Posts tagged psychology

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF
The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF

The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

Photo by Kristine Langelund/MSF
In the Philippines: “I asked children to draw a picture of their community before and after the typhoon, and another as they would like it to be when it has been rebuilt. Then we make the paper into a boat and set it out to sail on the sea with a wish…Where I am from in Brazil, this is something that we do at this time of year, hoping that the New Year will bring good things to everyone.” -Ana Cecilia Weintraub, MSF psychologist Read more: http://bit.ly/1i4GtqB

Photo by Kristine Langelund/MSF

In the Philippines: “I asked children to draw a picture of their community before and after the typhoon, and another as they would like it to be when it has been rebuilt. Then we make the paper into a boat and set it out to sail on the sea with a wish…Where I am from in Brazil, this is something that we do at this time of year, hoping that the New Year will bring good things to everyone.” -Ana Cecilia Weintraub, MSF psychologist 
Read more: http://bit.ly/1i4GtqB

Photo by Pierre-Yves Bernard/MSF
Mental health needs among Syrian refugees are steadily increasing. In Domeez camp, Iraq, “disorders such as schizophrenia and severe depression are becoming more commonplace, and we are seeing many patients who have suicidal tendencies.” MSF psychologists and counselors have worked here along with medical staff for over a year now. Read more: http://bit.ly/1bcvJm3

Photo by Pierre-Yves Bernard/MSF

Mental health needs among Syrian refugees are steadily increasing. In Domeez camp, Iraq, “disorders such as schizophrenia and severe depression are becoming more commonplace, and we are seeing many patients who have suicidal tendencies.” MSF psychologists and counselors have worked here along with medical staff for over a year now. Read more: http://bit.ly/1bcvJm3

Photo by Philippe Schneider
A nurse uses a doll to show where a patient was injured at the 9 Mile Clinic in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Doctors Without Borders treats survivors of sexual and domestic violence and trains local staff to provide integrated care. This is a simplified treatment protocol that includes: psychological first aid; prophylaxis for HIV and medicine for other sexually transmitted infections (STIs); emergency contraception; and vaccination to prevent Hepatitis B and tetanus—all in one session. http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/news/article.cfm?id=6850&cat=field-news

Photo by Philippe Schneider

A nurse uses a doll to show where a patient was injured at the 9 Mile Clinic in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Doctors Without Borders treats survivors of sexual and domestic violence and trains local staff to provide integrated care. This is a simplified treatment protocol that includes: psychological first aid; prophylaxis for HIV and medicine for other sexually transmitted infections (STIs); emergency contraception; and vaccination to prevent Hepatitis B and tetanus—all in one session. http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/news/article.cfm?id=6850&cat=field-news

I saw people injure each other with bush knives, I saw mothers beating their children, I saw limbs being cut off, I saw extreme emotional suffering, I saw people die. But I also experienced the warmth and love that the local people generously share every day, despite all the violence, paradoxically to it.
Photo: A young refugee in Domeez camp, where more than 55,000 people have settled. Iraq 2013 © Pierre-Yves Bernard/MSF
Providing Psychological Care in Syria: “Flashbacks, Nightmares, and Baby Clothes”
People have lost their identity. Older men cannot find their place in society and in the family. They have lost their job or stopped being a fighter. Maybe they have responsibility for a family but they have had to move house several times in quick succession.
"I don’t have to find them; they come and ask for help …"
I don’t have to find them; they come and ask for help, saying things like, “I’m starting to be violent towards my wife and children. Please help me, I cannot be like that.”
Psychologist Audrey Magis recently returned home after spending two months working with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Syria, where she set up and ran a mental health program in one of MSF’s projects in the north of the country. Magis, who had previously worked for MSF in Gaza, Libya, and in a camp for Syrian refugees, explains how the war has affected people and what MSF is doing to help.

Photo: A young refugee in Domeez camp, where more than 55,000 people have settled. Iraq 2013 © Pierre-Yves Bernard/MSF

Providing Psychological Care in Syria: “Flashbacks, Nightmares, and Baby Clothes”

People have lost their identity. Older men cannot find their place in society and in the family. They have lost their job or stopped being a fighter. Maybe they have responsibility for a family but they have had to move house several times in quick succession.

"I don’t have to find them; they come and ask for help …"

I don’t have to find them; they come and ask for help, saying things like, “I’m starting to be violent towards my wife and children. Please help me, I cannot be like that.”

Psychologist Audrey Magis recently returned home after spending two months working with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Syria, where she set up and ran a mental health program in one of MSF’s projects in the north of the country. Magis, who had previously worked for MSF in Gaza, Libya, and in a camp for Syrian refugees, explains how the war has affected people and what MSF is doing to help.

Photo: Children draw as part of MSF’s mental health activities in Doro Camp. South Sudan 2012 © Christina Jo Larsen/MSF
Tending to “Invisible Wounds” Among Sudanese Refugees in South Sudan
Refugees escaping from violence are put through a tremendous amount of stress. Not only are there physical stressors to overcome, but there are mental and emotional stressors that are sometimes hidden behind a resilient spirit. This stress brings with it additional challenges for individuals and families already stretched to their limits. Among the Sudanese refugees who fled conflict and bombardments in their villages and are now seeking sanctuary inSouth Sudan, MSF teams are seeing a great deal of depression, anxiety, fear, and physical ailments with no clear origins. In Upper Nile State’s Maban County, where upwards of 100,000 refugees from Sudan’s Blue Nile State are living in a network of camps, MSF therefore augments its medical activities with psychosocial care.
The stress manifests in many different ways, and part of MSF’s aim is to help people find ways to express it. One day not long ago, a girl around 14 years old wearing a threadbare nightgown sat quietly among a group of smiling and shouting children, staring down at a piece of paper. She had been asked to draw the thing that she fears most, and despite the noise around her, she was focused entirely on the exercise.
MSF psychologist Julia Stempel leaned over to see what the girl was drawing. A picture of a large airplane covered most of the paper.
“The children are asked to draw what frightens them the most, and almost everyone draws an airplane,” Stempel said. “They say it’s the airplanes that forced them to flee.”

Photo: Children draw as part of MSF’s mental health activities in Doro Camp. South Sudan 2012 © Christina Jo Larsen/MSF

Tending to “Invisible Wounds” Among Sudanese Refugees in South Sudan

Refugees escaping from violence are put through a tremendous amount of stress. Not only are there physical stressors to overcome, but there are mental and emotional stressors that are sometimes hidden behind a resilient spirit. This stress brings with it additional challenges for individuals and families already stretched to their limits. Among the Sudanese refugees who fled conflict and bombardments in their villages and are now seeking sanctuary inSouth Sudan, MSF teams are seeing a great deal of depression, anxiety, fear, and physical ailments with no clear origins. In Upper Nile State’s Maban County, where upwards of 100,000 refugees from Sudan’s Blue Nile State are living in a network of camps, MSF therefore augments its medical activities with psychosocial care.

The stress manifests in many different ways, and part of MSF’s aim is to help people find ways to express it. One day not long ago, a girl around 14 years old wearing a threadbare nightgown sat quietly among a group of smiling and shouting children, staring down at a piece of paper. She had been asked to draw the thing that she fears most, and despite the noise around her, she was focused entirely on the exercise.

MSF psychologist Julia Stempel leaned over to see what the girl was drawing. A picture of a large airplane covered most of the paper.

“The children are asked to draw what frightens them the most, and almost everyone draws an airplane,” Stempel said. “They say it’s the airplanes that forced them to flee.”

Photo: A patient tells his story during a mental health consultation in Dagahaley camp. Kenya 2012 © Robin Hammond
Psychologists Sans Frontières: Bringing Mental Health Care to People Who Need It
During wars or following natural disasters, the proportion of people suffering from depression or anxiety—both normal reactions to traumatic events—often doubles or triples. In extreme situations, the whole population experiences increased anxiety or sadness. Most people get through it alone or with the help of friends and family. But for others, psychological or psychiatric care is necessary. 
Psychologists are an integral part of our teams, and play a vital role in patient recovery. In 2011, MSF psychologists carried out almost 17,000 individual mental health consultations and 19,2000 group counseling sessions. Learn more about how and why we’re providing mental health care in projects around the world. 

Photo: A patient tells his story during a mental health consultation in Dagahaley camp. Kenya 2012 © Robin Hammond

Psychologists Sans Frontières: Bringing Mental Health Care to People Who Need It

During wars or following natural disasters, the proportion of people suffering from depression or anxiety—both normal reactions to traumatic events—often doubles or triples. In extreme situations, the whole population experiences increased anxiety or sadness. Most people get through it alone or with the help of friends and family. But for others, psychological or psychiatric care is necessary. 

Psychologists are an integral part of our teams, and play a vital role in patient recovery. In 2011, MSF psychologists carried out almost 17,000 individual mental health consultations and 19,2000 group counseling sessions. Learn more about how and why we’re providing mental health care in projects around the world.