Posts tagged south sudan

Photo by Michael Goldfarb/MSF
A stretcher looted from the  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in Leer, South Sudan, lies on the edge of the town’s former airstrip, marked by fresh tank tracks. ”The conflict has at times seen horrific levels of violence, including against healthcare facilities,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF head of mission. “Patients have been shot in their beds and lifesaving medical facilities have been burned and effectively destroyed. These attacks have far-reaching consequences for hundreds of thousands of people who are cut off from medical services.” MSF’s hospital in Leer was destroyed along with most of the town in late January and early February. In May, MSF resumed some activities as people started to return to Leer. Staff members treated more than 1,600 children for malnutrition in the first three weeks alone. However, MSF is unable to provide anything like its previous services, including routine vaccinations and emergency surgery.

Photo by Michael Goldfarb/MSF

A stretcher looted from the  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in Leer, South Sudan, lies on the edge of the town’s former airstrip, marked by fresh tank tracks. ”The conflict has at times seen horrific levels of violence, including against healthcare facilities,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF head of mission. “Patients have been shot in their beds and lifesaving medical facilities have been burned and effectively destroyed. These attacks have far-reaching consequences for hundreds of thousands of people who are cut off from medical services.” MSF’s hospital in Leer was destroyed along with most of the town in late January and early February. In May, MSF resumed some activities as people started to return to Leer. Staff members treated more than 1,600 children for malnutrition in the first three weeks alone. However, MSF is unable to provide anything like its previous services, including routine vaccinations and emergency surgery.

Photo by Michael Goldfarb/MSF
The operating theater in  Doctors Without Borders’/Médecins Sans Frontières’ (MSF) hospital in the town of Leer in Unity State, South Sudan, was destroyed and ransacked.  Since armed conflict erupted in South Sudan in December, at least 58 people have been killed on hospital grounds, and hospitals have been ransacked or burned on at least six occasions. The hospital in Leer was the only facility providing secondary healthcare, including surgery and treatment for HIV and tuberculosis, in an area with approximately 270,000 people.

Photo by Michael Goldfarb/MSF

The operating theater in  Doctors Without Borders’/Médecins Sans Frontières’ (MSF) hospital in the town of Leer in Unity State, South Sudan, was destroyed and ransacked.  Since armed conflict erupted in South Sudan in December, at least 58 people have been killed on hospital grounds, and hospitals have been ransacked or burned on at least six occasions. The hospital in Leer was the only facility providing secondary healthcare, including surgery and treatment for HIV and tuberculosis, in an area with approximately 270,000 people.

Photo by Michael Goldfarb/MSF
This is the burned front gate of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in the town of Leer, South Sudan as of February 2014. The hospital was thoroughly looted, burned, ransacked, and effectively destroyed, along with most of Leer, sometime between the final days of January and early February 2014, leaving hundreds of thousands of people cut off from critical, lifesaving medical care. The hospital, opened by MSF 25 years ago, was the only secondary health care facility in Unity State, South Sudan. Hospitals have been ransacked in the towns of Bor, Malakal, Bentiu, Nasir and Leer, often during periods of heavy fighting. The damage goes far beyond the acts of violence themselves as vulnerable people are cut off from healthcare when they desperately need it.

Photo by Michael Goldfarb/MSF

This is the burned front gate of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in the town of Leer, South Sudan as of February 2014. The hospital was thoroughly looted, burned, ransacked, and effectively destroyed, along with most of Leer, sometime between the final days of January and early February 2014, leaving hundreds of thousands of people cut off from critical, lifesaving medical care. The hospital, opened by MSF 25 years ago, was the only secondary health care facility in Unity State, South Sudan. Hospitals have been ransacked in the towns of Bor, Malakal, Bentiu, Nasir and Leer, often during periods of heavy fighting. The damage goes far beyond the acts of violence themselves as vulnerable people are cut off from healthcare when they desperately need it.

Medical care has come under fire in South Sudan. Over 6 months, at least 58 people were killed on hospital grounds, including 25 patients and at least 2 Ministry of Health staff. Ambulances, medical equipment and hospitals were burned, looted, and destroyed. And hundreds of thousands of people have been cut off from health care. 

Medical care has come under fire in South Sudan. Over 6 months, at least 58 people were killed on hospital grounds, including 25 patients and at least 2 Ministry of Health staff. Ambulances, medical equipment and hospitals were burned, looted, and destroyed. And hundreds of thousands of people have been cut off from health care. 

Photo by Nick Owen

Kiden Margaret, 31, is the mother of two-year-old John Mukaya. John started showing signs of cholera – an upset stomach, vomiting, crying, and not wanting to eat, so she brought him to the MSF cholera treatment center in Juba, South Sudan.  “ Cholera is now increasingly affecting many people and killing children especially. Myson was very weak, now we are here and he is put on drip and given oral rehydration solutions. I hope my son will get better. It is the first time my child is being affected and treated for cholera. My other three children are all fine. At home we eat normal food and drink usual water; I do not understand how my child got the cholera’’
Photo by Nick Owen
Kiden Margaret, 31, is the mother of two-year-old John Mukaya. John started showing signs of cholera – an upset stomach, vomiting, crying, and not wanting to eat, so she brought him to the MSF cholera treatment center in Juba, South Sudan.   Cholera is now increasingly affecting many people and killing children especially. Myson was very weak, now we are here and he is put on drip and given oral rehydration solutions. I hope my son will get better. It is the first time my child is being affected and treated for cholera. My other three children are all fine. At home we eat normal food and drink usual water; I do not understand how my child got the cholera’’
Photo by Wairimu Gitau/MSF
A mother and her four children walked hundreds of miles from Juba, South Sudan, to the Nadapal border with Kenya where they became refugees from the fighting in their home country. In Nadapal, an MSF emergency team referred them to a hospital where they were tested for measles. Read more about the conflict in South Sudan: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Wairimu Gitau/MSF

A mother and her four children walked hundreds of miles from Juba, South Sudan, to the Nadapal border with Kenya where they became refugees from the fighting in their home country. In Nadapal, an MSF emergency team referred them to a hospital where they were tested for measles. Read more about the conflict in South Sudan: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Phil Moore
A girl recovers in an MSF clinic after suffering an electric shock from an exposed wire in a refugee camp in Juba, South Sudan. Roughly 300 miles north of Juba, in Malakal, MSF was forced to suspend its medical activities last week after the MSF compound was looted. Thousands of people were left without medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Phil Moore

A girl recovers in an MSF clinic after suffering an electric shock from an exposed wire in a refugee camp in Juba, South Sudan. Roughly 300 miles north of Juba, in Malakal, MSF was forced to suspend its medical activities last week after the MSF compound was looted. Thousands of people were left without medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Jake Simkin
An MSF medical worker in Juba, South Sudan, treats an injured woman, one of the 40,000 people taking refuge from fighting in that area. Overall, MSF emergency teams are working in Juba, Awerial, and Malakal, providing medical care to more than 110,000 displaced people. Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin

An MSF medical worker in Juba, South Sudan, treats an injured woman, one of the 40,000 people taking refuge from fighting in that area. Overall, MSF emergency teams are working in Juba, Awerial, and Malakal, providing medical care to more than 110,000 displaced people. Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Phil Moore
An injured child receives medical care from MSF in Juba, South Sudan. Fighting throughout the country over the past three weeks has driven people from their homes and many are now sheltering in overcrowded camps with limited assistance. In Juba, MSF teams are seeing hundreds of people per day with diarrhea, malaria, and respiratory infections. “Highly vulnerable people have just become even more vulnerable,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF’s head of mission in South Sudan. “We don’t know what will happen to the thousands of displaced and wounded people across the country.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Phil Moore

An injured child receives medical care from MSF in Juba, South Sudan. Fighting throughout the country over the past three weeks has driven people from their homes and many are now sheltering in overcrowded camps with limited assistance. In Juba, MSF teams are seeing hundreds of people per day with diarrhea, malaria, and respiratory infections. “Highly vulnerable people have just become even more vulnerable,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF’s head of mission in South Sudan. “We don’t know what will happen to the thousands of displaced and wounded people across the country.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin
A child receives treatment from an MSF doctor in Juba, South Sudan, where tens of thousands of people have taken refuge from fighting in the area. Even before the recent fighting broke out, 80% of all health care and basic services in South Sudan was provided by NGOs and many people had limited access to care. Now, due to the dangerous security conditions for residents and aid groups alike, access to care is even more limited, with potentially grave consequences. Read more:http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin

A child receives treatment from an MSF doctor in Juba, South Sudan, where tens of thousands of people have taken refuge from fighting in the area. Even before the recent fighting broke out, 80% of all health care and basic services in South Sudan was provided by NGOs and many people had limited access to care. Now, due to the dangerous security conditions for residents and aid groups alike, access to care is even more limited, with potentially grave consequences. Read more:http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jacob Simkin/MSF
South Sudan: Since fighting erupted in Bor, Jonglei State, people have been fleeing to the town of Awerial, in neighboring Lakes State, seeking safety. The area does not have the capacity to absorb all of the new arrivals, and living conditions are near catastrophic. More medical and humanitarian assistance is urgently needed. See a slideshow: http://bit.ly/1bWgOuq

Photo by Jacob Simkin/MSF

South Sudan: Since fighting erupted in Bor, Jonglei State, people have been fleeing to the town of Awerial, in neighboring Lakes State, seeking safety. The area does not have the capacity to absorb all of the new arrivals, and living conditions are near catastrophic. More medical and humanitarian assistance is urgently needed. See a slideshow: http://bit.ly/1bWgOuq

Thank you for support in 2013. Our medical teams were challenged by crises all over the world last year. Watch this short video to see what your support allowed us to do.

From the series MSF in 2013:
“We land in the bush with boxes of medicines, plastic sheeting and two stakes to provide a little shade and we go about our work with just the basics … [treating] people with serious infections, malnourished children, pregnant women with infections, and the list goes on.”—Caroline Scholtes, Doctors Without Borders nurse in South Sudan
MSF nurse Caroline Scholtes examines a baby during an MSF mobile clinic in Dorain, Jonglei State, South Sudan. Photo © Caroline Scholtes/MSF

From the series MSF in 2013:

“We land in the bush with boxes of medicines, plastic sheeting and two stakes to provide a little shade and we go about our work with just the basics … [treating] people with serious infections, malnourished children, pregnant women with infections, and the list goes on.”
—Caroline Scholtes, Doctors Without Borders nurse in South Sudan

MSF nurse Caroline Scholtes examines a baby during an MSF mobile clinic in Dorain, Jonglei State, South Sudan. Photo © Caroline Scholtes/MSF

Photo by Anna Surinyach
An MSF midwife examines a patient. Most maternal deaths in South Sudan’s Western Equatoria State are due to postpartum hemorrhages; women living in isolated rural communities are often unable to reach a health center when complications arise.  Read more

Photo by Anna Surinyach

An MSF midwife examines a patient. Most maternal deaths in South Sudan’s Western Equatoria State are due to postpartum hemorrhages; women living in isolated rural communities are often unable to reach a health center when complications arise.  Read more

"Today we’re on the verge of starting a vaccination campaign against pneumococcal disease in Yida refugee camp (in South Sudan). What we would like to do is actually vaccinate all the children under five against pneumococcal disease but we simply can’t afford to do that at the prices we’re being made to pay for the pneumococcal vaccine.” -Dr. Greg Elder, Deputy Director of MSF Operations

"Today we’re on the verge of starting a vaccination campaign against pneumococcal disease in Yida refugee camp (in South Sudan). What we would like to do is actually vaccinate all the children under five against pneumococcal disease but we simply can’t afford to do that at the prices we’re being made to pay for the pneumococcal vaccine.” -Dr. Greg Elder, Deputy Director of MSF Operations