Posts tagged support

Being able to go to the hospital at night requires a proverbial blade, its attachment and a handle. Practically speaking we need drivers, cars, petrol, guards and radio operators to make it happen. We need nurses on duty, who first discover something is wrong. We need logisticians who ensure there are generators to give light to the hospital at night. We need non-medical team members to also order key medications that I or other medics might prescribe at night. We need a coordination team in the capital to reach an agreement with the Ministry of Health that we can work here in Amtiman. And we need donors and supporters who generously give to make all of this possible.

Late at night we need a doctor. But we need a lot more too.

In her final post, Kate says a big thank you to everyone who read and commented on her blog. Please leave your questions and comments for Kate in the comments box below her blog post.

In her final post, Kate says a big thank you to everyone who read and commented on her blog. Please leave your questions and comments for Kate in the comments box below her blog post.

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MSF in 40 seconds from MSF on Vimeo.

Doctors Without Borders in 40 Seconds

This short animation introduces Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) — from it’s creation by a group of doctors and journalists in 1971 to the worldwide emergency medical aid organization that today is operating in over 60 countries.

Thank you, Tumblr fans, for your support! Your likes and reblogs help us raise awareness about crises that are often far from the the media spotlight. If you enjoy following us, spread the word and share our page with your friends!

Thanks to your generosity, we can save more lives.

With your support, our medical teams will be able to save more lives around the world. Please support Doctors Without Borders today to help us provide humanitarian medical aid to people where the need is greatest.

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Tari – a rural, little town in Papua New Guinea’s Southern Highlands has become my home for the next nine months. Here MSF runs an emergency surgical program and a Family Support Center, my work place, where survivors of domestic and sexual violence receive medical and psychological care. The level of domestic and sexual violence in PNG is epidemic. Official data is hard to obtain due to lack of research, but it is estimated that around 70% of all PNG women face physical abuse during their lives. Around half of PNG women are raped in their lifetime. The numbers are horrific, and the numerous individual fates feel overwhelming.
Meet Minja, our newest blogger, who is writing about her work on mental healthcare and psycho-social support in Papua New Guinea. Warning: Minja’s blog contains descriptions of violence you may find distressing. Please leave your comments and questions for Minja in the comments box below her blog post.
Financial Independence and AccountabilityIndependence Helps Us Go Where We’re Needed Most

Support from individuals like you is essential to our ability to operate independently, and allows Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontiéres (MSF) to respond at a moment’s notice to the most urgent emergencies, often in countries and regions that are otherwise forgotten.

MSF strives to operate efficiently and to minimize fundraising and administrative costs. Between 1995 and 2011, MSF-USA allocated more than 85 percent of its expenditures to MSF’s social mission–programs and public education activities. Maintaining this standard is a high priority for us.

Financial Independence and Accountability
Independence Helps Us Go Where We’re Needed Most

Support from individuals like you is essential to our ability to operate independently, and allows Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontiéres (MSF) to respond at a moment’s notice to the most urgent emergencies, often in countries and regions that are otherwise forgotten.

MSF strives to operate efficiently and to minimize fundraising and administrative costs. Between 1995 and 2011, MSF-USA allocated more than 85 percent of its expenditures to MSF’s social mission–programs and public education activities. Maintaining this standard is a high priority for us.

"Now There is Nothing": Testimonies from Refugees in South Sudan

Amani, who brought her daughter Harrap to the field hospital in Jamam for treatment:

“The rainy season is coming. And the place we are living, it looks like it will be in the water. We need to find another place. I know this soil, and when the rains come this will be a swamp, this will be filled with water… This is a bad place.

My daughter has diarrhea with blood. This problem has been going on for a long time now. It first started in the middle of the fighting. So now she has been ill for a long time. When the fighting started, there was no way for us to get treatment. We were just running, running, always running, until we got here. This is the first time I have been able to get some medical care for her. MSF is the first treatment we have got.”Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Robin Meldrum
A mother with her child in the Doro refugee camp in South Sudan.

"Now There is Nothing": Testimonies from Refugees in South Sudan

Amani, who brought her daughter Harrap to the field hospital in Jamam for treatment:

“The rainy season is coming. And the place we are living, it looks like it will be in the water. We need to find another place. I know this soil, and when the rains come this will be a swamp, this will be filled with water… This is a bad place.

My daughter has diarrhea with blood. This problem has been going on for a long time now. It first started in the middle of the fighting. So now she has been ill for a long time. When the fighting started, there was no way for us to get treatment. We were just running, running, always running, until we got here. This is the first time I have been able to get some medical care for her. MSF is the first treatment we have got.”

Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Robin Meldrum
A mother with her child in the Doro refugee camp in South Sudan.