Posts tagged pakistan

Photo by Haroon Khan/MSF
MSF medical staff tend to a young patient in Karachi, Pakistan. The MSF clinic in Karachi provides basic health care and emergency services, including maternal healthcare, to people living in Machar Colony, a densely populated area that suffers from a lack of sanitation, high pollution, and few affordable health services.

Photo by Haroon Khan/MSF

MSF medical staff tend to a young patient in Karachi, Pakistan. The MSF clinic in Karachi provides basic health care and emergency services, including maternal healthcare, to people living in Machar Colony, a densely populated area that suffers from a lack of sanitation, high pollution, and few affordable health services.

Photo: MSF medical staff examines patient in surgical ward in Hangu Tehsil Headquarters (THQ) Hospital. MSF supports the Hangu THQ Hospital by running emergency room and providing surgical care. Pakistan 2012 © Haroon Khan/MSF
Pakistan: More than 110 Treated for Blast Wounds Ahead of Elections
Pakistan is experiencing an increase in violence related to the general and provincial elections taking place on May 11, in the country’s first democratic transition of power. MSF staff treated patients for blast injuries at facilities in Hangu and Lower Dir, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and Kurram Agency in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas.
"The escalation in violence has caused massive devastation over a short period of time," said Jean Guy Vataux, MSF country representative in Pakistan. "This is exacerbating an already very difficult situation for the Pakistani people who continue to bear the brunt of these violent acts on every level."
Noncombatants have been the primary victims of the recent violence, which follows several months of armed conflict in Pakistan that mainly injured members of the security forces and armed militants, according to Pakistani media reports.

Photo: MSF medical staff examines patient in surgical ward in Hangu Tehsil Headquarters (THQ) Hospital. MSF supports the Hangu THQ Hospital by running emergency room and providing surgical care. Pakistan 2012 © Haroon Khan/MSF

Pakistan: More than 110 Treated for Blast Wounds Ahead of Elections

Pakistan is experiencing an increase in violence related to the general and provincial elections taking place on May 11, in the country’s first democratic transition of power. MSF staff treated patients for blast injuries at facilities in Hangu and Lower Dir, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and Kurram Agency in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas.

"The escalation in violence has caused massive devastation over a short period of time," said Jean Guy Vataux, MSF country representative in Pakistan. "This is exacerbating an already very difficult situation for the Pakistani people who continue to bear the brunt of these violent acts on every level."

Noncombatants have been the primary victims of the recent violence, which follows several months of armed conflict in Pakistan that mainly injured members of the security forces and armed militants, according to Pakistani media reports.

Photo: MSF medical staff examine a patient in the surgical ward of Hangu Tehsil Headquarter(THQ) Hospital, Pakistan. December, 2011. © Haroon Khan/MSF
Pakistan: MSF treats wounded from bomb blast in Hangu
MSF treated 55 injured patients after a major explosion outside two mosques in Hangu, Pakistan. The bomb blast killed several and injured dozens of people leaving the mosques after Friday prayers. 
The explosion was close to the hospital, patients began arriving within minutes. Our medical team began to rapidly identify and give priority to patient’s medical needs according to the severity of their injuries. “We were racing against time to treat and stabilise the patients,” says MSF Project Coordinator, Cédric Linossier.

Photo: MSF medical staff examine a patient in the surgical ward of Hangu Tehsil Headquarter(THQ) Hospital, Pakistan. December, 2011. © Haroon Khan/MSF

Pakistan: MSF treats wounded from bomb blast in Hangu

MSF treated 55 injured patients after a major explosion outside two mosques in Hangu, Pakistan. The bomb blast killed several and injured dozens of people leaving the mosques after Friday prayers. 

The explosion was close to the hospital, patients began arriving within minutes. Our medical team began to rapidly identify and give priority to patient’s medical needs according to the severity of their injuries. “We were racing against time to treat and stabilise the patients,” says MSF Project Coordinator, Cédric Linossier.

Photo: MSF and Pakistani staff examine a patient in Dera Murad Jamali Hospital, where MSF is treating patients for measles-related complications. Pakistan 2011 © P.K. Lee/MSF
MSF Responds To Increase In Measles in Southwestern Pakistan
Cases of measles are on the rise in the eastern region of Pakistan’s Balochistan Province. An MSF medical team in Dera Murad Jamali has treated 159 patients since late December 2012, and two measles-related deaths have occurred in health facilities supported by MSF in the province’s Jaffarabad and Nasirabad districts.To cope with the increasing number of patients, an eight-bed isolation unit has been set up in Dera Murad Jamali Hospital to treat patients with complications. Some 35 complicated cases have been treated over the past two weeks. Treatment kits have been distributed to locations where MSF runs mobile clinics, including Mir Hassan, Usta Mohammad, Dera Allah Yar, and Sobhat Pur.
“Our mobile medical teams are reaching out to communities to identify patients with measles symptoms in the catchment area of our supported health facilities,” says Dr. Muhammad Shoaib, MSF’s medical coordinator in Pakistan. “Patients are then referred for treatment aimed at preventing complications such as respiratory infections.”There has been an increase in the number of recorded measles cases across Pakistan over the past two months. “Measles is an extremely contagious illness,” says Dr. Shoaib. “If not treated in time, it may result in serious medical complications and even death, especially amongst malnourished patients. In eastern Balochistan, where malnutrition rates are relatively high, the chance of complications is high.”

Photo: MSF and Pakistani staff examine a patient in Dera Murad Jamali Hospital, where MSF is treating patients for measles-related complications. Pakistan 2011 © P.K. Lee/MSF

MSF Responds To Increase In Measles in Southwestern Pakistan

Cases of measles are on the rise in the eastern region of Pakistan’s Balochistan Province. An MSF medical team in Dera Murad Jamali has treated 159 patients since late December 2012, and two measles-related deaths have occurred in health facilities supported by MSF in the province’s Jaffarabad and Nasirabad districts.

To cope with the increasing number of patients, an eight-bed isolation unit has been set up in Dera Murad Jamali Hospital to treat patients with complications. Some 35 complicated cases have been treated over the past two weeks. Treatment kits have been distributed to locations where MSF runs mobile clinics, including Mir Hassan, Usta Mohammad, Dera Allah Yar, and Sobhat Pur.

“Our mobile medical teams are reaching out to communities to identify patients with measles symptoms in the catchment area of our supported health facilities,” says Dr. Muhammad Shoaib, MSF’s medical coordinator in Pakistan. “Patients are then referred for treatment aimed at preventing complications such as respiratory infections.”

There has been an increase in the number of recorded measles cases across Pakistan over the past two months. “Measles is an extremely contagious illness,” says Dr. Shoaib. “If not treated in time, it may result in serious medical complications and even death, especially amongst malnourished patients. In eastern Balochistan, where malnutrition rates are relatively high, the chance of complications is high.”

Photo: The inpatient therapeutic feeding center in the Dera Murad Jamali District Headquarters Hospital in eastern Balochistan Pakistan 2011 © P.K. Lee/MSF
MSF Condemns Targeting of Health Workers in Pakistan
Regardless of the parties or individuals responsible for the recent escalation of attacks against health workers in Pakistan, both patients and medical workers risk losing their lives while seeking or providing health care.
As a medical humanitarian organization working in Pakistan since 1986, and currently operating activities throughout the country, MSF condemns the attacks on medical workers and strongly reiterates the need to fully respect the medical mission by ensuring the safety and security of patients, medical staff, and health facilities.
“A hospital or a vaccination site needs to be a safe location where medics can perform their duty, and patients can receive the urgent assistance they need,” said Arjan Hehenkamp, MSF general director. “We call on all actors to restore the respect for the medical act.”
Acceptance from all communities and political and military groups is the only way medical actors, including MSF, can work in Pakistan. This acceptance is based on the fact that medical activities have a singular objective: the provision of impartial medical care to anyone in need, and based on need alone.
Already fragile perception and acceptance of vaccination in Pakistan was further undermined last year by the alleged misuse of vaccinations by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, in its attempt to gather intelligence leading to the killing of Osama Bin Laden.
MSF does not carry out mass vaccination campaigns in the country, despite the significant need for them.
“The reality is that in our facilities, we are treating people suffering from preventable conditions,” said Hehenkamp. “Part of the solution is to conduct mass vaccinations, but we simply cannot consider it within this climate of rumors and suspicion, which is deadly for both patients and health workers.”
Since 1986, MSF has been working in Pakistan with Pakistani communities and Afghan refugees who are survivors of armed conflict and natural disasters, or who lack access to medical care. MSF teams provide free emergency medical care in Kurram Agency in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas, and in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Balochistan, and Sindh provinces.

Photo: The inpatient therapeutic feeding center in the Dera Murad Jamali District Headquarters Hospital in eastern Balochistan Pakistan 2011 © P.K. Lee/MSF

MSF Condemns Targeting of Health Workers in Pakistan

Regardless of the parties or individuals responsible for the recent escalation of attacks against health workers in Pakistan, both patients and medical workers risk losing their lives while seeking or providing health care.

As a medical humanitarian organization working in Pakistan since 1986, and currently operating activities throughout the country, MSF condemns the attacks on medical workers and strongly reiterates the need to fully respect the medical mission by ensuring the safety and security of patients, medical staff, and health facilities.

“A hospital or a vaccination site needs to be a safe location where medics can perform their duty, and patients can receive the urgent assistance they need,” said Arjan Hehenkamp, MSF general director. “We call on all actors to restore the respect for the medical act.”

Acceptance from all communities and political and military groups is the only way medical actors, including MSF, can work in Pakistan. This acceptance is based on the fact that medical activities have a singular objective: the provision of impartial medical care to anyone in need, and based on need alone.

Already fragile perception and acceptance of vaccination in Pakistan was further undermined last year by the alleged misuse of vaccinations by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, in its attempt to gather intelligence leading to the killing of Osama Bin Laden.

MSF does not carry out mass vaccination campaigns in the country, despite the significant need for them.

“The reality is that in our facilities, we are treating people suffering from preventable conditions,” said Hehenkamp. “Part of the solution is to conduct mass vaccinations, but we simply cannot consider it within this climate of rumors and suspicion, which is deadly for both patients and health workers.”

Since 1986, MSF has been working in Pakistan with Pakistani communities and Afghan refugees who are survivors of armed conflict and natural disasters, or who lack access to medical care. MSF teams provide free emergency medical care in Kurram Agency in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas, and in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Balochistan, and Sindh provinces.

Photo: Patients queue for medical attention outside an MSF tent at a mobile health clinic and ambulatory therapeutic feeding center in a camp for people displaced by the floods in Dera Murad Jamali. Pakistan 2012 © Fathema Murtaza
Voices From the Field: “There Are Thousands of Families Who Lost Their Homes Because of the Floods”

Amina’s StoryAmina*, mother to a one-month-old baby boy, shares her story on how her child came to be admitted to MSF’s hospital in Dera Murad Jamali. Her son was brought to the MSF nursery when he was 10 days old; weighing only 2.36 kilograms [about five pounds] he was diagnosed with tetanus.
“I have been married for two years; this little boy is my first child. I haven’t named him yet—I was not sure if he would survive. I like the name Yaseen, maybe that will be his name. 
We have no shade, no home or land; we live on the side of the road and use our beds as a tent. I delivered him under a makeshift tent near the Pat Feeder Canal. There are thousands of families who lost their homes because of the floods and are now living there too.
My husband, Saeed*, used to work on our landlord’s land. But the water came; it was shoulder high and we lost everything, even the food we had stored is lost.
Our landlord came down from Karachi to ensure the water was drained from his land so we could return to it. We don’t have anything to rebuild with and the landlord gave us nothing. He has gone back to Karachi. We are still hopeful that we will get some help.
When my son got sick, I pawned my earrings because we had nothing left to pay the doctors, however, when we came to the hospital here, we were told the treatment in the hospital is free! So, I used the money from the earrings to buy food for our family instead. It’s been a month since I sold my earrings, and now even the food is gone.
A few days after my son was born, he started having fits and had a temperature. We went to a private clinic where they said they couldn’t help us, but told us that we should take our son to the MSF hospital because they have a lot of facilities. So we brought him here. My son has been here for 25 days now.
Before I brought my son to the hospital he was not drinking any milk; he wasn’t even able to cry. He is my first child. I worry about him—and wonder if he will survive. We had thought about taking him from the hospital and going home because we didn’t see an immediate change in his health at first.Now, though, he opens his eyes. The nurses have explained that my son can be treated and can now slowly start to feed. 
Change has happened. My son is better. Now we are going to be patient and let the medical staff tell us when our son is ready to leave. I am very relieved and happy to see my son getting better. When I am able to take him home, I plan to celebrate by providing food to people who are poor and less fortunate than my family and me. We may not have anything, but at least we have our son. ‘Only Allah can help us now.’
We are glad we were able to access such good health care, and we know that it has saved our son.
*Names have been changed to protect patient’s anonymity. 

Photo: Patients queue for medical attention outside an MSF tent at a mobile health clinic and ambulatory therapeutic feeding center in a camp for people displaced by the floods in Dera Murad Jamali. Pakistan 2012 © Fathema Murtaza

Voices From the Field: “There Are Thousands of Families Who Lost Their Homes Because of the Floods”


Amina’s Story
Amina*, mother to a one-month-old baby boy, shares her story on how her child came to be admitted to MSF’s hospital in Dera Murad Jamali. Her son was brought to the MSF nursery when he was 10 days old; weighing only 2.36 kilograms [about five pounds] he was diagnosed with tetanus.

“I have been married for two years; this little boy is my first child. I haven’t named him yet—I was not sure if he would survive. I like the name Yaseen, maybe that will be his name. 

We have no shade, no home or land; we live on the side of the road and use our beds as a tent. I delivered him under a makeshift tent near the Pat Feeder Canal. There are thousands of families who lost their homes because of the floods and are now living there too.

My husband, Saeed*, used to work on our landlord’s land. But the water came; it was shoulder high and we lost everything, even the food we had stored is lost.

Our landlord came down from Karachi to ensure the water was drained from his land so we could return to it. We don’t have anything to rebuild with and the landlord gave us nothing. He has gone back to Karachi. We are still hopeful that we will get some help.

When my son got sick, I pawned my earrings because we had nothing left to pay the doctors, however, when we came to the hospital here, we were told the treatment in the hospital is free! So, I used the money from the earrings to buy food for our family instead. It’s been a month since I sold my earrings, and now even the food is gone.

A few days after my son was born, he started having fits and had a temperature. We went to a private clinic where they said they couldn’t help us, but told us that we should take our son to the MSF hospital because they have a lot of facilities. So we brought him here. My son has been here for 25 days now.

Before I brought my son to the hospital he was not drinking any milk; he wasn’t even able to cry. He is my first child. I worry about him—and wonder if he will survive. We had thought about taking him from the hospital and going home because we didn’t see an immediate change in his health at first.Now, though, he opens his eyes. The nurses have explained that my son can be treated and can now slowly start to feed. 

Change has happened. My son is better. Now we are going to be patient and let the medical staff tell us when our son is ready to leave. I am very relieved and happy to see my son getting better. When I am able to take him home, I plan to celebrate by providing food to people who are poor and less fortunate than my family and me. We may not have anything, but at least we have our son. ‘Only Allah can help us now.’

We are glad we were able to access such good health care, and we know that it has saved our son.

*Names have been changed to protect patient’s anonymity. 

Photo: A child is measured with a middle upper arm circumference band by MSF health staff in order to check for malnutrition at a mobile health clinic and ambulatory therapeutic feeding clinic in Dera Murad Jamali. Pakistan 2012 © Fathema Murtaza/MSF
MSF Responds to Post-Flood Needs in Pakistan
The needs become apparent as heavy monsoon rains flooded the town of Dera Murad Jumali and surrounding areas, forcing thousands of families to abandon their homes and seek shelter on the sides of roads in makeshift tents. In response, MSF’s team in Dera Murad Jamali is now supplying water to 20 water tanks and two 15 cubic meter water bladders to ensure that there is safe drinking water for thousands of people who otherwise cannot access it. MSF is providing more than 650,000 liters of clean drinking water to the displaced people every day.

Photo: A child is measured with a middle upper arm circumference band by MSF health staff in order to check for malnutrition at a mobile health clinic and ambulatory therapeutic feeding clinic in Dera Murad Jamali. Pakistan 2012 © Fathema Murtaza/MSF

MSF Responds to Post-Flood Needs in Pakistan

The needs become apparent as heavy monsoon rains flooded the town of Dera Murad Jumali and surrounding areas, forcing thousands of families to abandon their homes and seek shelter on the sides of roads in makeshift tents. In response, MSF’s team in Dera Murad Jamali is now supplying water to 20 water tanks and two 15 cubic meter water bladders to ensure that there is safe drinking water for thousands of people who otherwise cannot access it. MSF is providing more than 650,000 liters of clean drinking water to the displaced people every day.

Photo: The emergency department of the District Headquarters Hospital in Timergara. Pakistan 2012 © P.K. Lee/MSF 
MSF Works to Stop Spread of Post-Monsoon Ailments in Pakistan
A monsoon in Pakistan caused an increase in waterborne disease cases due to unclean drinking water, poor sanitation, and poor hygiene conditions. We’ve set up temporary centers and 2,840 patients have received treatment since July.
“Although acute watery diarrhea is an easily treatable disease,” says MSF medical coordinator Dr. Jacob Maikere, “it can spread quickly, so prevention is as important as treatment. Access to improved sanitation facilities and clean water are vital [in order] to mitigate the spread of waterborne diseases like this.”

Photo: The emergency department of the District Headquarters Hospital in Timergara. Pakistan 2012 © P.K. Lee/MSF

MSF Works to Stop Spread of Post-Monsoon Ailments in Pakistan

A monsoon in Pakistan caused an increase in waterborne disease cases due to unclean drinking water, poor sanitation, and poor hygiene conditions. We’ve set up temporary centers and 2,840 patients have received treatment since July.

“Although acute watery diarrhea is an easily treatable disease,” says MSF medical coordinator Dr. Jacob Maikere, “it can spread quickly, so prevention is as important as treatment. Access to improved sanitation facilities and clean water are vital [in order] to mitigate the spread of waterborne diseases like this.”


Introducing a New Concept: Mental Health Support in Northwestern Pakistan


“I still remember there was a big bomb blast in April 2010, about 300 meters [about 984 feet] away from our hospital. Within a few minutes, dozens of injured patients were already outside the emergency room. We needed to quickly identify who needed to be attended first,” recalls Dr. Muhammad Zaher, who is working with Doctors Without Borders as assistant medical focal person in Timergara, in the Lower Dir district of northwestern Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) province.
Mental health services are scarce in Pakistan, and Lower Dir is no exception. There are very few psychologists for the district’s estimated population of 1.2 million people. Indeed, the MSF team in Lower Dir knows of only one.

In response to this situation, MSF started providing mental health counseling and psychosocial support in the hospital in February 2012.

The mental health team is made up of both male and female staff. They provide individual and group counseling to patients referred from the mother-and-child health department, the emergency department, and the post-operative wards.
Photo: An MSF staff member and a young patient in the triage area of the DHQ hospital in Timergara
Pakistan 2012 © P.K. Lee/MSF

Introducing a New Concept: Mental Health Support in Northwestern Pakistan

“I still remember there was a big bomb blast in April 2010, about 300 meters [about 984 feet] away from our hospital. Within a few minutes, dozens of injured patients were already outside the emergency room. We needed to quickly identify who needed to be attended first,” recalls Dr. Muhammad Zaher, who is working with Doctors Without Borders as assistant medical focal person in Timergara, in the Lower Dir district of northwestern Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) province.

Mental health services are scarce in Pakistan, and Lower Dir is no exception. There are very few psychologists for the district’s estimated population of 1.2 million people. Indeed, the MSF team in Lower Dir knows of only one.

In response to this situation, MSF started providing mental health counseling and psychosocial support in the hospital in February 2012.

The mental health team is made up of both male and female staff. They provide individual and group counseling to patients referred from the mother-and-child health department, the emergency department, and the post-operative wards.

Photo: An MSF staff member and a young patient in the triage area of the DHQ hospital in Timergara
Pakistan 2012 © P.K. Lee/MSF

Pakistan: Delivering in the Dark

The next video in MSF’s International Women’s Day series takes us to MSF’s birthing unit in Kuchlak, in Pakistan’s Balochistan Province, to which women travel long distances for crucial care they’d otherwise go without.

View MSF’s International Women’s Day video on Haiti.

View the International Women’s Day video on South Sudan.

Karachi, Pakistan has one of Asia’s largest slum populations. Fifty percent of the city’s inhabitants live in cramped, unhygienic conditions with poor access to water and medical care. Such conditions are a breeding ground for the spread of infectious diseases that are otherwise easily preventable. 

Urban Survivors is a multimedia project by Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in collaboration with the NOOR photo agency and Darjeeling Productions, highlighting the critical humanitarian and medical needs that exist in slums the world over.

Photo: © Alixandra Fazzina/NOOR

Karachi, Pakistan has one of Asia’s largest slum populations. Fifty percent of the city’s inhabitants live in cramped, unhygienic conditions with poor access to water and medical care. Such conditions are a breeding ground for the spread of infectious diseases that are otherwise easily preventable.

Urban Survivors is a multimedia project by Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in collaboration with the NOOR photo agency and Darjeeling Productions, highlighting the critical humanitarian and medical needs that exist in slums the world over.

Photo: © Alixandra Fazzina/NOOR

Though the security situation in Hangu, Pakistan remains tense, Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) continues to work inside the Hangu Tehsil Headquarters (THQ) hospital, where it has been since May 2010.

In 2011, MSF provided medical care to more than 20,088 patients in the emergency room and conducted 955 emergency surgeries in the hospital’s operating theater. Throughout 2011, the MSF medical team also referred more than 452 patients to Peshawar for specialized surgical and medical care. From July to October—the rainy season—MSF treated 1,526 patients with acute watery diarrhea. In light of the area’s ongoing medical needs, MSF will continue to provide free emergency medical care in 2012.

Photo: Pakistan 2011 © P.K. Lee/MSF

Though the security situation in Hangu, Pakistan remains tense, Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) continues to work inside the Hangu Tehsil Headquarters (THQ) hospital, where it has been since May 2010.

In 2011, MSF provided medical care to more than 20,088 patients in the emergency room and conducted 955 emergency surgeries in the hospital’s operating theater. Throughout 2011, the MSF medical team also referred more than 452 patients to Peshawar for specialized surgical and medical care. From July to October—the rainy season—MSF treated 1,526 patients with acute watery diarrhea. In light of the area’s ongoing medical needs, MSF will continue to provide free emergency medical care in 2012.

Photo: Pakistan 2011 © P.K. Lee/MSF

In Somalia, Maryan walked ten miles with her malnourished child on her back to get lifesaving emergency care. Two-year-old Deng was brought to a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in South Sudan where he was treated for kala azar – a deadly tropical disease. Sanna was pregnant when the floods in Pakistan hit and left her without clean water or food. 

Together, Doctors Without Borders and our donors provided these women and children and many thousands of people like them with the emergency medical care they needed to survive. But as we head into 2012, your support is critical as we prepare to respond to the medical needs of people facing natural disasters, deadly diseases and conflict. 

Will you help us save more lives in the year to come?

In Somalia, Maryan walked ten miles with her malnourished child on her back to get lifesaving emergency care. Two-year-old Deng was brought to a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in South Sudan where he was treated for kala azar – a deadly tropical disease. Sanna was pregnant when the floods in Pakistan hit and left her without clean water or food.

Together, Doctors Without Borders and our donors provided these women and children and many thousands of people like them with the emergency medical care they needed to survive. But as we head into 2012, your support is critical as we prepare to respond to the medical needs of people facing natural disasters, deadly diseases and conflict.

Will you help us save more lives in the year to come?

Standing there, you could see a partially submerged school and mosque, along with the other buildings in the village. It was complete devastation.

Dr. James Kambaki, MSF project coordinator, on the scene in Pakistan after massive floods hit

Read more in the 2010 Annual Report

Karachi, Pakistan has one of Asia’s largest slum populations. Fifty percent of the city’s inhabitants live in cramped, unhygienic conditions with poor access to water and medical care. Such conditions are a breeding ground for the spread of infectious diseases that are otherwise easily preventable.

Urban Survivors is a multimedia project by Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in collaboration with the NOOR photo agency and Darjeeling Productions, highlighting the critical humanitarian and medical needs that exist in slums the world over.

Photo: © Alixandra Fazzina/NOOR

Karachi, Pakistan has one of Asia’s largest slum populations. Fifty percent of the city’s inhabitants live in cramped, unhygienic conditions with poor access to water and medical care. Such conditions are a breeding ground for the spread of infectious diseases that are otherwise easily preventable.

Urban Survivors is a multimedia project by Doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in collaboration with the NOOR photo agency and Darjeeling Productions, highlighting the critical humanitarian and medical needs that exist in slums the world over.

Photo: © Alixandra Fazzina/NOOR