Posts tagged tuberculosis

Phumeza is advocating for better diagnosis & treatment for people with drug-resistant TB in every part of the world. Sign her manifesto today and support the cause: https://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto We’ll deliver the petition at the upcoming World Health Assembly in Geneva!

Phumeza is advocating for better diagnosis & treatment for people with drug-resistant TB in every part of the world. Sign her manifesto today and support the cause: https://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto We’ll deliver the petition at the upcoming World Health Assembly in Geneva!

If you agree that current drug-resistant TB treatment is unacceptable, sign our DR-TB Manifesto petition today: https://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/! We’re calling for urgent action to improve treatments and prioritize the fight against DR-TB. We’ll deliver the petition at the upcoming World Health Assembly in Geneva!

If you agree that current drug-resistant TB treatment is unacceptable, sign our DR-TB Manifesto petition today: https://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/! We’re calling for urgent action to improve treatments and prioritize the fight against DR-TB. We’ll deliver the petition at the upcoming World Health Assembly in Geneva!

"I didn’t want to be another statistic of TB." Phumeza endured incredibly arduous treatment for her extensively drug-resistant TB. Now she is asking for better care for all TB patients. Sign the TB Manifesto:http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/Photo by Sydelle Willow Smith

"I didn’t want to be another statistic of TB." Phumeza endured incredibly arduous treatment for her extensively drug-resistant TB. Now she is asking for better care for all TB patients. Sign the TB Manifesto:http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/
Photo by Sydelle Willow Smith

With new, better drugs for his multidrug-resistant TB, Vardan is now able to be with his family instead of in and out of the hospital. “I am young. I am 60 years old. I am still useful to my community.” http://bit.ly/1if7CYg

Photo by Sven Torfinn
Swaziland is in the middle of a medical crisis. The highest HIV prevalence in the world and the emergence of drug-resistant TB threaten to have a disastrous effect on the social and economic situation there. 
Millions of people in developing countries are still waiting for the AIDS revolution. Join us for a Twitter chat on how millions of people are still waiting for the AIDS revolution: Friday, Dec. 6, 11am EST/5pm CET @MSF_SouthAfrica

Photo by Sven Torfinn

Swaziland is in the middle of a medical crisis. The highest HIV prevalence in the world and the emergence of drug-resistant TB threaten to have a disastrous effect on the social and economic situation there.

Millions of people in developing countries are still waiting for the AIDS revolution. Join us for a Twitter chat on how millions of people are still waiting for the AIDS revolution: Friday, Dec. 6, 11am EST/5pm CET @MSF_SouthAfrica

MSF is calling for better, safer treatment for drug-resistant TB - this is a major reason why. Read more: http://bit.ly/1gcE3r5

MSF is calling for better, safer treatment for drug-resistant TB - this is a major reason why. Read more: http://bit.ly/1gcE3r5

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen
More than anything, 16-yr-old Shahmosa wants to go back to school and be a “normal” girl again. But she has extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis.  http://bit.ly/1h0VGeI 

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen

More than anything, 16-yr-old Shahmosa wants to go back to school and be a “normal” girl again. But she has extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis.  http://bit.ly/1h0VGeI 

Should going deaf be the price you pay to recover from drug-resistant TB? We need better treatment now! http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/

Should going deaf be the price you pay to recover from drug-resistant TB? We need better treatment now! http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen
A year ago, 4-year-old Orion had TB meningitis and lay in a coma. “No one thought he would survive,” said MSF doctor Ionna Haziri. “But he’s getting better, a little bit every day.”http://bit.ly/HuU8t5 

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen

A year ago, 4-year-old Orion had TB meningitis and lay in a coma. “No one thought he would survive,” said MSF doctor Ionna Haziri. “But he’s getting better, a little bit every day.”http://bit.ly/HuU8t5 

How many pills does a multi-drug resistant TB patient have to swallow? We need better treatment for TB now! http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen
18-year-old Mijgona, right, is the first fully-cured multi-drug-resistant TB patient in MSF’s project in Tajikistan. “The difference couldn’t be greater,” said her mother, at left. “She was very ill, she was a different person then.” http://bit.ly/HuUAaC 

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen

18-year-old Mijgona, right, is the first fully-cured multi-drug-resistant TB patient in MSF’s project in Tajikistan. “The difference couldn’t be greater,” said her mother, at left. “She was very ill, she was a different person then.” http://bit.ly/HuUAaC 

By the end of multi-drug TB resistant treatment, you will have taken 14,600 pills and 240 injections. We need better treatment for TB now. http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/

Photo by Ron Haviv/VII Photo
The new Childhood TB Roadmap could help reverse years of neglect:http://bit.ly/1eWUFT0 

Photo by Ron Haviv/VII Photo

The new Childhood TB Roadmap could help reverse years of neglect:http://bit.ly/1eWUFT0 

Fasting in solidarity: an MSF psychologist working with child TB patients in Tajikistan describes her first Ramadan fast. Read more
Photo by Terry Porsild/MSF

Fasting in solidarity: an MSF psychologist working with child TB patients in Tajikistan describes her first Ramadan fast. Read more

Photo by Terry Porsild/MSF

Photo: Two-year-old Fadilla before and after receiving treatment for severe malnutrition and tuberculosis. 
When Fadilla’s grandmother brought her to the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in Am Timan, Chad, she wasn’t just malnourished – she was sick and in danger of dying.
At just 13 pounds, Fadilla weighed only about half of what a two-year-old child should. At the hospital, our teams diagnosed her with severe acute malnutrition and tuberculosis – two life-threatening medical conditions.
Malnutrition is a serious medical condition, and recovery only gets more difficult when illnesses like malaria or tuberculosis are also present. But with quality medical treatment, even children as sick as Fadilla can make a full recovery. It’s possible thanks to innovations like 33-cent packets of milk-based ready-to-use therapeutic food that are so simple to administer – most malnourished children can be treated by their parents or caregivers at home.
Fadilla’s tuberculosis meant she had to stay in the hospital, but after months of intensive treatment, the brightness returned to Fadilla’s eyes and she reached her target weight. “Look at Fadilla now!” her grandmother exclaimed to the hospital staff. “She is doing so much better!”
Thanks to the support of our donors, we treated 408,000 malnourished children last year. Our medical teams are able to travel to some of the most remote, dangerous, and neglected parts of the world to identify and treat children, like Fadilla, suffering from malnutrition.
There’s hope for even the most severely malnourished child. If we can reach them in time, treatments like therapeutic foods can help children who might not otherwise survive.
Donate to help Doctors Without Borders save the lives of malnourished children and bring quality medical care to people in nearly 70 countries around the world.

Photo: Two-year-old Fadilla before and after receiving treatment for severe malnutrition and tuberculosis. 

When Fadilla’s grandmother brought her to the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in Am Timan, Chad, she wasn’t just malnourished – she was sick and in danger of dying.

At just 13 pounds, Fadilla weighed only about half of what a two-year-old child should. At the hospital, our teams diagnosed her with severe acute malnutrition and tuberculosis – two life-threatening medical conditions.

Malnutrition is a serious medical condition, and recovery only gets more difficult when illnesses like malaria or tuberculosis are also present. But with quality medical treatment, even children as sick as Fadilla can make a full recovery. It’s possible thanks to innovations like 33-cent packets of milk-based ready-to-use therapeutic food that are so simple to administer – most malnourished children can be treated by their parents or caregivers at home.

Fadilla’s tuberculosis meant she had to stay in the hospital, but after months of intensive treatment, the brightness returned to Fadilla’s eyes and she reached her target weight. “Look at Fadilla now!” her grandmother exclaimed to the hospital staff. “She is doing so much better!”

Thanks to the support of our donors, we treated 408,000 malnourished children last year. Our medical teams are able to travel to some of the most remote, dangerous, and neglected parts of the world to identify and treat children, like Fadilla, suffering from malnutrition.

There’s hope for even the most severely malnourished child. If we can reach them in time, treatments like therapeutic foods can help children who might not otherwise survive.

Donate to help Doctors Without Borders save the lives of malnourished children and bring quality medical care to people in nearly 70 countries around the world.