Posts tagged rainy season

MSF in Mali: “We Will Not Abandon Our Patients Now”
In the town of Gao, in conflict-riven northern Mali, an average of 120 patients make their way to the MSF Wabaria and Sossokoira health centers each day. Even though the rainy season is over, 70 percent come with malaria, a potentially fatal parasitic disease that leaves sufferers exhausted from high fevers and uncontrollable shivers. Despite the war, it is malaria that the MSF medical teams in the region are battling most fiercely. It remains the leading cause of death in the country, and it is particularly dangerous for children under the age of five.
“Although there is a hospital and 10 health centers in and around Gao town, this is for a population of 400,000, and we realized that some people still had no access to medical care. Our patients tell us that all they hope for is peace. And we are with them; we stayed here throughout the air strikes, we will not abandon our patients now. We hope that the health system will develop and eventually replace us. But until then, we will stay and ensure that the people of Gao and Ansongo continue to have access to quality and free health care,” says Dr. Jose Bafoa, MSF’s medical team leader in Gao. 

MSF in Mali: “We Will Not Abandon Our Patients Now”

In the town of Gao, in conflict-riven northern Mali, an average of 120 patients make their way to the MSF Wabaria and Sossokoira health centers each day. Even though the rainy season is over, 70 percent come with malaria, a potentially fatal parasitic disease that leaves sufferers exhausted from high fevers and uncontrollable shivers. Despite the war, it is malaria that the MSF medical teams in the region are battling most fiercely. It remains the leading cause of death in the country, and it is particularly dangerous for children under the age of five.

“Although there is a hospital and 10 health centers in and around Gao town, this is for a population of 400,000, and we realized that some people still had no access to medical care. Our patients tell us that all they hope for is peace. And we are with them; we stayed here throughout the air strikes, we will not abandon our patients now. We hope that the health system will develop and eventually replace us. But until then, we will stay and ensure that the people of Gao and Ansongo continue to have access to quality and free health care,” says Dr. Jose Bafoa, MSF’s medical team leader in Gao. 

This whole region is a vast wetland of the Nile – beautiful in a way, but a terrible place for a refugee camp.
Water and sanitation specialist Imran writes his first blog from Jamam, a waterlogged refugee camp in South Sudan. Please leave your questions and comments for Imran in the comments box below his blog post.
Photo: Sudanese refugees in Yida Camp. South Sudan 2012 © V. Wartner/20 MINUTES

"We’ve Brought the Mortality Down in Yida"Interview with André Heller, MSF Head of Mission in South Sudan

Following up on yesterday’s “Africa Today” interview with Kasia Queen, André Heller Pérache, MSF head of mission in South Sudan, explains MSF’s contribution to reducing mortality rates at Yida. Though we’ve made significant progress, the conditions are still not completely under control, and efforts must continue. 

With the rainy season, efforts of bringing in supplies have been challenged. “Now we have to maintain the momentum over the next few months, because the refugees’ situation in Yida is still precarious,” says Pérache. Read more of the interview here and follow MSF’s work in South Sudan.

Photo: Sudanese refugees in Yida Camp. South Sudan 2012 © V. Wartner/20 MINUTES

"We’ve Brought the Mortality Down in Yida"
Interview with André Heller, MSF Head of Mission in South Sudan

Following up on yesterday’s “Africa Today” interview with Kasia Queen, André Heller Pérache, MSF head of mission in South Sudan, explains MSF’s contribution to reducing mortality rates at Yida. Though we’ve made significant progress, the conditions are still not completely under control, and efforts must continue.

With the rainy season, efforts of bringing in supplies have been challenged. “Now we have to maintain the momentum over the next few months, because the refugees’ situation in Yida is still precarious,” says Pérache. Read more of the interview here and follow MSF’s work in South Sudan.

Walking For Days To Escape Violence: One Refugee’s Crossing Into South Sudan

Amal is 28 years old and a mother of three. She and around 35,000 other refugees escaped violence in Sudan’s Blue Nile State by crossing the border into South Sudan in May and June. On June 12, Amal was brought to a MSF mobile clinic at a refugee transit site called ‘Kilometer 18’ in Upper Nile State. She was thin, weak and coughing, and she could barely walk. Amal was immediately examined, an IV drip was inserted into her arm, and she was transferred to MSF’s hospital in the Jamam refugee camp. MSF health staff suspect that she has tuberculosis and will start her on TB treatment soon. Amal weighs just 32 kilograms, or 80 pounds, and she is too weak to speak, so her cousin Hassan told her story on her behalf.

South Sudan: Aid Needed Before the Rains Start

Ninety-thousand refugees fleeing conflict have taken refuge in the camps of Jamam and Doro. Aid is desperately needed before the rainy season complicates access to the camps.

Burkina Faso: A Constant Flow of Refugees

Approximately 56,000 Malians have taken refuge in Burkina Faso after fleeing fighting that began in Mali in mid-January. They are living in makeshift shelters in camps where the sun beats down relentlessly and where aid is severely lacking.

International Aid Remains Insufficient for 160,000 Malian Refugees

Nearly 160,000 Malians have fled their country for camps in Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Niger. While instability persists in Mali, another threat looms: the rainy season, which will further complicate the deployment of aid.