Posts tagged refugees

Photo by Samantha Maurin/MSF
Refugees pose for a photo in the Clément center in N’Djamena, the capital of Chad. Six hundred Central African refugees are living in this transit center constructed by the government of Chad in order to accommodate the 15,000 people who were evacuated from Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR), by air. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) conducts medical consultations in each of the eight sites hosting the CAR refugees in N’Djamena. MSF’s mobile teams found many patients in need of basic health care, as well as several serious post-op cases that required follow-up. There is an increasing need of water and sanitation provision, which MSF teams are supporting. MSF has also set up operations in the south of Chad, in Bitoye and Sido, where an additional 25,000 refugees have arrived from CAR.

Photo by Samantha Maurin/MSF

Refugees pose for a photo in the Clément center in N’Djamena, the capital of Chad. Six hundred Central African refugees are living in this transit center constructed by the government of Chad in order to accommodate the 15,000 people who were evacuated from Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR), by air. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) conducts medical consultations in each of the eight sites hosting the CAR refugees in N’Djamena. MSF’s mobile teams found many patients in need of basic health care, as well as several serious post-op cases that required follow-up. There is an increasing need of water and sanitation provision, which MSF teams are supporting. MSF has also set up operations in the south of Chad, in Bitoye and Sido, where an additional 25,000 refugees have arrived from CAR.

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF
Anyone who hides Muslims from the anti-balaka militia is at risk in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). On February 7, an anti-Balaka group entered a house where 86 displaced Muslim men, women, and children were being hidden. Seven men were executed and three people were struck with a machete, including a 12-year-old child. After nearly two hours of very tense negotiations, MSF was able to gather the wounded and those requiring immediate medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF

Anyone who hides Muslims from the anti-balaka militia is at risk in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). On February 7, an anti-Balaka group entered a house where 86 displaced Muslim men, women, and children were being hidden. Seven men were executed and three people were struck with a machete, including a 12-year-old child. After nearly two hours of very tense negotiations, MSF was able to gather the wounded and those requiring immediate medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

“Refugee children are incredibly vulnerable to developing vaccine-preventable diseases, so why do we keep hearing the players in the global vaccination community tell us these kids aren’t their problem?” asked Kate Elder, vaccines policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. Read more

“Refugee children are incredibly vulnerable to developing vaccine-preventable diseases, so why do we keep hearing the players in the global vaccination community tell us these kids aren’t their problem?” asked Kate Elder, vaccines policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. Read more

Ask MSF’s International President, Dr. Unni Karunakara, anything on @Reddit on Monday at 9am EDT @Reddit_AMA

Ask MSF’s International President, Dr. Unni Karunakara, anything on @Reddit on Monday at 9am EDT @Reddit_AMA

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi
In a country where people are already struggling, refugees and migrants have become “invisible” to much of Greek society. Thousands have been arrested and imprisoned in detention centers where they live in appalling conditions with little or no access to medical care. Most of the migrants who come through northern Greece’s Evros region are from Afghanistan, like these children, while others come from Pakistan, Syria, Bangladesh and Somalia. A Doctors Without Borders emergency team has been working at three border police stations where migrants are received and at the Filakio detention center, where many are detained. Read more: http://bit.ly/19InPQT

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi

In a country where people are already struggling, refugees and migrants have become “invisible” to much of Greek society. Thousands have been arrested and imprisoned in detention centers where they live in appalling conditions with little or no access to medical care. Most of the migrants who come through northern Greece’s Evros region are from Afghanistan, like these children, while others come from Pakistan, Syria, Bangladesh and Somalia. A Doctors Without Borders emergency team has been working at three border police stations where migrants are received and at the Filakio detention center, where many are detained. Read more: http://bit.ly/19InPQT

"Our patients are an eclectic profile. Some are traditionally dressed and come from rural parts of Syria. These include the Bedouin people, who often have facial tattooing and traditional dress. Many women wear the burka. Some people are clothed in typical modern-day European/American attire of jeans and t-shirt. These people are generally from the cities such as Homs, Damascus and Aleppo. Despite their aesthetic differences, they have something in common. They have all lost everything they owned. They have all witnessed horrendous tragedy and acts of violence. They are all mourning the deaths of loved ones. And what is worse, they are living in fear about the fate of loved ones who are unaccounted for, left behind in Syria." - MSF doctor Aoife Doran in Tripoli.
Read more: http://blogs.msf.org/aoifed/2013/05/swing-of-things/
Photo © Aurelie Lachant/MSF

"Our patients are an eclectic profile. Some are traditionally dressed and come from rural parts of Syria. These include the Bedouin people, who often have facial tattooing and traditional dress. Many women wear the burka. Some people are clothed in typical modern-day European/American attire of jeans and t-shirt. These people are generally from the cities such as Homs, Damascus and Aleppo. Despite their aesthetic differences, they have something in common. They have all lost everything they owned. They have all witnessed horrendous tragedy and acts of violence. They are all mourning the deaths of loved ones. And what is worse, they are living in fear about the fate of loved ones who are unaccounted for, left behind in Syria." - MSF doctor Aoife Doran in Tripoli.

Read more: http://blogs.msf.org/aoifed/2013/05/swing-of-things/

Photo © Aurelie Lachant/MSF

Malian Refugees Find Safety, Health Risks in Mauritania Camp

Malian refugees began arriving in Mauritania in February 2012; today, almost 70,000 people are living in Mbera camp alone. There, they are far from the conflict, but living conditions are difficult and many children are becoming malnourished.

Though the camp is far from the conflict, living conditions here are precarious. Since the start of the year, the number of malnourished children has more than doubled.

Close to 170,000 refugees now live in the countries bordering Mali. They hear the stories of the continuing violence back in Mali. They will not return home any time soon.

Photo: A herd of goats being driven out into the savannah to graze on the edge of the Mbera camp for Malian refugees in Mauritania. Mauritania 2013 © Nyani Quarmyne
Stranded in the Desert
The majority of the refugees in Mbera camp are pastoralists who lived nomadic or semi-nomadic lifestyles in Mali. Dependent on their livestock for a living, many of them fled with their cattles. However, 55% of the refugees interviewed left family members at home to tend to the livestock.

Photo: A herd of goats being driven out into the savannah to graze on the edge of the Mbera camp for Malian refugees in Mauritania. Mauritania 2013 © Nyani Quarmyne

Stranded in the Desert

The majority of the refugees in Mbera camp are pastoralists who lived nomadic or semi-nomadic lifestyles in Mali. Dependent on their livestock for a living, many of them fled with their cattles. However, 55% of the refugees interviewed left family members at home to tend to the livestock.

Stranded in the DesertRead this full report on the living conditions of refugees.
Since the start of the conflict in Mali in January 2012, hundreds of thousands of people have fled to other locations inside the country or to neighboring countries. More than 270,000 people have been displaced within Mali, according to the United Nations, while more than 170,000 refugees have fled to neighboringBurkina Faso, Mauritania, and Niger. Mauritania hosts the highest number of refugees, with some 68,000 people registered by the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in camps in Mauritania.
Due to the ethnic and political background of this refugee crisis, there is little prospect of the refugees returning to Mali in the near future. The challenge for aid agencies will be to put in place long-term plans that will bring living conditions in the camps up to acceptable humanitarian standards.

Stranded in the Desert
Read this full report on the living conditions of refugees.


Since the start of the conflict in Mali in January 2012, hundreds of thousands of people have fled to other locations inside the country or to neighboring countries. More than 270,000 people have been displaced within Mali, according to the United Nations, while more than 170,000 refugees have fled to neighboringBurkina FasoMauritania, and Niger. Mauritania hosts the highest number of refugees, with some 68,000 people registered by the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in camps in Mauritania.

Due to the ethnic and political background of this refugee crisis, there is little prospect of the refugees returning to Mali in the near future. The challenge for aid agencies will be to put in place long-term plans that will bring living conditions in the camps up to acceptable humanitarian standards.

Photo: An elderly Syrian refugee suffering from Parkinson’s disease sleeps in a room in a ramshackle home on a cattle ground in Tripoli, Lebanon, surrounded by his daughter-in-law and granddaughter. Lebanon 2013 © Michael Goldfarb
Lebanon: Aid Lags Far Behind as Syrian Refugees Increase
Syrians who have fled violent conflict at home to seek safety in Lebanon do not receive anywhere near adequate levels of humanitarian assistance and are living in extremely precarious conditions, a detailed survey released today by MSF.
The MSF report, “Misery Beyond the War Zone,” shows that of the 220,000Syrians who have sought refuge so far in Lebanon, many cannot obtain necessary health care, among other worrying findings. The survey, which follows a similarstudy carried out by MSF six months ago, reveals a marked deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Lebanon, in large part due to extremely lengthy registration delays. Refugees in Lebanon are not entitled to formal assistance if they are not registered. Lebanon is home to the largest number of Syrian refugees.

Photo: An elderly Syrian refugee suffering from Parkinson’s disease sleeps in a room in a ramshackle home on a cattle ground in Tripoli, Lebanon, surrounded by his daughter-in-law and granddaughter. Lebanon 2013 © Michael Goldfarb

Lebanon: Aid Lags Far Behind as Syrian Refugees Increase

Syrians who have fled violent conflict at home to seek safety in Lebanon do not receive anywhere near adequate levels of humanitarian assistance and are living in extremely precarious conditions, a detailed survey released today by MSF.

The MSF report, “Misery Beyond the War Zone,” shows that of the 220,000Syrians who have sought refuge so far in Lebanon, many cannot obtain necessary health care, among other worrying findings. The survey, which follows a similarstudy carried out by MSF six months ago, reveals a marked deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Lebanon, in large part due to extremely lengthy registration delays. Refugees in Lebanon are not entitled to formal assistance if they are not registered. Lebanon is home to the largest number of Syrian refugees.

Photo:Malian refugees wait in Fassala to be registered by Mauritanian officials and a local NGO after fleeing Mali for the border. Mauritania 2012 © Lynsey Addario/VII
Alarming Malnutrition and Mortality Among Malian Refugees in Mauritania
One year after the start of the political crisis in Mali, insecurity resulting from the military coup, the Tuareg rebellion, and the presence of armed Islamist groups in the north has displaced hundreds of thousands of people. Some 55,000 refugees are still living in difficult conditions in the Mbera camp in Mauritania. A nutrition and retrospective mortality survey by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontères (MSF) has revealed critical mortality and malnutrition rates. In this interview, Karl Nawezi, head of MSF’s activities in Mauritania, explains why the situation in the camp—which is located in the middle of the desert a few kilometres from the Malian border—has reached such an alarming point.

Photo:Malian refugees wait in Fassala to be registered by Mauritanian officials and a local NGO after fleeing Mali for the border. Mauritania 2012 © Lynsey Addario/VII

Alarming Malnutrition and Mortality Among Malian Refugees in Mauritania


One year after the start of the political crisis in Mali, insecurity resulting from the military coup, the Tuareg rebellion, and the presence of armed Islamist groups in the north has displaced hundreds of thousands of people. Some 55,000 refugees are still living in difficult conditions in the Mbera camp in Mauritania. A nutrition and retrospective mortality survey by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontères (MSF) has revealed critical mortality and malnutrition rates. In this interview, Karl Nawezi, head of MSF’s activities in Mauritania, explains why the situation in the camp—which is located in the middle of the desert a few kilometres from the Malian border—has reached such an alarming point.

MSF Field Report: Decreasing Child Mortality in South Sudan“How Did You Know We Were Here?”
The refugees wanted to know Dr. Jacoby’s story. They wanted to know where she was from, why MSF had come, and how did MSF even know they were there? Dr. Jacoby showed them the video that convinced her to go to Batil. It mad a major impact on them to realize that we were documenting their situation, and sharing it—“and that this information was enough to get people like me to come to Batil,” says Dr. Jacoby.
“I think that is really powerful. I think that knowing someone on the other side of the world saw what they’re up against, and cares enough to come, really helps people.”

MSF Field Report: Decreasing Child Mortality in South Sudan
“How Did You Know We Were Here?”


The refugees wanted to know Dr. Jacoby’s story. They wanted to know where she was from, why MSF had come, and how did MSF even know they were there? 

Dr. Jacoby showed them the video that convinced her to go to Batil. It mad a major impact on them to realize that we were documenting their situation, and sharing it—“and that this information was enough to get people like me to come to Batil,” says Dr. Jacoby.

“I think that is really powerful. I think that knowing someone on the other side of the world saw what they’re up against, and cares enough to come, really helps people.”

MSF Field Report: Decreasing Child Mortality in South Sudan 
A Crazy First Day


On Dr. Jacoby’s first day in Batil refugee camp, she didn’t even make it into the section of the clinic that constituted the therapeutic feeding center. There were so many people in need of immediate care, so she immediately began to help out the nurse that ran the outpatient department.

"There were far more sick people in Batil than you ever expect to see in one place. They were incredibly fragile, and throughout the camp there was just a massive amount of medical needs— respiratory infections, diarrhea, severe dehydration, malnutrition, and malari," recounts Dr. Jacoby on her ‘crazy first day.’

Photo: A patient tells his story during a mental health consultation in Dagahaley camp. Kenya 2012 © Robin Hammond
Psychologists Sans Frontières: Bringing Mental Health Care to People Who Need It
During wars or following natural disasters, the proportion of people suffering from depression or anxiety—both normal reactions to traumatic events—often doubles or triples. In extreme situations, the whole population experiences increased anxiety or sadness. Most people get through it alone or with the help of friends and family. But for others, psychological or psychiatric care is necessary. 
Psychologists are an integral part of our teams, and play a vital role in patient recovery. In 2011, MSF psychologists carried out almost 17,000 individual mental health consultations and 19,2000 group counseling sessions. Learn more about how and why we’re providing mental health care in projects around the world. 

Photo: A patient tells his story during a mental health consultation in Dagahaley camp. Kenya 2012 © Robin Hammond

Psychologists Sans Frontières: Bringing Mental Health Care to People Who Need It

During wars or following natural disasters, the proportion of people suffering from depression or anxiety—both normal reactions to traumatic events—often doubles or triples. In extreme situations, the whole population experiences increased anxiety or sadness. Most people get through it alone or with the help of friends and family. But for others, psychological or psychiatric care is necessary. 

Psychologists are an integral part of our teams, and play a vital role in patient recovery. In 2011, MSF psychologists carried out almost 17,000 individual mental health consultations and 19,2000 group counseling sessions. Learn more about how and why we’re providing mental health care in projects around the world.