Posts tagged water

Photo by Kristine Langelund/MSF
In the Philippines: “I asked children to draw a picture of their community before and after the typhoon, and another as they would like it to be when it has been rebuilt. Then we make the paper into a boat and set it out to sail on the sea with a wish…Where I am from in Brazil, this is something that we do at this time of year, hoping that the New Year will bring good things to everyone.” -Ana Cecilia Weintraub, MSF psychologist Read more: http://bit.ly/1i4GtqB

Photo by Kristine Langelund/MSF

In the Philippines: “I asked children to draw a picture of their community before and after the typhoon, and another as they would like it to be when it has been rebuilt. Then we make the paper into a boat and set it out to sail on the sea with a wish…Where I am from in Brazil, this is something that we do at this time of year, hoping that the New Year will bring good things to everyone.” -Ana Cecilia Weintraub, MSF psychologist 
Read more: http://bit.ly/1i4GtqB

"The journey is stunning…with the rains come lush green countryside, spontaneous lakes and beautiful migrating birds. And a hair-raising ride in a narrow boat loaded with all our malaria drugs and kits. The road is somewhere under several feet of water." —An epidemiologist helps fight a dangerous and unexpected malaria outbreak in Chad.

"The journey is stunning…with the rains come lush green countryside, spontaneous lakes and beautiful migrating birds. And a hair-raising ride in a narrow boat loaded with all our malaria drugs and kits. The road is somewhere under several feet of water." —An epidemiologist helps fight a dangerous and unexpected malaria outbreak in Chad.

Photo: A child is measured with a middle upper arm circumference band by MSF health staff in order to check for malnutrition at a mobile health clinic and ambulatory therapeutic feeding clinic in Dera Murad Jamali. Pakistan 2012 © Fathema Murtaza/MSF
MSF Responds to Post-Flood Needs in Pakistan
The needs become apparent as heavy monsoon rains flooded the town of Dera Murad Jumali and surrounding areas, forcing thousands of families to abandon their homes and seek shelter on the sides of roads in makeshift tents. In response, MSF’s team in Dera Murad Jamali is now supplying water to 20 water tanks and two 15 cubic meter water bladders to ensure that there is safe drinking water for thousands of people who otherwise cannot access it. MSF is providing more than 650,000 liters of clean drinking water to the displaced people every day.

Photo: A child is measured with a middle upper arm circumference band by MSF health staff in order to check for malnutrition at a mobile health clinic and ambulatory therapeutic feeding clinic in Dera Murad Jamali. Pakistan 2012 © Fathema Murtaza/MSF

MSF Responds to Post-Flood Needs in Pakistan

The needs become apparent as heavy monsoon rains flooded the town of Dera Murad Jumali and surrounding areas, forcing thousands of families to abandon their homes and seek shelter on the sides of roads in makeshift tents. In response, MSF’s team in Dera Murad Jamali is now supplying water to 20 water tanks and two 15 cubic meter water bladders to ensure that there is safe drinking water for thousands of people who otherwise cannot access it. MSF is providing more than 650,000 liters of clean drinking water to the displaced people every day.

Photo: Due to living conditions for earthquake survivors and the general population that help enable the spread of cholera in Haiti, the disease remains a lethal threat two years after the epidemic first appeared in the county. Haiti 2012 © Mathieu Fortoul/MSF
For Haitians, Cholera Remains a Major Public Health Problem
It’s been two years since a cholera epidemic first swept through Haiti, infecting hundreds of thousands of people who’d never before encountered the disease. It was clear that cholera was likely to be a recurring issue in Haiti, but even today, new patients cannot be certain that they will get the treatment they need, and little has been done to improve the environmental conditions that enable the continued spread of the disease.
MSF has treated 12,000 cholera patients in five cholera treatment centers since the beginning of the year. During the recent spike of new cases in May, MSF treated more than 70 percent of the total number of patients registered in Port-au-Prince. 

Photo: Due to living conditions for earthquake survivors and the general population that help enable the spread of cholera in Haiti, the disease remains a lethal threat two years after the epidemic first appeared in the county. Haiti 2012 © Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

For Haitians, Cholera Remains a Major Public Health Problem

It’s been two years since a cholera epidemic first swept through Haiti, infecting hundreds of thousands of people who’d never before encountered the disease. It was clear that cholera was likely to be a recurring issue in Haiti, but even today, new patients cannot be certain that they will get the treatment they need, and little has been done to improve the environmental conditions that enable the continued spread of the disease.

MSF has treated 12,000 cholera patients in five cholera treatment centers since the beginning of the year. During the recent spike of new cases in May, MSF treated more than 70 percent of the total number of patients registered in Port-au-Prince. 

Photo: The emergency department of the District Headquarters Hospital in Timergara. Pakistan 2012 © P.K. Lee/MSF 
MSF Works to Stop Spread of Post-Monsoon Ailments in Pakistan
A monsoon in Pakistan caused an increase in waterborne disease cases due to unclean drinking water, poor sanitation, and poor hygiene conditions. We’ve set up temporary centers and 2,840 patients have received treatment since July.
“Although acute watery diarrhea is an easily treatable disease,” says MSF medical coordinator Dr. Jacob Maikere, “it can spread quickly, so prevention is as important as treatment. Access to improved sanitation facilities and clean water are vital [in order] to mitigate the spread of waterborne diseases like this.”

Photo: The emergency department of the District Headquarters Hospital in Timergara. Pakistan 2012 © P.K. Lee/MSF

MSF Works to Stop Spread of Post-Monsoon Ailments in Pakistan

A monsoon in Pakistan caused an increase in waterborne disease cases due to unclean drinking water, poor sanitation, and poor hygiene conditions. We’ve set up temporary centers and 2,840 patients have received treatment since July.

“Although acute watery diarrhea is an easily treatable disease,” says MSF medical coordinator Dr. Jacob Maikere, “it can spread quickly, so prevention is as important as treatment. Access to improved sanitation facilities and clean water are vital [in order] to mitigate the spread of waterborne diseases like this.”


On Thursday we rose with the sun and headed out to the surface water treatment site to see if we could get the system to produce clean water. A day earlier, the pumps at the Bamtiko borehole — the main source of water for Jamam refugee camp — had failed. The NGO that was responsible for water supply in the camp had made an urgent request to MSF to set up emergency water treatment capacity. Waterborne disease had always been one of the primary threats for the refugee population in this place, but with hepatitis E now also spreading in the camp, ensuring safe water supply was more critical than ever. MSF agreed to do what we could to fill the gap.
Imran is a water and sanitation engineer with MSF. Read Imran’s latest blog post from Jamam refugee camp in South Sudan to find out how he fixed the main water supply. Please leave your questions and comments for Imran in the comments box below his blog post. 
But then we hear a message on the radio. Rink, one of our star Water/Sanitation guys has gone up to K18 to check that the water supply can be reactivated. He’s discovered about 100 families that must have arrived in recent days from the border. He asks for medical support and Erna, our top medic that has been here since the start of this refugee crisis, from the initial discovery of weak, exhausted refugees that were beyond medical care to the erection of a clinic at K18 to the transfer of all refugees to T3 and finally Batil, grabs her kit and jumps in a car, cancelling the first day off she’s had in a month.
Ruby Siddiqui is an MSF epidemiologist currently working on the refugee crisis in South Sudan.

Read more about the situation on her blog.
“These people have fled terrible violence in Sudan and lost family members during their arduous journeys for safety, and now they are sitting exposed in refugee camps on a flood plain and dying from preventable diseases due to horrific living conditions,” said Tara Newell, MSF emergency coordinator in Jamam. 

Photo:Children wade through the water and mud at Jamam refugee camp, where heavy rains and flooding have worsened what was already a dire lack of potable, clean water.
South Sudan 2012 © Shannon Jensen

These people have fled terrible violence in Sudan and lost family members during their arduous journeys for safety, and now they are sitting exposed in refugee camps on a flood plain and dying from preventable diseases due to horrific living conditions,” said Tara Newell, MSF emergency coordinator in Jamam. Photo:Children wade through the water and mud at Jamam refugee camp, where heavy rains and flooding have worsened what was already a dire lack of potable, clean water.

South Sudan 2012 © Shannon Jensen

More than 100,000 refugees are struggling to survive in South Sudan, where infrastructure, health care resources, and water capacity are extremely limited. Doctors Without Borders is providing assistance in the area and urging other agencies to step up their response to the crisis. (Photo: 2012 © Shannon Jensen)

More than 100,000 refugees are struggling to survive in South Sudan, where infrastructure, health care resources, and water capacity are extremely limited. Doctors Without Borders is providing assistance in the area and urging other agencies to step up their response to the crisis.

(Photo: 2012 © Shannon Jensen)

We could continue treating children suffering from diarrhea induced malnutrition, or we could choose to treat the diarrhea at the community level before the child became malnourished.  The answer seemed obvious – and Project ORS (Oral Rehydration Salts) was conceived.
Trish is working for MSF as a community outreach nurse in Chad. On her blog she describes her experiences during Chad’s “Cholera Season.”
Rains Threaten to Worsen Already Dire Situation for More Than 100,000 Refugees in South Sudan

In Maban County, rains slowed the planned relocation of approximately 12,000 refugees from a transit site known as “KM18” to the Jamam transit camp and then onwards to Batil camp. “They need to get down to Jamam before the roads get completely closed with the rain,” said MSF health advisor Lauren Cooney.Resources—water in particular—are stretched extremely thin in all locations, but KM18 is of particular concern because its water supply is dwindling faster than refugees can be relocated.

Doctors Without Borders is assisting refugees in several locations in the area and is finalizing the establishment of its third field hospital in the camps—this one in Batil—in the coming days.Photo: Halima Atayp of Jam village has been walking for 20 days with her seven-month-old baby and extended family.

South Sudan 2012 © Shannon Jensen

Rains Threaten to Worsen Already Dire Situation for More Than 100,000 Refugees in South Sudan

In Maban County, rains slowed the planned relocation of approximately 12,000 refugees from a transit site known as “KM18” to the Jamam transit camp and then onwards to Batil camp. “They need to get down to Jamam before the roads get completely closed with the rain,” said MSF health advisor Lauren Cooney.

Resources—water in particular—are stretched extremely thin in all locations, but KM18 is of particular concern because its water supply is dwindling faster than refugees can be relocated.

Doctors Without Borders is assisting refugees in several locations in the area and is finalizing the establishment of its third field hospital in the camps—this one in Batil—in the coming days.

Photo: Halima Atayp of Jam village has been walking for 20 days with her seven-month-old baby and extended family.

South Sudan 2012 © Shannon Jensen

Tens of thousands of refugees fleeing fighting in Sudan are continuing to face a full-blown humanitarian crisis, with people dying from a lack of water, adequate medical care, and shelter as they seek refuge in already-overcrowded camps.

Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Sally McMillen/MSF

Tens of thousands of refugees fleeing fighting in Sudan are continuing to face a full-blown humanitarian crisis, with people dying from a lack of water, adequate medical care, and shelter as they seek refuge in already-overcrowded camps.

Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Sally McMillen/MSF

Watch This 2 Minute Video Regarding Scarce Water and Aid for 100,000 Refugees in South Sudan

MSF will be able to supply Sudanese refugees at one camp with two and a half liters of water per person per day, as of next week - about a sixth of the amount of water they need. The minimum amount of water that should be allocated in refugee emergencies is 15 liters per person per day, with seven liters as the minimum “survival allocation”, according to the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Refugees.

Those refugees who fled the fighting in Sudan with little but the clothes on their backs need more humanitarian organizations to step up and provide assistance.

And the situation here is desperate. The water is running out, and when it’s gone, that’s it—you’re going to have 35,000 people without water. People are right on the borderline now. We’ve managed to provide 2.5 liters (a little over half a gallon) per person yesterday and we’re hoping to get that up to 3 liters today, but that’s nowhere near enough, and the pond where we are treating and distributing water is running out.
Nurse Chiara Burzio is working at the Doctors Without Borders field hospital in Jamam refugee camp in Maban County, Upper Nile State, South Sudan.
“There are solutions for all these problems. It’s just that more needs to be done—fast”

“…And the situation here is desperate. The water is running out, and when it’s gone, that’s it—you’re going to have 35,000 people without water. People are right on the borderline now. We’ve managed to provide 2.5 liters (a little over half a gallon) per person yesterday and we’re hoping to get that up to 3 liters today, but that’s nowhere near enough, and the pond where we are treating and distributing water is running out. Without water, or even with a reduced amount of water, people are going to be in trouble. They need help.”

—Nurse Chiara Burzio is working at the MSF field hospital in Jamam refugee camp in Maban County, Upper Nile State, South Sudan.Photo:Refugees from Sudan have entered South Sudan’s Upper Nile State by the tens of thousands. Refugee camp sites are packed and water supplies are dwindling.
South Sudan 2012 © Hereward Holland

“There are solutions for all these problems. It’s just that more needs to be done—fast”

“…And the situation here is desperate. The water is running out, and when it’s gone, that’s it—you’re going to have 35,000 people without water.

People are right on the borderline now. We’ve managed to provide 2.5 liters (a little over half a gallon) per person yesterday and we’re hoping to get that up to 3 liters today, but that’s nowhere near enough, and the pond where we are treating and distributing water is running out. Without water, or even with a reduced amount of water, people are going to be in trouble. They need help.

—Nurse Chiara Burzio is working at the MSF field hospital in Jamam refugee camp in Maban County, Upper Nile State, South Sudan.

Photo:Refugees from Sudan have entered South Sudan’s Upper Nile State by the tens of thousands. Refugee camp sites are packed and water supplies are dwindling.

South Sudan 2012 © Hereward Holland