Posts tagged patients

Photo by Sven Torfinn
Swaziland is in the middle of a medical crisis. The highest HIV prevalence in the world and the emergence of drug-resistant TB threaten to have a disastrous effect on the social and economic situation there. 
Millions of people in developing countries are still waiting for the AIDS revolution. Join us for a Twitter chat on how millions of people are still waiting for the AIDS revolution: Friday, Dec. 6, 11am EST/5pm CET @MSF_SouthAfrica

Photo by Sven Torfinn

Swaziland is in the middle of a medical crisis. The highest HIV prevalence in the world and the emergence of drug-resistant TB threaten to have a disastrous effect on the social and economic situation there.

Millions of people in developing countries are still waiting for the AIDS revolution. Join us for a Twitter chat on how millions of people are still waiting for the AIDS revolution: Friday, Dec. 6, 11am EST/5pm CET @MSF_SouthAfrica

MSF & the Treatment Action Campaign rallied in front of the Africa IP Forum in Johannesburg, South Africa. We are calling for the South African government to fix its patent law to better protect access to affordable medicines.

MSF & the Treatment Action Campaign rallied in front of the Africa IP Forum in Johannesburg, South Africa. We are calling for the South African government to fix its patent law to better protect access to affordable medicines.

MSF in Mali: “We Will Not Abandon Our Patients Now”
In the town of Gao, in conflict-riven northern Mali, an average of 120 patients make their way to the MSF Wabaria and Sossokoira health centers each day. Even though the rainy season is over, 70 percent come with malaria, a potentially fatal parasitic disease that leaves sufferers exhausted from high fevers and uncontrollable shivers. Despite the war, it is malaria that the MSF medical teams in the region are battling most fiercely. It remains the leading cause of death in the country, and it is particularly dangerous for children under the age of five.
“Although there is a hospital and 10 health centers in and around Gao town, this is for a population of 400,000, and we realized that some people still had no access to medical care. Our patients tell us that all they hope for is peace. And we are with them; we stayed here throughout the air strikes, we will not abandon our patients now. We hope that the health system will develop and eventually replace us. But until then, we will stay and ensure that the people of Gao and Ansongo continue to have access to quality and free health care,” says Dr. Jose Bafoa, MSF’s medical team leader in Gao. 

MSF in Mali: “We Will Not Abandon Our Patients Now”

In the town of Gao, in conflict-riven northern Mali, an average of 120 patients make their way to the MSF Wabaria and Sossokoira health centers each day. Even though the rainy season is over, 70 percent come with malaria, a potentially fatal parasitic disease that leaves sufferers exhausted from high fevers and uncontrollable shivers. Despite the war, it is malaria that the MSF medical teams in the region are battling most fiercely. It remains the leading cause of death in the country, and it is particularly dangerous for children under the age of five.

“Although there is a hospital and 10 health centers in and around Gao town, this is for a population of 400,000, and we realized that some people still had no access to medical care. Our patients tell us that all they hope for is peace. And we are with them; we stayed here throughout the air strikes, we will not abandon our patients now. We hope that the health system will develop and eventually replace us. But until then, we will stay and ensure that the people of Gao and Ansongo continue to have access to quality and free health care,” says Dr. Jose Bafoa, MSF’s medical team leader in Gao. 

Every year, our annual report provides us with the opportunity to explain to our supporters how we have allocated your generous donations and to give you details about the lifesaving programs we’re running in clinics, hospitals, and feeding centers all across the globe. 

In short, it gives us the opportunity to be accountable to the people who make our work possible.

View our 2011 annual report.

The father has heard that foreigners come here and experiment on people. Rafiq, the first child we treated with drugs died and the mother reported to others that the drugs we gave Rafiq killed him. This leaves me deeply upset.

Dr. Kartik Chandaria is a doctor writing from Tajikistan where he is working to treat children with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. This is Kartik’s second mission as an MSF doctor. His first was in Liberia in 2007.

Check out his blog.