Posts tagged video

"The experience changed me completely; my innocence died there." Twenty years ago, Rachel Kiddell-Monroe was head of mission in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) during and after the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Here she talks about MSF’s response during the genocide and how the aid response and success in Rwanda should serve as a model for DRC’s North Kivu Province just over the border. 

Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions
10-year-old Nokubegha is battling drug-resistant TB in Swaziland. He is featured in the FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, airing on PBS Tuesday, March 25. See the trailer: http://bit.ly/1d4KLzi 

Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

10-year-old Nokubegha is battling drug-resistant TB in Swaziland. He is featured in the FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, airing on PBS Tuesday, March 25. See the trailer: http://bit.ly/1d4KLzi 

Thank you for support in 2013. Our medical teams were challenged by crises all over the world last year. Watch this short video to see what your support allowed us to do.

Tracey Hansel, a U.S. doctor, just returned from her first assignment with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), at Drouillard hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Part of her time was spent in the hospital’s burn unit, the only free burn care available in the country. She spoke about the one of the best moments of her months there.

Peter has grown up as a refugee - he first fled Sudan for Ethiopia when he was a child. Today, he lives in a refugee camp in South Sudan where he works for Doctors Without Borders as a translator. He does not believe his dreams will ever be realized, but he has hope for the next generation.

Historic Opportunity to Tackle Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis at Risk
People Living with MDR-TB and Health Care Providers Call for Urgent Action

Two new drugs effective against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) must be introduced to improve treatment regimens in countries with a high burden of the devastating disease, a group of people living with MDR-TB and the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) announced in a public manifesto issued today.

Afghanistan: Mobile Care in Kabul

The population of Kabul has tripled over the last 10 years. Some people arrive after fleeing conflict-torn areas for the relative safety of the capital, while others, pushed by poverty, are simply trying to make a living. Returnees from Pakistan and other provinces of Afghanistan have also made their way back to the city. For those living in makeshift settlements and camps, the harsh winter makes an already difficult situation even harder. In January 2013, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) started running mobile clinics and nutritional screenings in six locations where hundreds of Afghans have settled.

CLICK to explore this interactive image: A guide to Syria two years after the conflict began

After two years of extremely violent conflict, the humanitarian situation in Syria is now catastrophic. View and share our interactive image to hear from our patients, see videos and photos and to meet MSF staff.

"A Humiliating Situation," Syrian Refugees in Lebanon from Doctors Without Borders/MSF-USA on Vimeo.

"A Humiliating Situation": Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

Meet some of the more than 120,000 Syrian refugees living in the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon while their country is at war. Families are living in camps, unfinished houses, and abandoned buildings; most are not getting adequate aid.

Afghanistan: A Hospital in Helmand

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is supporting the regional Boost Hospital in Lashkargah, the capital of Afghanistan’s Helmand Province. Our aim is to provide free, life-saving medical care in all areas, including maternity, pediatrics, surgery and emergency room service.

MSF Field Report: Decreasing Child Mortality in South Sudan“How Did You Know We Were Here?”
The refugees wanted to know Dr. Jacoby’s story. They wanted to know where she was from, why MSF had come, and how did MSF even know they were there? Dr. Jacoby showed them the video that convinced her to go to Batil. It mad a major impact on them to realize that we were documenting their situation, and sharing it—“and that this information was enough to get people like me to come to Batil,” says Dr. Jacoby.
“I think that is really powerful. I think that knowing someone on the other side of the world saw what they’re up against, and cares enough to come, really helps people.”

MSF Field Report: Decreasing Child Mortality in South Sudan
“How Did You Know We Were Here?”


The refugees wanted to know Dr. Jacoby’s story. They wanted to know where she was from, why MSF had come, and how did MSF even know they were there? 

Dr. Jacoby showed them the video that convinced her to go to Batil. It mad a major impact on them to realize that we were documenting their situation, and sharing it—“and that this information was enough to get people like me to come to Batil,” says Dr. Jacoby.

“I think that is really powerful. I think that knowing someone on the other side of the world saw what they’re up against, and cares enough to come, really helps people.”

MSF.TV - Delivering Aid in Armed Conflicts.

When working in war-torn areas, it’s often challenging to differentiate military aid and humanitarian aid. Intentions are blurred as military groups provide food and clinics for their own political gain. Where do armies end, and humanitarians begin? Watch this thought-provoking animated video to see how MSF is able to support clinics in warzones while remaining weapons-free.

South Sudan: Time Is Running Out

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is working in Doro and Jamam refugee camps in South Sudan. About 80,000 refugees have fled to the camps to escape ongoing violence in Blue Nile state, and MSF—working against the clock—is trying to help as many as possible before seasonal rains at the end of the month make the area inaccessible. Dr. Kirrily de Polnay talks about her work in the camps and warns that aid organizations need to urgently accelerate their activities if disaster is to be avoided

Phumeza is an XDR-TB patient and a blogger for the TB&ME project. This is her first video blog from her home at a TB patient facility in South Africa. Read Phumeza’s TB&ME blog here.

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patient and TB&ME blogger Athong talks from India about the stigma he faces living with the disease. Read Athong’s TB&ME blog here.