Posts tagged tajikstan

For the first time, children in Tajikistan with multi drug-resistant tuberculosis are receiving treatment for the life threatening disease. Learn more about MSF’s Access to Essential Medicines Campaign.

For the first time, children in Tajikistan with multi drug-resistant tuberculosis are receiving treatment for the life threatening disease. Learn more about MSF’s Access to Essential Medicines Campaign.

Our psychosocial department has developed a play therapy program for the hospitalized kids. Two of our counsellors go in each weekday morning for two hours. We offer health education about TB, give them rules of behavior and cooperation, and the children can choose from different activities that stimulate development, like puzzles, Lego, drawing and coloring, and socially interactive games. What always strikes me is their eagerness to learn and the way they just soak up all the stimulation they’re being offered and even ask for more.
Terry is a psychosocial support officer working with MSF in Tajikistan. Please leave your questions and comments for Terry in the box below her blog post.

Fatal Neglect
Multidrug-Resistant TB: No Promises 

image

REGISTER NOW to join the live webcast of our conference this week on global health, neglected diseases, and R&D.

Photo: Multidrug-Resistant TB in Tajikstan 2012 © Ron Haviv/VII
Fatal NeglectMultidrug-Resistant TB: No Promises 
Patients with tuberculosis must undergo lengthy, arduous treatment regimens in the best of times. When stricken with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, or MDR-TB, however, the road back to health is even more difficult.
The most neglected are children living with MDR-TB. VII Photo’s Ron Haviv visited MSF’s pediatric MDR-TB program in Tajikistan, one of Asia’s poorest countries, where the disease is indeed spreading at an alarming rate. Through the experience of an MSF nurse trying to care for children suffering with the disease, Haviv documents this new and very dangerous medical front line.
REGISTER NOW to join the live webcast of our conference this week on global health, neglected diseases, and R&D.

Photo: Multidrug-Resistant TB in Tajikstan 2012 © Ron Haviv/VII

Fatal Neglect
Multidrug-Resistant TB: No Promises 

Patients with tuberculosis must undergo lengthy, arduous treatment regimens in the best of times. When stricken with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, or MDR-TB, however, the road back to health is even more difficult.

The most neglected are children living with MDR-TB. VII Photo’s Ron Haviv visited MSF’s pediatric MDR-TB program in Tajikistan, one of Asia’s poorest countries, where the disease is indeed spreading at an alarming rate. Through the experience of an MSF nurse trying to care for children suffering with the disease, Haviv documents this new and very dangerous medical front line.

REGISTER NOW to join the live webcast of our conference this week on global health, neglected diseases, and R&D.

Photo: Young MDR-TB patients take part in developmental activities at the pediatric hospital in Dushanbe. Tajikistan 2012 © Natasha Sergeeva/MSF
Treating “Family Tuberculosis” in Tajikstan
For the first time, children in Tajikistan with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are receiving treatment for the life-threatening disease. MSF’s new ward in Tajikstan will treat 60-100 children with TB, with special attention to family treatment.
“For MSF, a child often serves as an entry point into a family with TB,” says Zarkua. “When we identify a sick child, we can provide the family with information on how to reduce the spread of the disease, and we can trace contacts within the family to see who else might be infected.”

Photo: Young MDR-TB patients take part in developmental activities at the pediatric hospital in Dushanbe. Tajikistan 2012 © Natasha Sergeeva/MSF

Treating “Family Tuberculosis” in Tajikstan

For the first time, children in Tajikistan with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are receiving treatment for the life-threatening disease. MSF’s new ward in Tajikstan will treat 60-100 children with TB, with special attention to family treatment.

“For MSF, a child often serves as an entry point into a family with TB,” says Zarkua. “When we identify a sick child, we can provide the family with information on how to reduce the spread of the disease, and we can trace contacts within the family to see who else might be infected.”


Photo: An MSF doctor examines a young MDR-TB patient as a mental health counselor reads to him from a TB health education book. Tajikistan 2012 © Natasha Sergeeva

Tajikistan’s “Heartbreaking Mosaic of ‘Family TB’”
Voice From the Field

For the first time, children in Tajikistan with multi drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are receiving treatment for the life-threatening disease. MSF has opened a new ward in Machiton hospital, near Tajikistan’s capital of Dushanbe, where it plans to treat 60 to 100 children with TB and their family members over the next three months.

"Pediatric TB is a neglected disease, and there isn’t enough research and development, or any clear-cut advice, on how to treat it in children. Our project is significant—both for MSF and the world—because we are developing guidelines that simply didn’t exist before," says Cindy Gibb, a MSF nurse working in this new treatment program. Read more of Cindy’s experience with this ground breaking work.

Photo: An MSF doctor examines a young MDR-TB patient as a mental health counselor reads to him from a TB health education book. Tajikistan 2012 © Natasha Sergeeva

Tajikistan’s “Heartbreaking Mosaic of ‘Family TB’”
Voice From the Field

For the first time, children in Tajikistan with multi drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are receiving treatment for the life-threatening disease. MSF has opened a new ward in Machiton hospital, near Tajikistan’s capital of Dushanbe, where it plans to treat 60 to 100 children with TB and their family members over the next three months.

"Pediatric TB is a neglected disease, and there isn’t enough research and development, or any clear-cut advice, on how to treat it in children. Our project is significant—both for MSF and the world—because we are developing guidelines that simply didn’t exist before," says Cindy Gibb, a MSF nurse working in this new treatment program. Read more of Cindy’s experience with this ground breaking work.