Posts tagged sudan

Peter has grown up as a refugee - he first fled Sudan for Ethiopia when he was a child. Today, he lives in a refugee camp in South Sudan where he works for Doctors Without Borders as a translator. He does not believe his dreams will ever be realized, but he has hope for the next generation.

photo by Juan-Carlos Tomasi
Darfur: “Every Time You Are Able to Save a Patient it Gives You the Motivation to Save Another Life”
"We received about 34 injured people the first instance of violence, on February 8. The hospital did not have surgical supplies and the MSF medical cargo had not arrived yet. We had one emergency box for the MSF team’s personal use, just in case. We used all of the surgical supplies in that box, including material for dressings and drugs for surgeries. We also used all the drugs in the hospital. The hospital’s doctor and I performed the surgeries, we worked as a team. We also had to carry out a blood transfusion for one of the patients; we did not have a fridge, so it was done immediately. - Read more at http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/news/article.cfm?id=6813&source=ads120000R01

photo by Juan-Carlos Tomasi

Darfur: “Every Time You Are Able to Save a Patient it Gives You the Motivation to Save Another Life”

"We received about 34 injured people the first instance of violence, on February 8. The hospital did not have surgical supplies and the MSF medical cargo had not arrived yet. We had one emergency box for the MSF team’s personal use, just in case. We used all of the surgical supplies in that box, including material for dressings and drugs for surgeries. We also used all the drugs in the hospital. The hospital’s doctor and I performed the surgeries, we worked as a team. We also had to carry out a blood transfusion for one of the patients; we did not have a fridge, so it was done immediately. - Read more at http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/news/article.cfm?id=6813&source=ads120000R01

Civilians are leaving Sudan’s South Kordofan state due to a lack of food and supplies and because of the ongoing conflict. South Sudan 2013 © Yann Libessart
A Critical Situation for Sudanese Refugees in Yida
Civilians have been fleeing the conflict between Sudanese government forces and rebels from the North Sudanese People Liberation Movement (SPLM-North) in Sudan’s South Kordofan region since June 2011. The only option for many displaced people is to seek refuge in the camp of Yida, just on the other side of the border in South Sudan. As Yida’s population continues to grow, the camp’s location has become a source of complex political tensions that increasingly threaten the condition of the refugees.

Civilians are leaving Sudan’s South Kordofan state due to a lack of food and supplies and because of the ongoing conflict. South Sudan 2013 © Yann Libessart

A Critical Situation for Sudanese Refugees in Yida

Civilians have been fleeing the conflict between Sudanese government forces and rebels from the North Sudanese People Liberation Movement (SPLM-North) in Sudan’s South Kordofan region since June 2011. The only option for many displaced people is to seek refuge in the camp of Yida, just on the other side of the border in South Sudan. As Yida’s population continues to grow, the camp’s location has become a source of complex political tensions that increasingly threaten the condition of the refugees.

2am “Oncall, oncall for ICU – we have one child yes, they are convulsions…” I jolt into wakefulness and am out of my bed and running over to the hospital as fast as I can go telling the nurses to prepare IV diazepam down the radio as I go. This could be anything, but always think worst case scenario… I arrive on the ward and yes, this is actual convulsions, a four-year-old with cerebral malaria.
MSF nurse Emma writes about the of variety people she treats when on-call in South Sudan. Please leave your comments for Emma on her blog. 
Photo: Refugees displaced by violence in Darfur have settled in Tissi. Chad 2013 © MSF.
Chad: More than 10,000 Refugees Arrive in Tissi Within a Few Days
Roughly 25,000 refugees and returnees had already been living in and around five villages in southeastern Chad for nearly three months. But starting on April 4, 2013, an additional 10,000 began to arrive, having fled violent clashes in Um Dukhun, Sudan, 10 kilometers [about 6 miles] away from the border. And there’s every indication that more are on their way.
They tell similar stories, of villages attacked and set on fire by armed men on horseback, of neighbors and family members killed, of women and children abandoning all their belongings and taking flight. Fighting resumed between several Arab tribes of North and Central Darfur States a few months ago, but the situation has deteriorated dramatically in recent days.

Photo: Refugees displaced by violence in Darfur have settled in Tissi. Chad 2013 © MSF.

Chad: More than 10,000 Refugees Arrive in Tissi Within a Few Days

Roughly 25,000 refugees and returnees had already been living in and around five villages in southeastern Chad for nearly three months. But starting on April 4, 2013, an additional 10,000 began to arrive, having fled violent clashes in Um Dukhun, Sudan, 10 kilometers [about 6 miles] away from the border. And there’s every indication that more are on their way.

They tell similar stories, of villages attacked and set on fire by armed men on horseback, of neighbors and family members killed, of women and children abandoning all their belongings and taking flight. Fighting resumed between several Arab tribes of North and Central Darfur States a few months ago, but the situation has deteriorated dramatically in recent days.

Photo: Refugees displaced by fighting in North Darfur state wait for treatment. Sudan 2010 © Juan-Carlos Tomasi
Treating the Wounded After Fighting in Sudan’s North Darfur State

Photo: Refugees displaced by fighting in North Darfur state wait for treatment. Sudan 2010 © Juan-Carlos Tomasi

Treating the Wounded After Fighting in Sudan’s North Darfur State

Photo: A mother and child survey the wreckage of a market destroyed in a bombing attack in North Darfur. Sudan 2009 © Jan-Joseph Stok
Darfur: “After a Decade of Fighting There Are Still Medical Needs”
Tribal clashes over the ownership of a gold mine have already forced nearly 100,000 people from their homes in the Jebel Amir region of Sudan’s North Darfur this year. A decade has passed since the Darfur conflict began, and there are still dire medical needs in the region. Despite efforts to provide medical humanitarian aid to the people of Darfur, there is still more work to do, says Fernando Medina, our MSF head of mission in Sudan.

Photo: A mother and child survey the wreckage of a market destroyed in a bombing attack in North Darfur. Sudan 2009 © Jan-Joseph Stok

Darfur: “After a Decade of Fighting There Are Still Medical Needs”

Tribal clashes over the ownership of a gold mine have already forced nearly 100,000 people from their homes in the Jebel Amir region of Sudan’s North Darfur this year. A decade has passed since the Darfur conflict began, and there are still dire medical needs in the region. Despite efforts to provide medical humanitarian aid to the people of Darfur, there is still more work to do, says Fernando Medina, our MSF head of mission in Sudan.

Fighting Neglected Disease Sleeping Sickness in South Sudan

Sleeping sickness has been a major health problem in South Sudan for the last century. Transmitted by the tse tse fly, it can be fatal if left untreated. Over a ten-week period, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) mobile teams based in Kajo Keji traveled to remote villages where patients have little access to medical care, screening over 37,000 people for the disease and providing treatment to 

Many memories of South Sudan will remain with me forever. Sad memories of seeing first-hand the dire circumstances many people have to endure or of witnessing the death of a small child. Disturbing images like seeing a small boy play with an imitation AK47 possibly trying to mimic his father or other men. But mostly happy memories of seeing a mother’s joy when her child gets better, the appreciation of our staff for training and coaching given, the surprise on people’s faces when I talked to them in my few words of Nuer, of working together with the rest of the team and of the beautiful sunsets.
Photo: A doctor does his rounds in MSF’s Hepatitis E ward in Maban County’s Batil camp. South Sudan 2013 © Corinne Baker/MSF
MSF Responds To Hepatitis E Outbreak In South Sudan Refugee Camps
An epidemic of hepatitis E is escalating across refugee camps in South Sudan’s Maban County. To date, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has treated 3,991 patients in its health facilities in the camps and has recorded 88 deaths, including 15 pregnant women.
Hepatitis E is a virus that causes liver disease and can lead to acute liver failure and death. It is particularly dangerous for pregnant women. Like cholera, the virus spreads in environments with poor sanitation and contaminated water. There is no cure, but its symptoms are treatable.
“We have been doing everything we can to care for people with hepatitis E, but there is no treatment for the disease,” says Dr. José-Luis Dvorzak, MSF Medical Coordinator in Maban County. “We suspect this outbreak is far from over, and many more people will die.”

Photo: A doctor does his rounds in MSF’s Hepatitis E ward in Maban County’s Batil camp. South Sudan 2013 © Corinne Baker/MSF

MSF Responds To Hepatitis E Outbreak In South Sudan Refugee Camps

An epidemic of hepatitis E is escalating across refugee camps in South Sudan’s Maban County. To date, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has treated 3,991 patients in its health facilities in the camps and has recorded 88 deaths, including 15 pregnant women.

Hepatitis E is a virus that causes liver disease and can lead to acute liver failure and death. It is particularly dangerous for pregnant women. Like cholera, the virus spreads in environments with poor sanitation and contaminated water. There is no cure, but its symptoms are treatable.

“We have been doing everything we can to care for people with hepatitis E, but there is no treatment for the disease,” says Dr. José-Luis Dvorzak, MSF Medical Coordinator in Maban County. “We suspect this outbreak is far from over, and many more people will die.”

Photo: Sudanese refugees wait in line in the outpatient department at the MSF field hospital in Jamam refugee camp. South Sudan 2012 © Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
Fear and Hope in South Sudan as Refugees Start to Cross Border Again
More than 170,000 people who fled violence in Sudan are living in refugee camps in South Sudan. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been assisting the refugees since November 2011, running field hospitals and providing supplies of clean drinking water and oral rehydration fluids.
Now that the floods caused by the rainy season are subsiding refugees are starting to cross the border again. In December 2012, around 370 refugees arrived at the border village of El Fuj, traveling in two groups and arriving a few days apart. This is a small number compared to last year, when 35,000 people crossed the border in the space of just three weeks. Time will tell if the numbers will increase.
While the camps in South Sudan provide relative safety, refugees living there face dire conditions. There are still shortages of clean water—at times, 40 percent of medical consultations carried out by MSF were related to diarrhea—and there are ongoing occurrences of Hepatitis E. In Batil Camp (which hosts around 35,000 refugees), mortality rates were more than double emergency thresholds in summer 2012, and more than a quarter of the children under the age of five weremalnourished. Since September 2012, conditions have improved in many areas and mortality rates have dropped, but nutrition and food security are still serious concerns.

Photo: Sudanese refugees wait in line in the outpatient department at the MSF field hospital in Jamam refugee camp. South Sudan 2012 © Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Fear and Hope in South Sudan as Refugees Start to Cross Border Again

More than 170,000 people who fled violence in Sudan are living in refugee camps in South Sudan. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been assisting the refugees since November 2011, running field hospitals and providing supplies of clean drinking water and oral rehydration fluids.

Now that the floods caused by the rainy season are subsiding refugees are starting to cross the border again. In December 2012, around 370 refugees arrived at the border village of El Fuj, traveling in two groups and arriving a few days apart. This is a small number compared to last year, when 35,000 people crossed the border in the space of just three weeks. Time will tell if the numbers will increase.

While the camps in South Sudan provide relative safety, refugees living there face dire conditions. There are still shortages of clean water—at times, 40 percent of medical consultations carried out by MSF were related to diarrhea—and there are ongoing occurrences of Hepatitis E. In Batil Camp (which hosts around 35,000 refugees), mortality rates were more than double emergency thresholds in summer 2012, and more than a quarter of the children under the age of five weremalnourished. Since September 2012, conditions have improved in many areas and mortality rates have dropped, but nutrition and food security are still serious concerns.

A Month in Focus: December 2012

Reports on treating TB in Chechnya, fighting Yaws in Congo, working with displaced civilians in DRC and South Sudan, and battling cholera in Haiti in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

With this clinic we definitely saved lives. People were in real difficulties in the bush: not enough food, mosquitoes biting people, everyone drinking very bad water. Our clinic was not perfect, but it was better than nothing, and we saved lives.
Photo: David Bude examines a patient at the MSF clinic in Pibor. South Sudan 2012 © Robin Meldrum/MSF
Voice From the Field: A Clinic Deep in the Bush
The Clinic under the Tree
I chose a big tree, a good one with plenty of shade, and I cleared the brush underneath it. I had a plastic sheet and I gave it to my wife to make a sort of rough shelter. She cut some branches and made a frame, like a manyatta house, and we put the plastic sheeting over it. And then I made a wooden platform, like a rough bed, to keep the medicines off the ground. This was my pharmacy.
We cut some poles to make benches, so there was a waiting area for people to sit. And with poles and mud I made a sort of consultation room, so when a patient needed treatment I would see them in this “room.”
We got a message through to the MSF base team in Pibor town about where we were, and they sent some drugs by boat to the closest place a boat could get to—medicines for antenatal care, for diarrhea, for malnourished children, antibiotics, dressings, malaria drugs, even registration cards and a register for keeping proper records.
Spreading the Word
I found two of the health promoters from MSF’s Lekwongole team. They went around passing the message that if your child is sick with anything—diarrhea, eye infections, respiratory diseases, fever, or any injuries—they could come and see us.
And they came. A lot of people. Sometimes I saw 50 patients in one day. Malaria was common, and [so was] pneumonia. Children that were malnourished—we admitted 16 for malnutrition—cases of diarrhea because there was no clean water, and even a tuberculosis patient who needed a follow-up. I kept working until the supply of medicines ran out.

Photo: David Bude examines a patient at the MSF clinic in Pibor. South Sudan 2012 © Robin Meldrum/MSF

Voice From the Field: A Clinic Deep in the Bush

The Clinic under the Tree

I chose a big tree, a good one with plenty of shade, and I cleared the brush underneath it. I had a plastic sheet and I gave it to my wife to make a sort of rough shelter. She cut some branches and made a frame, like a manyatta house, and we put the plastic sheeting over it. And then I made a wooden platform, like a rough bed, to keep the medicines off the ground. This was my pharmacy.

We cut some poles to make benches, so there was a waiting area for people to sit. And with poles and mud I made a sort of consultation room, so when a patient needed treatment I would see them in this “room.”

We got a message through to the MSF base team in Pibor town about where we were, and they sent some drugs by boat to the closest place a boat could get to—medicines for antenatal care, for diarrhea, for malnourished children, antibiotics, dressings, malaria drugs, even registration cards and a register for keeping proper records.

Spreading the Word

I found two of the health promoters from MSF’s Lekwongole team. They went around passing the message that if your child is sick with anything—diarrhea, eye infections, respiratory diseases, fever, or any injuries—they could come and see us.

And they came. A lot of people. Sometimes I saw 50 patients in one day. Malaria was common, and [so was] pneumonia. Children that were malnourished—we admitted 16 for malnutrition—cases of diarrhea because there was no clean water, and even a tuberculosis patient who needed a follow-up. I kept working until the supply of medicines ran out.

Kaderia* doesn’t know how old she is. As she tells me her story I try to guess her age, she looks about fifty but perhaps her difficult life has made her age quicker. As she talks her face betrays a life of difficulty and anguish but also a look of pride and defiance.

‘My village was a very good place, except this war when people came and destroyed everything and chased the old people until we eventually escaped and came to a safe place. The whole village was burned down.’ She says a lot of people in the village died in the attack.

Kaderia explains that nothing like this had happened in their village before this year. ‘I don’t know why these people did this, maybe they wanted to take the land from us’ she explains.

Cormac blogs about meeting Kaderia, a woman still coming to terms with the violence that uprooted her from her home in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains several months ago. Please leave your questions and comments for Cormac in the comments box below his post.