Posts tagged photojournalist

Photo by Ton Koene
Join us Dec. 4 for “Disaster, Ignored”, a webcast on the current situation in Central African Republic (CAR). Violence in CAR has raged on over the last year, displacing some 400,000 people and further worsening their access to health care. MSF Director of Operations Marie-Noelle Rodrigue, and two US-based aid workers, nurse Michelle Mays and Dr. Yolaine Civil, will lead the discussion. Register here: http://disasterignored.eventbrite.com/

Photo by Ton Koene

Join us Dec. 4 for “Disaster, Ignored”, a webcast on the current situation in Central African Republic (CAR). Violence in CAR has raged on over the last year, displacing some 400,000 people and further worsening their access to health care. MSF Director of Operations Marie-Noelle Rodrigue, and two US-based aid workers, nurse Michelle Mays and Dr. Yolaine Civil, will lead the discussion. Register here: http://disasterignored.eventbrite.com/

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen
A year ago, 4-year-old Orion had TB meningitis and lay in a coma. “No one thought he would survive,” said MSF doctor Ionna Haziri. “But he’s getting better, a little bit every day.”http://bit.ly/HuU8t5 

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen

A year ago, 4-year-old Orion had TB meningitis and lay in a coma. “No one thought he would survive,” said MSF doctor Ionna Haziri. “But he’s getting better, a little bit every day.”http://bit.ly/HuU8t5 

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen
5-year-old Umeda is undergoing arduous treatment for drug-resistant TB in Tajikistan. She gets a gold star every day when she takes her medicine. http://bit.ly/1dq2zSb

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen

5-year-old Umeda is undergoing arduous treatment for drug-resistant TB in Tajikistan. She gets a gold star every day when she takes her medicine. http://bit.ly/1dq2zSb

Photo by Lynsey Addario/VII
A woman waits to be transported to the MSF hospital to have her second c-section in Bo, Sierra Leone.
A doctor blogs from the same hospital about a different patient: “She had delivered this baby at home over 36 hours before. The baby was doing well but she had not delivered the placenta and had started hemorrhaging. She had to walk an hour and a half to the nearest clinic to get an ambulance to take her to the hospital. When she arrived she was only semi-conscious, covered in blood, and her hemoglobin was only 3.1.” Read blog- http://msf.me/19GFsSo

Photo by Lynsey Addario/VII

A woman waits to be transported to the MSF hospital to have her second c-section in Bo, Sierra Leone.

A doctor blogs from the same hospital about a different patient: “She had delivered this baby at home over 36 hours before. The baby was doing well but she had not delivered the placenta and had started hemorrhaging. She had to walk an hour and a half to the nearest clinic to get an ambulance to take her to the hospital. When she arrived she was only semi-conscious, covered in blood, and her hemoglobin was only 3.1.” Read blog- http://msf.me/19GFsSo

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII PhotoAn MSF nurse treats a patient at MSF’s free cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince on Wednesday. The cholera outbreak that began in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake continues to devastate people’s lives. Funding for treatment of the disease has fallen sharply in the last year, leaving people without care or making them pay for it. MSF treated 23,000 people for cholera in 2012.

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII Photo
An MSF nurse treats a patient at MSF’s free cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince on Wednesday. The cholera outbreak that began in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake continues to devastate people’s lives. Funding for treatment of the disease has fallen sharply in the last year, leaving people without care or making them pay for it. MSF treated 23,000 people for cholera in 2012.

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII PhotoAt MSF’s cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince, the head doctor, who comes from Ghana, treated this emergency patient on Wednesday. People continue to deal with this deadly disease that first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. The photographer said: “It’s inspiring, though, knowing that every single person in the hospitalization ward will survive because they’re receiving medical attention. It’s been some time since I’ve worked with MSF, and I forgot how much I respect the organization and how moved I am by their work.”

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII Photo
At MSF’s cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince, the head doctor, who comes from Ghana, treated this emergency patient on Wednesday. People continue to deal with this deadly disease that first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. The photographer said: “It’s inspiring, though, knowing that every single person in the hospitalization ward will survive because they’re receiving medical attention. It’s been some time since I’ve worked with MSF, and I forgot how much I respect the organization and how moved I am by their work.”

A boy with asthma receives oxygen in the ER section of an MSF hospital in Syria. The dust had aggravated his asthma and he arrived unable to breathe. It was impossible for his parents to find an asthma inhaler in Syria. There are countless people affected by common health problems in Syria, pathologies that would be entirely manageable in normal settings but can quickly become deadly in the midst of a war, when the usual health care options are suddenly no longer available. Diabetes, hypertension, asthma, and maternal health complications are all taking their toll.
Photo by Robin Meldrum/MSF

A boy with asthma receives oxygen in the ER section of an MSF hospital in Syria. The dust had aggravated his asthma and he arrived unable to breathe. It was impossible for his parents to find an asthma inhaler in Syria. There are countless people affected by common health problems in Syria, pathologies that would be entirely manageable in normal settings but can quickly become deadly in the midst of a war, when the usual health care options are suddenly no longer available. Diabetes, hypertension, asthma, and maternal health complications are all taking their toll.

Photo by Robin Meldrum/MSF

Photo: Children wait to receive measles vaccinations. DRC 2008 © Anna Surinyach
Vaccines: Ensuring Sustainable Supplies
Over the last few years, new vaccines to fight an increased range of childhood diseases have come to market. These new products come at a time when there is a renewed focus and international commitment to ensure that children in developing countries are also able to benefit from full protection against childhood killer diseases.
But current vaccine supply and procurement practices are limiting countries’ ability to get the vaccines they want and need for their children. This is leading to vaccine shortages both at national and international level that could hamper global efforts to extend immunization to as many children as possible in developing countries.
The GAVI Alliance, a private-public partnership*, finances the introduction of new and underused vaccines in some of the world’s poorest countries. Read more about GAVI and access to vaccines.

Photo: Children wait to receive measles vaccinations. DRC 2008 © Anna Surinyach

Vaccines: Ensuring Sustainable Supplies

Over the last few years, new vaccines to fight an increased range of childhood diseases have come to market. These new products come at a time when there is a renewed focus and international commitment to ensure that children in developing countries are also able to benefit from full protection against childhood killer diseases.

But current vaccine supply and procurement practices are limiting countries’ ability to get the vaccines they want and need for their children. This is leading to vaccine shortages both at national and international level that could hamper global efforts to extend immunization to as many children as possible in developing countries.

The GAVI Alliance, a private-public partnership*, finances the introduction of new and underused vaccines in some of the world’s poorest countries. Read more about GAVI and access to vaccines.

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Above: Asha Jibril cares for her two-year-old daughter Aziza Haran in the ITFC at MSF’s field hospital in Batil camp. A lack of nutritious food and clean water have left Aziza severely acutely malnourished and severely dehydrated. 

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Above: Asha Jibril cares for her two-year-old daughter Aziza Haran in the ITFC at MSF’s field hospital in Batil camp. A lack of nutritious food and clean water have left Aziza severely acutely malnourished and severely dehydrated.

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.

Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Above: Two-year-old Lastman Muthko was brought to the MSF field hospital in Doro camp earlier this morning by his mother Mariam [left]. He is suffering from severe malaria and has had difficulty breathing.

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.Photo:South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Above: Two-year-old Lastman Muthko was brought to the MSF field hospital in Doro camp earlier this morning by his mother Mariam [left]. He is suffering from severe malaria and has had difficulty breathing.

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.

Photo:South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

“There are solutions for all these problems. It’s just that more needs to be done—fast”

“…And the situation here is desperate. The water is running out, and when it’s gone, that’s it—you’re going to have 35,000 people without water. People are right on the borderline now. We’ve managed to provide 2.5 liters (a little over half a gallon) per person yesterday and we’re hoping to get that up to 3 liters today, but that’s nowhere near enough, and the pond where we are treating and distributing water is running out. Without water, or even with a reduced amount of water, people are going to be in trouble. They need help.”

—Nurse Chiara Burzio is working at the MSF field hospital in Jamam refugee camp in Maban County, Upper Nile State, South Sudan.Photo:Refugees from Sudan have entered South Sudan’s Upper Nile State by the tens of thousands. Refugee camp sites are packed and water supplies are dwindling.
South Sudan 2012 © Hereward Holland

“There are solutions for all these problems. It’s just that more needs to be done—fast”

“…And the situation here is desperate. The water is running out, and when it’s gone, that’s it—you’re going to have 35,000 people without water.

People are right on the borderline now. We’ve managed to provide 2.5 liters (a little over half a gallon) per person yesterday and we’re hoping to get that up to 3 liters today, but that’s nowhere near enough, and the pond where we are treating and distributing water is running out. Without water, or even with a reduced amount of water, people are going to be in trouble. They need help.

—Nurse Chiara Burzio is working at the MSF field hospital in Jamam refugee camp in Maban County, Upper Nile State, South Sudan.

Photo:Refugees from Sudan have entered South Sudan’s Upper Nile State by the tens of thousands. Refugee camp sites are packed and water supplies are dwindling.

South Sudan 2012 © Hereward Holland

TELL CONGRESS TO IMPROVE FOOD AID FOR MALNOURISHED CHILDREN

Right now, the US Congress is considering changes to the Farm Bill, the law that dictates what kind of food aid assistance the US sends overseas. With better nutrition standards, US food aid could save more children suffering from malnutrition.TAKE ACTION! SIGN THE PETITION!photo: Burkina Faso © Jessica Dimmock

TELL CONGRESS TO IMPROVE FOOD AID FOR MALNOURISHED CHILDREN

Right now, the US Congress is considering changes to the Farm Bill, the law that dictates what kind of food aid assistance the US sends overseas. With better nutrition standards, US food aid could save more children suffering from malnutrition.

TAKE ACTION! SIGN THE PETITION!

photo: Burkina Faso © Jessica Dimmock

Access: The Novartis Drop the Case Campaign

The drug company Novartis is taking India to court to stop the production of affordable medicines by generic drug manufacturers. Millions of people in developing countries depend on these lifesaving medicines to stay alive and healthy. Ahead of the final hearing at India’s supreme court, join our campaign and call for a stop to this attack on generic medicines. Learn more.

Join in on the action and tweet this line:

Help #MSF protect access to affordable meds, tell @Novartis to drop its case vs #India http://ow.ly/8XPoQ #STOPnovartis

Photo: India 2007 © MSF

Access: The Novartis Drop the Case Campaign

The drug company Novartis is taking India to court to stop the production of affordable medicines by generic drug manufacturers. Millions of people in developing countries depend on these lifesaving medicines to stay alive and healthy. Ahead of the final hearing at India’s supreme court, join our campaign and call for a stop to this attack on generic medicines. Learn more.

Join in on the action and tweet this line:

Help #MSF protect access to affordable meds, tell @Novartis to drop its case vs #India http://ow.ly/8XPoQ #STOPnovartis

Photo: India 2007 © MSF

MSF took to the streets with 2,000 others in New Delhi warning that harmful provisions in a trade deal between the EU and India could severely hinder access to affordable medicine for people in developing countries.

For more information about the protest go here.

For more photographs from the demonstration go here.

Photo:India 2012 © Syddharth Singh

MSF took to the streets with 2,000 others in New Delhi warning that harmful provisions in a trade deal between the EU and India could severely hinder access to affordable medicine for people in developing countries.

For more information about the protest go here.

For more photographs from the demonstration go here.

Photo:India 2012 © Syddharth Singh

Lebanon: Healing Those Deeply Affected

Recently, with thousands of Syrians—many of whom have physical wounds—fleeing the violence in their country and seeking refuge in Lebanon, we dispatched medical teams to evaluate their health status. This resulted in our setting up a new health program in Wadi Khaled, in the north of Lebanon, in November 2011. We have been working in Lebanon for three years, and were therefore in a position to closely monitor the health situation for Syrians arriving in the country.

Read more about the work of MSF in Northern Lebanon here.

Photo: Lebanon 2010 © Dina Debbas

Lebanon: Healing Those Deeply Affected

Recently, with thousands of Syrians—many of whom have physical wounds—fleeing the violence in their country and seeking refuge in Lebanon, we dispatched medical teams to evaluate their health status. This resulted in our setting up a new health program in Wadi Khaled, in the north of Lebanon, in November 2011. We have been working in Lebanon for three years, and were therefore in a position to closely monitor the health situation for Syrians arriving in the country.

Read more about the work of MSF in Northern Lebanon here.

Photo: Lebanon 2010 © Dina Debbas