Posts tagged niger

Photo: In the Madaoua and Bouza districts of Niger, there were an average of seven deaths for every 10,000 children every day last year. More than half of the deaths were due to malaria. © Juan-Carlos Tomasi
A Vicious Cycle in Sahel
Malaria and malnutrition are closely related. This is played out dramatically in Africa’s Sahel region during the “hunger gap” months. Food stocks run low and new crops are not ready for harvest, so malnutrition is at its peak; meanwhile, the rainy season, when mosquitoes breed, is in full swing. The diseases combine in a vicious circle: malnourished children with weak immune systems can’t fight diseases including malaria; children sick with malaria are more likely to become dangerously malnourished.

Photo: In the Madaoua and Bouza districts of Niger, there were an average of seven deaths for every 10,000 children every day last year. More than half of the deaths were due to malaria. © Juan-Carlos Tomasi

A Vicious Cycle in Sahel

Malaria and malnutrition are closely related. This is played out dramatically in Africa’s Sahel region during the “hunger gap” months. Food stocks run low and new crops are not ready for harvest, so malnutrition is at its peak; meanwhile, the rainy season, when mosquitoes breed, is in full swing. The diseases combine in a vicious circle: malnourished children with weak immune systems can’t fight diseases including malaria; children sick with malaria are more likely to become dangerously malnourished.

Photo: Some parting words from Port Harcourt to thank MSF for its work there.
Tears and Thanks
MSF began its TEME Clinic, Port Harcourt operations in 2005 and would still continue even with the resolution of the initial challenge which had led to their coming. From its earliest operations until it would announce its plans to leave from the Niger Delta (in October 2012 and final pull-out in March 2013) following the return of peace and after a commendable seven-year commitment to the health emergencies, over 13, 000 persons have been so treated in skin crafting, bullet wounds, damages to borne resulting mostly from motorcycle accidents and so on.
"On behalf of Port Harcourt People, the Niger Delta People and Nigeria at large, we say THANK YOU."
And on behalf of MSF, we say THANK YOU to our field staff, local staff, our donors, supporters, and the people of Port Harcourt for allowing us to be there.

Photo: Some parting words from Port Harcourt to thank MSF for its work there.

Tears and Thanks

MSF began its TEME Clinic, Port Harcourt operations in 2005 and would still continue even with the resolution of the initial challenge which had led to their coming. From its earliest operations until it would announce its plans to leave from the Niger Delta (in October 2012 and final pull-out in March 2013) following the return of peace and after a commendable seven-year commitment to the health emergencies, over 13, 000 persons have been so treated in skin crafting, bullet wounds, damages to borne resulting mostly from motorcycle accidents and so on.

"On behalf of Port Harcourt People, the Niger Delta People and Nigeria at large, we say THANK YOU."

And on behalf of MSF, we say THANK YOU to our field staff, local staff, our donors, supporters, and the people of Port Harcourt for allowing us to be there.

Treating Those Caught In Mali’s Armed Conflict

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams have remained in northern Mali throughout the recent crisis in order provide medical care to the local population. MSF has treated 35 wounded patients in Timbuktu over the past few weeks and is running programs in Mauritania, Niger, and Burkina Faso to assist those fleeing the conflict.

Photo: Mothers and children queue to receive food as part of treatment in Guidan Roumdji, where MSF treats malnutrition and malaria. Niger 2012 © Tanya Bindra
Op-Ed: How to Start a Child Survival Epidemic
“Running your infant to the pediatrician for a well-baby check up and shots may seem like just another chore. Who do you know who ever had measles? Many parents wonder if all those shots are really necessary in the first place. But last week, mothers, nurses, and doctors in Niger reminded me just how powerful and important these simple gestures are.”
How can improving childhood survival rates in Niger spread to a child survival epidemic? MSF pediatrician, Susan Shephered, discusses her work in the field and strategies to reduce childhood mortality worldwide. 
This article was originally published on the Huffington Post.

Photo: Mothers and children queue to receive food as part of treatment in Guidan Roumdji, where MSF treats malnutrition and malaria. Niger 2012 © Tanya Bindra

Op-Ed: How to Start a Child Survival Epidemic

Running your infant to the pediatrician for a well-baby check up and shots may seem like just another chore. Who do you know who ever had measles? Many parents wonder if all those shots are really necessary in the first place. But last week, mothers, nurses, and doctors in Niger reminded me just how powerful and important these simple gestures are.”

How can improving childhood survival rates in Niger spread to a child survival epidemic? MSF pediatrician, Susan Shephered, discusses her work in the field and strategies to reduce childhood mortality worldwide. 

This article was originally published on the Huffington Post.

Photo: A young mother stands outside of a MSF tent in Niger, where her baby has been admitted for severe malnutrition. © Tanya Bindra/Al Jazeera

Hunger Stalks Niger

About six million people are at risk of going hungry in Niger due to population growth, rising prices for staple foods, and lack of basic healthcare. Individual family efforts to make ends meet are faltering, as the queue of undernourished mothers and children continue to grow at relief camps.

More photos of the hunger battle here.

Photo: A young mother stands outside of a MSF tent in Niger, where her baby has been admitted for severe malnutrition. © Tanya Bindra/Al Jazeera

Hunger Stalks Niger

About six million people are at risk of going hungry in Niger due to population growth, rising prices for staple foods, and lack of basic healthcare. Individual family efforts to make ends meet are faltering, as the queue of undernourished mothers and children continue to grow at relief camps.

More photos of the hunger battle here.

Fighting Double Impact of Malnutrition and Malaria in Niger

A food crisis is affecting an estimated 18 million people across Africa’s Sahel region right now, including in Niger, where 4 million children are projected to suffer from acute malnutrition, with at least 1 million at risk of developing severe acute malnutrition. At the same time, 80 percent of children who come to MSF clinics in Niger test positive for malaria. MSF is trying to reach those who need help the most.

(Source: doctorswithoutborders.org)

Interview: Niger’s Very Large But Sadly “Normal” Malnutrition Situation


A complex series of nutritional crises is unfolding across the nations of Africa’s Sahel region. MSF director of operations Dr. Jean-Clément Cabrol has just returned from southern Niger. In this interview, he describes what he found and why a new approach is needed to treat the children who bear the brunt of the region’s chronic food insecurity.Is there a food crisis in Niger?If you’re asking if the situation is exceptional, then the answer is no. In Niger, food access problems that trigger widespread malnutrition are unfortunately recurrent. In 2011, which was not even considered a crisis year, more than 300,000 severely malnourished children were treated throughout Niger, and not only by MSF. This year, that figure could reach 390,000.Read the rest of the interview here.

Photo: A child is weighed at the MSF integrated health center in Dakoro District, Maradi region.
Niger 2012 © Julie Remy

Interview: Niger’s Very Large But Sadly “Normal” Malnutrition Situation

A complex series of nutritional crises is unfolding across the nations of Africa’s Sahel region. MSF director of operations Dr. Jean-Clément Cabrol has just returned from southern Niger. In this interview, he describes what he found and why a new approach is needed to treat the children who bear the brunt of the region’s chronic food insecurity.

Is there a food crisis in Niger?
If you’re asking if the situation is exceptional, then the answer is no. In Niger, food access problems that trigger widespread malnutrition are unfortunately recurrent. In 2011, which was not even considered a crisis year, more than 300,000 severely malnourished children were treated throughout Niger, and not only by MSF. This year, that figure could reach 390,000.

Read the rest of the interview here. Photo: A child is weighed at the MSF integrated health center in Dakoro District, Maradi region.
Niger 2012 © Julie Remy

Malnutrition in the Sahel: One Million Children Treated, But What’s Next?In this interview, MSF pediatrician Susan Shepherd and MSF nutrition specialist Stéphane Doyon Discuss the situation in the Sahel RegionOne million children suffering from severe malnutrition will be treated this year by governments and aid organizations across the Sahel. How should we interpret this number?Susan Shepherd: It’s both a failure and a success. The failure is that each year, countries within the Sahel will face recurrent, large-scale nutritional crises that are growing even worse in some countries. One million malnourished children—that’s an enormous figure. But the most important take away from this year is how all of the aid actors—governments, United Nations agencies, and NGOs—have managed the crisis. Because of this, the major success is that for the first time, one million malnourished children will be treated in the Sahel, and the vast majority of these one million children will recover.Stéphane Doyon: Prior to the 2005 nutrition crisis in Niger, malnourished children didn’t receive treatment and childhood malnutrition was virtually unrecognized. One million malnourished children receiving treatment doesn’t necessarily imply things are getting worse, but rather implies a major step forward in treatment. Improved malnutrition management results in large part from the political will summoned by the governments who wish to tackle this pathology. For the first time since the 2005 nutritional crisis in Niger, the most-affected countries have implemented ambitious response plans for treating malnourished children and establishing early preventive measures. Donors have committed to funding programs for therapeutic foods and nutritional supplements that are adapted to the needs of infants, even if all the funds have not yet been released.Read the rest of this interview here. 

Photo:A mother and her two-year-old await treatment at an MSF Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Center in Niger.

Niger March 2012 © Julie Remy

Malnutrition in the Sahel: One Million Children Treated, But What’s Next?

In this interview, MSF pediatrician Susan Shepherd and MSF nutrition specialist Stéphane Doyon Discuss the situation in the Sahel Region

One million children suffering from severe malnutrition will be treated this year by governments and aid organizations across the Sahel. How should we interpret this number?

Susan Shepherd: It’s both a failure and a success. The failure is that each year, countries within the Sahel will face recurrent, large-scale nutritional crises that are growing even worse in some countries. One million malnourished children—that’s an enormous figure. But the most important take away from this year is how all of the aid actors—governments, United Nations agencies, and NGOs—have managed the crisis. Because of this, the major success is that for the first time, one million malnourished children will be treated in the Sahel, and the vast majority of these one million children will recover.

Stéphane Doyon: Prior to the 2005 nutrition crisis in Niger, malnourished children didn’t receive treatment and childhood malnutrition was virtually unrecognized. One million malnourished children receiving treatment doesn’t necessarily imply things are getting worse, but rather implies a major step forward in treatment. Improved malnutrition management results in large part from the political will summoned by the governments who wish to tackle this pathology. For the first time since the 2005 nutritional crisis in Niger, the most-affected countries have implemented ambitious response plans for treating malnourished children and establishing early preventive measures. Donors have committed to funding programs for therapeutic foods and nutritional supplements that are adapted to the needs of infants, even if all the funds have not yet been released.

Read the rest of this interview here.

Photo:A mother and her two-year-old await treatment at an MSF Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Center in Niger.

Niger March 2012 © Julie Remy

Mali: Refugees in a Vulnerable Situation

A political crisis has divided Mali since the end of January. People displaced by conflict are leaving the north of the country; hiding in the bush or fleeing en masse to Burkina Faso, Niger, and Mauritania. Often they settle in places where people are already living—places that have already been weakened by food insecurity in the region. MSF is responding to the growing humanitarian need in the region, providing assistance to refugees as well as to local people.

MSF is responding to the needs of vulnerable people by supporting health centers in Burkina Faso (Gandafabou, Férrerio), Mauritania (Fassala, Mbéra, Bassikounou), and Niger (Chinagodar, Bani Bangou, Yassan). Every week, MSF’s mobile clinics treat people in refugee camps in Burkina Faso (Dibissi, Ngatoutou-Niénié, Déou) and Niger (Ayorou, Maigaïzé, Bani Bangou, Abala, Gaoudel, and Nbeidou). Since February, MSF medical teams have carried out more than 23,000 consultations in the border regions of Mali. “We are mainly seeing respiratory infections, malaria, and diarrhea,” says Férir. “These problems are often due to the very bad conditions that the refugees are living in.” MSF teams are also treating a large number of women in need of obstetric care. One hundred women have given birth in the MSF health post in Mbera camp in Mauritania.Photo: Malian refugees in a makeshift shelter in Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso 2012 © Aurelie Baumel/MSF

Mali: Refugees in a Vulnerable Situation

A political crisis has divided Mali since the end of January. People displaced by conflict are leaving the north of the country; hiding in the bush or fleeing en masse to Burkina Faso, Niger, and Mauritania. Often they settle in places where people are already living—places that have already been weakened by food insecurity in the region. MSF is responding to the growing humanitarian need in the region, providing assistance to refugees as well as to local people.

MSF is responding to the needs of vulnerable people by supporting health centers in Burkina Faso (Gandafabou, Férrerio), Mauritania (Fassala, Mbéra, Bassikounou), and Niger (Chinagodar, Bani Bangou, Yassan). Every week, MSF’s mobile clinics treat people in refugee camps in Burkina Faso (Dibissi, Ngatoutou-Niénié, Déou) and Niger (Ayorou, Maigaïzé, Bani Bangou, Abala, Gaoudel, and Nbeidou). Since February, MSF medical teams have carried out more than 23,000 consultations in the border regions of Mali. “We are mainly seeing respiratory infections, malaria, and diarrhea,” says Férir. “These problems are often due to the very bad conditions that the refugees are living in.” MSF teams are also treating a large number of women in need of obstetric care. One hundred women have given birth in the MSF health post in Mbera camp in Mauritania.

Photo: Malian refugees in a makeshift shelter in Burkina Faso Burkina Faso 2012 © Aurelie Baumel/MSF

International Aid Remains Insufficient for 160,000 Malian Refugees

Nearly 160,000 Malians have fled their country for camps in Burkina Faso, Mauritania, and Niger. While instability persists in Mali, another threat looms: the rainy season, which will further complicate the deployment of aid.

The Mali-Niger border and the Tillabéry region


MSF Brings Medical Assistance to Malian Refugees in Niger


As a result of violence in Mali, nearly 10,000 Malians have sought refuge in the Tillabéry region of neighboring Niger, the medical humanitarian organization MSF said today. However, instead of finding relief, they are now living in extreme vulnerability in very poor conditions.

“Refugees currently have no access to drinking water, food, latrines, or proper shelter, and [they] have no access to basic health care,” said Benoît Kayembé, MSF head of mission in Niger.

“We’re in emergency mode,” he added. “The Tillabéry region was already facing an uncertain situation in terms of food security, and this is being exacerbated by the arrival of thousands of refugees.”

For more on the situation there click here.

The Mali-Niger border and the Tillabéry region


MSF Brings Medical Assistance to Malian Refugees in Niger


As a result of violence in Mali, nearly 10,000 Malians have sought refuge in the Tillabéry region of neighboring Niger, the medical humanitarian organization MSF said today. However, instead of finding relief, they are now living in extreme vulnerability in very poor conditions.

“Refugees currently have no access to drinking water, food, latrines, or proper shelter, and [they] have no access to basic health care,” said Benoît Kayembé, MSF head of mission in Niger.

“We’re in emergency mode,” he added. “The Tillabéry region was already facing an uncertain situation in terms of food security, and this is being exacerbated by the arrival of thousands of refugees.”

For more on the situation there click here.

Access to Essential Medicines: Ten Stories That Mattered in 2011

9. Too many Children Suffering From Malnutrition Go Unnoticed Outside Emergency Hot Spots

Each year, malnutrition claims millions of children’s lives—but this year, the world’s attention was drawn to the dramatic numbers of children suffering from malnutrition as the refugee crisis in the Horn of Africa unfolded. Thousands of Somali families fled their homes for refugee camps in neighboring countries, triggering a massive aid operation to provide them with emergency food aid.

However emergencies—while attention-grabbing—are only part of a much larger story of on-going childhood malnutrition that occurs outside the media spotlight in areas like South Asia and Africa.

Providing nutritious food to young children is the cornerstone of every attempt to fight malnutrition in both rich and developing countries. In 2010, MSF witnessed a reduction by half in the mortality among children in Niger who received nutrient-dense foods as part of supplementary feeding programs. Niger has undertaken large-scale distributions of supplementary foods for children under two at risk of malnutrition in both 2010 and 2011.

Improvements in the way we tackle childhood malnutrition are clearly underway, but more efforts are needed to ensure that nutritious food reaches all vulnerable young children wherever they live, and not just those in emergency hot spots.

Photo: Niger 2010 © Yann Libessart/MSF

Access to Essential Medicines: Ten Stories That Mattered in 2011

9. Too many Children Suffering From Malnutrition Go Unnoticed Outside Emergency Hot Spots

Each year, malnutrition claims millions of children’s lives—but this year, the world’s attention was drawn to the dramatic numbers of children suffering from malnutrition as the refugee crisis in the Horn of Africa unfolded. Thousands of Somali families fled their homes for refugee camps in neighboring countries, triggering a massive aid operation to provide them with emergency food aid.

However emergencies—while attention-grabbing—are only part of a much larger story of on-going childhood malnutrition that occurs outside the media spotlight in areas like South Asia and Africa.

Providing nutritious food to young children is the cornerstone of every attempt to fight malnutrition in both rich and developing countries. In 2010, MSF witnessed a reduction by half in the mortality among children in Niger who received nutrient-dense foods as part of supplementary feeding programs. Niger has undertaken large-scale distributions of supplementary foods for children under two at risk of malnutrition in both 2010 and 2011.

Improvements in the way we tackle childhood malnutrition are clearly underway, but more efforts are needed to ensure that nutritious food reaches all vulnerable young children wherever they live, and not just those in emergency hot spots.

Photo: Niger 2010 © Yann Libessart/MSF

It’s time to stop applying different standards for children living in malnutrition hotspots. We can save children’s lives today if the appropriate resources are put behind similar interventions to those we deployed last year in Niger.

Dr. Susan Shepherd, MSF child nutrition advisor.
Mortality rates were observed to be 50 percent lower among a large group of young children in the west African nation of Niger in 2010, after they received a highly nutritious supplemental food.

Full Press Release.

Providing young children with high quality nutritious foods has long been one of the foundational principles of successful malnutrition and child mortality reduction programs in Europe, Latin America and the United States.

Dr. Susan Shepherd, MSF child nutrition advisor, outlines the inherent double standard.

Read the full press release on the impact of highly nutritious supplemental food here.

If donors and policymakers are serious about reducing child mortality rates, then providing child-appropriate foods must be made a standard component of any pediatric program in the world’s ‘malnutrition hotspots’.

Dr. Isabelle Defourny, MSF program manager for Niger.

Read the full press release on the impact of highly nutritious supplemental food here.