Posts tagged safety

Photo: MSF doctor Thomas Mollet and MSF nurse Daddy Eale Lomyaka in Katanga. DRC 2013 © MSF
DRC: Lives at Risk as Fighting Continues in Katanga Province
Fighting in Katanga province of the Democratic Republic of Congo has forced thousands of people to flee their homes and perilously reduced access to lifesaving medical services.
Amid fighting between government forces and Mai-Mai militias over recent weeks, about 500 displaced people sought refuge on the grounds of the MSF hospital in the town of Shamwana. Many others who fled farther away are cut off from essential health care due to fear of moving from the bush.
“People living here are terrified,” said Thomas Mollet, an MSF doctor in Shamwana. “We’re surrounded by empty villages and have seen a drop in patient numbers at the hospital. People have fled and don’t dare to seek medical treatment. They’re too scared.”
The fighting has also curtailed MSF outreach activities, and some Congolese nurses employed by MSF were forced to flee with the population into the bush. The MSF health centers in Monga and Kishale were looted, and solar panels were stripped from the roof. Attempts are being made to deliver medicines to remaining health posts in the area.
The people who sheltered at the MSF hospital have since moved a short distance away because of challenges maintaining hygiene within the hospital compound.

Photo: MSF doctor Thomas Mollet and MSF nurse Daddy Eale Lomyaka in Katanga. DRC 2013 © MSF

DRC: Lives at Risk as Fighting Continues in Katanga Province

Fighting in Katanga province of the Democratic Republic of Congo has forced thousands of people to flee their homes and perilously reduced access to lifesaving medical services.

Amid fighting between government forces and Mai-Mai militias over recent weeks, about 500 displaced people sought refuge on the grounds of the MSF hospital in the town of Shamwana. Many others who fled farther away are cut off from essential health care due to fear of moving from the bush.

“People living here are terrified,” said Thomas Mollet, an MSF doctor in Shamwana. “We’re surrounded by empty villages and have seen a drop in patient numbers at the hospital. People have fled and don’t dare to seek medical treatment. They’re too scared.”

The fighting has also curtailed MSF outreach activities, and some Congolese nurses employed by MSF were forced to flee with the population into the bush. The MSF health centers in Monga and Kishale were looted, and solar panels were stripped from the roof. Attempts are being made to deliver medicines to remaining health posts in the area.

The people who sheltered at the MSF hospital have since moved a short distance away because of challenges maintaining hygiene within the hospital compound.

Photo: An MSF vehicle enters the front gate of the MSF trauma hospital in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, November 29, 2011. Afghanistan 2011 © Michael Goldfarb
MSF Treats Victims of Kunduz Bomb Blast
Five people were dead on arrival and two others died during surgery. Of the 17 people treated by MSF, 11 suffered life-threatening injuries and were in critical condition. Almost all of the patients sustained blast-related injuries including fractures, head trauma, and abdominal and chest injuries requiring specialized trauma surgery.
“People rushed to the hospital after the explosion, seeking information and inquiring about their families and relatives, which is understandable,” said Aurelien Marechal, MSF Field Coordinator in Kunduz. “However, the hospital grounds were crowded, so we had to temporarily close the entrance in order to give space to the medical staff to provide urgent treatment.”
By launching a “multiple casualty plan,” which classifies patients according to the severity of their injuries, the medical team was able to identify and respond to the patients requiring immediate attention.
MSF has been running the surgical hospital in Kunduz since August 2011, providing emergency surgery and follow-up treatment for people wounded in conflict and for those suffering from other life-threatening injuries. A total of 10,000 people were treated in 2012.
In all locations where MSF works in Afghanistan, a strict no-weapons policy is implemented to ensure the safety and security of patients.
“No matter what is going on outside its gates, the hospital needs to remain a safe place for doctors to work and patients to receive lifesaving treatment,” said Marechal.

Photo: An MSF vehicle enters the front gate of the MSF trauma hospital in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, November 29, 2011. Afghanistan 2011 © Michael Goldfarb

MSF Treats Victims of Kunduz Bomb Blast

Five people were dead on arrival and two others died during surgery. Of the 17 people treated by MSF, 11 suffered life-threatening injuries and were in critical condition. Almost all of the patients sustained blast-related injuries including fractures, head trauma, and abdominal and chest injuries requiring specialized trauma surgery.

“People rushed to the hospital after the explosion, seeking information and inquiring about their families and relatives, which is understandable,” said Aurelien Marechal, MSF Field Coordinator in Kunduz. “However, the hospital grounds were crowded, so we had to temporarily close the entrance in order to give space to the medical staff to provide urgent treatment.”

By launching a “multiple casualty plan,” which classifies patients according to the severity of their injuries, the medical team was able to identify and respond to the patients requiring immediate attention.

MSF has been running the surgical hospital in Kunduz since August 2011, providing emergency surgery and follow-up treatment for people wounded in conflict and for those suffering from other life-threatening injuries. A total of 10,000 people were treated in 2012.

In all locations where MSF works in Afghanistan, a strict no-weapons policy is implemented to ensure the safety and security of patients.

“No matter what is going on outside its gates, the hospital needs to remain a safe place for doctors to work and patients to receive lifesaving treatment,” said Marechal.

Somalia: MSF Hospital Caught in Center of Fighting in Mogadishu


The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders condemns today’s shelling of Daynile Hospital in Somalia’s capital, Mogadishu.

Fighting began in the morning in Daynile, a neighborhood located in an outlying area of Mogadishu. The shelling struck the hospital’s emergency room and a portion of the surgical ward, causing significant damage. MSF has worked in the hospital since 2006.There were no casualties among the hospital’s 19 patients or staff, comprising 36 medical personnel and 12 guards. All patients and staff sought shelter from the shelling in the internal medicine department.

MSF calls on parties to the conflict in Somalia to respect the neutrality of Daynile Hospital, along with that of all medical facilities in the country, and to respect the safety of patients and hospital staff.Photo: Somalia 2011 © MSF
A building in a refugee camp in downtown Mogadishu, not far from the MSF hospital at Daynile, bears the scars of the conflict.

Somalia: MSF Hospital Caught in Center of Fighting in Mogadishu

The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders condemns today’s shelling of Daynile Hospital in Somalia’s capital, Mogadishu.

Fighting began in the morning in Daynile, a neighborhood located in an outlying area of Mogadishu. The shelling struck the hospital’s emergency room and a portion of the surgical ward, causing significant damage. MSF has worked in the hospital since 2006.

There were no casualties among the hospital’s 19 patients or staff, comprising 36 medical personnel and 12 guards. All patients and staff sought shelter from the shelling in the internal medicine department.

MSF calls on parties to the conflict in Somalia to respect the neutrality of Daynile Hospital, along with that of all medical facilities in the country, and to respect the safety of patients and hospital staff.

Photo: Somalia 2011 © MSF A building in a refugee camp in downtown Mogadishu, not far from the MSF hospital at Daynile, bears the scars of the conflict.