Nov. 2009)

Better Treatment for HIV-Positive Pregnant Women

The World Health Organization recently issued new guidelines to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. The recommendations include getting more women on treatment sooner and staying on it for life. The guidelines have the support of Doctors Without Borders. Read more on this article from Voice of America. Photo: MSF / Brendan Bannon
MSF HIV specialist Dr. Eamonn Vitt examines an HIV positive Ugandan woman who’s 7 months pregnant. (Nov. 2009)

Malawi has proposed adopting early treatment, changing first-line treatment and implementing the new treatment protocol for HIV-positive pregnant and/or nursing women participating in prevention of mother-to-child transmission programs (PMTCT). If implemented, these changes could have a very positive impact on patient health and could increase the possibility of expanding HIV/AIDS treatment overall.
Martha Huckabee, MSF’s head of mission in Malawi from June 2009 to December 2010, commenting on new directives from the World Health Organization (WHO) regarding treatments for HIV/AIDS patients.
It is undeniable that tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS are more prevalent than reported figures would suggest and the Turkmen government is refusing to acknowledge this reality.
International organizations in the country, such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF, are perpetuating these problems by giving a veneer of legitimacy to misinformation from the government and to practices that are not only ineffective but often dangerous.

Dr. Leslie Shanks, MSF’s medical director, in a special report addressing key issues in Turkmenistan’s health care system and to raise concerns about the role of international actors in the country.