Posts tagged ngo

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF
The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF

The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

"I didn’t want to be another statistic of TB." Phumeza endured incredibly arduous treatment for her extensively drug-resistant TB. Now she is asking for better care for all TB patients. Sign the TB Manifesto:http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/Photo by Sydelle Willow Smith

"I didn’t want to be another statistic of TB." Phumeza endured incredibly arduous treatment for her extensively drug-resistant TB. Now she is asking for better care for all TB patients. Sign the TB Manifesto:http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/
Photo by Sydelle Willow Smith

With new, better drugs for his multidrug-resistant TB, Vardan is now able to be with his family instead of in and out of the hospital. “I am young. I am 60 years old. I am still useful to my community.” http://bit.ly/1if7CYg

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi
“Our teams have witnessed the consequences of extreme violence, including bullet wounds, maiming from attacks, and lynchings, which are daily realities in Bangui.” Read an update of MSF’s activities in Central African Republic:http://bit.ly/1ebCM36

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi

“Our teams have witnessed the consequences of extreme violence, including bullet wounds, maiming from attacks, and lynchings, which are daily realities in Bangui.” Read an update of MSF’s activities in Central African Republic:http://bit.ly/1ebCM36

Photo by Caroline Van Nespen/MSF 
“The area is about 95 percent destroyed,” says Dr. Von Schreeb. “It reminds me very much of Haiti, where I worked after the earthquake, and also Aceh [in Indonesia, where MSF responded to a tsunami in 2010]. But there was no tsunami wave here; the wind was just so strong that it flattened everything.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1igeMfg

Photo by Caroline Van Nespen/MSF

“The area is about 95 percent destroyed,” says Dr. Von Schreeb. “It reminds me very much of Haiti, where I worked after the earthquake, and also Aceh [in Indonesia, where MSF responded to a tsunami in 2010]. But there was no tsunami wave here; the wind was just so strong that it flattened everything.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1igeMfg

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF 
A journal from the Philippines: “People are sharing the little they still have. The kids play everywhere, with anything. I am always astonished to see how kids manage to stay kids in such apocalyptic situations.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1bsSLmN

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

A journal from the Philippines: “People are sharing the little they still have. The kids play everywhere, with anything. I am always astonished to see how kids manage to stay kids in such apocalyptic situations.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1bsSLmN

Go to http://bit.ly/18mbxOU and sign up for our monthly e-newsletter! Photo by Peter Casaer

Go to http://bit.ly/18mbxOU and sign up for our monthly e-newsletter! Photo by Peter Casaer

MSF’s outgoing international president, Dr. Unni Karunakara, left Sunday on a journey by bicycle from one end of India to the other. It’s a 3,000+ mile (5000 km) journey that Unni will use to spark a dialogue on health, healthcare, and humanitarianism. You can follow his progress here: https://www.cycleformsf.in/unnicycles/

MSF’s outgoing international president, Dr. Unni Karunakara, left Sunday on a journey by bicycle from one end of India to the other. It’s a 3,000+ mile (5000 km) journey that Unni will use to spark a dialogue on health, healthcare, and humanitarianism. You can follow his progress here: https://www.cycleformsf.in/unnicycles/

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII PhotoAn MSF nurse treats a patient at MSF’s free cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince on Wednesday. The cholera outbreak that began in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake continues to devastate people’s lives. Funding for treatment of the disease has fallen sharply in the last year, leaving people without care or making them pay for it. MSF treated 23,000 people for cholera in 2012.

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII Photo
An MSF nurse treats a patient at MSF’s free cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince on Wednesday. The cholera outbreak that began in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake continues to devastate people’s lives. Funding for treatment of the disease has fallen sharply in the last year, leaving people without care or making them pay for it. MSF treated 23,000 people for cholera in 2012.

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII PhotoAt MSF’s cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince, the head doctor, who comes from Ghana, treated this emergency patient on Wednesday. People continue to deal with this deadly disease that first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. The photographer said: “It’s inspiring, though, knowing that every single person in the hospitalization ward will survive because they’re receiving medical attention. It’s been some time since I’ve worked with MSF, and I forgot how much I respect the organization and how moved I am by their work.”

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII Photo
At MSF’s cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince, the head doctor, who comes from Ghana, treated this emergency patient on Wednesday. People continue to deal with this deadly disease that first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. The photographer said: “It’s inspiring, though, knowing that every single person in the hospitalization ward will survive because they’re receiving medical attention. It’s been some time since I’ve worked with MSF, and I forgot how much I respect the organization and how moved I am by their work.”

Photo by Marcus BleasdaleSeven-year-old Imani is treated for cholera in Masisi hospital, supported by MSF in Democratic Republic of Congo. The cholera epidemic started last year in the city of Rubaya and has largely affected mine workers and displaced people who are living without access to clean water and soap. MSF had treated 2,400 people with cholera at the hospital as of June.

Photo by Marcus Bleasdale
Seven-year-old Imani is treated for cholera in Masisi hospital, supported by MSF in Democratic Republic of Congo. The cholera epidemic started last year in the city of Rubaya and has largely affected mine workers and displaced people who are living without access to clean water and soap. MSF had treated 2,400 people with cholera at the hospital as of June.

Photo by Marcus Bleasdale18-month-old Asifiwe and her mother have been fleeing violence in Kibabi, Democratic Republic of Congo, for weeks, and the child has become severely malnourished. She was able to receive urgently needed nutrition treatment at an MSF mobile clinic. Medical teams go to Kibabi every week or two when security allows.

Photo by Marcus Bleasdale
18-month-old Asifiwe and her mother have been fleeing violence in Kibabi, Democratic Republic of Congo, for weeks, and the child has become severely malnourished. She was able to receive urgently needed nutrition treatment at an MSF mobile clinic. Medical teams go to Kibabi every week or two when security allows.

See the new documentary ‘Fire in the Blood’ at IFC Center in New York City through Thursday. An intricate tale of “medicine, monopoly, and malice,” it tells the story of how Western pharmaceutical companies and governments aggressively blocked access to affordable AIDS drugs in Africa and the global south, leading to ten million or more unnecessary deaths. It is also the inspiring story of the improbable group of people who decided to fight back. Get details

See the new documentary ‘Fire in the Blood’ at IFC Center in New York City through Thursday. An intricate tale of “medicine, monopoly, and malice,” it tells the story of how Western pharmaceutical companies and governments aggressively blocked access to affordable AIDS drugs in Africa and the global south, leading to ten million or more unnecessary deaths. It is also the inspiring story of the improbable group of people who decided to fight back. Get details

Photo by Sydelle WIllow Smith
With one brave last gulp Phumeza, 23, swallowed the last of the 20,000 pills she had taken to cure her extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB). Read the story/watch the video

Photo by Sydelle WIllow Smith

With one brave last gulp Phumeza, 23, swallowed the last of the 20,000 pills she had taken to cure her extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB). Read the story/watch the video

The U.S. and 11 other countries are negotiating the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement (TPP) in secret. Provisions of the deal could keep affordable lifesaving medicines out of the hands of people in developing countries. We want negotiation texts made public. 

The U.S. and 11 other countries are negotiating the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement (TPP) in secret. Provisions of the deal could keep affordable lifesaving medicines out of the hands of people in developing countries. We want negotiation texts made public.