Posts tagged myanmar

People living with HIV often face stigma and discrimination. Ko Tin Than lost everything when people found out he was HIV-positive. It even led to him stopping his treatment for a while. 

The fight against HIV/AIDS has been hailed as one of the most successful public health projects in human history, but MSF medical teams see the revolution as unfulfilled for millions of people excluded from treatment. Go to See.MSF.org to learn more.

We are very worried about our women; we have more than 200 pregnant women in our camp. For their delivery they cannot go to a health center and they will have to deliver here … in the mud without a doctor.

Man living in a displaced persons camp in Pauktaw Township, Rakhine State.

The Ongoing Humanitarian Emergency in Myanmar’s Rakhine State

Eight months since deadly communal clashes first broke out in Myanmar’s Rakhine State, tens of thousands of people are still unable to access urgently needed medical care. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) calls on government authorities and community leaders to ensure that all people of Rakhine can live without fear of violence, abuse, and harassment, and that humanitarian organizations can assist those most in need.

Photo: Displaced people bathe at a water pump in a camp outside Sittwe in Rakhine state. Myanmar 2013 © Kaung Htet
Myanmar: Violence and Intimidation Leave Tens of Thousands Without Medical Care
Eight months after deadly communal clashes broke out in Myanmar’s Rakhine state, tens of thousands of people are still unable to access urgently needed medical care.
MSF calls on government authorities and community leaders to ensure that all people of Rakhine can live without fear of violence, abuse and harassment, and that humanitarian organizations can assist those most in need.
“It is among people living in makeshift camps in rice fields or other crowded strips of land that MSF is seeing the most acute medical needs,” said Arjan Hehenkamp, MSF general director. “Ongoing insecurity and repeated threats and intimidation by a small but vocal group within the Rakhine community have severely impacted on our ability to deliver lifesaving medical care.”

Photo: Displaced people bathe at a water pump in a camp outside Sittwe in Rakhine state. Myanmar 2013 © Kaung Htet

Myanmar: Violence and Intimidation Leave Tens of Thousands Without Medical Care

Eight months after deadly communal clashes broke out in Myanmar’s Rakhine state, tens of thousands of people are still unable to access urgently needed medical care.

MSF calls on government authorities and community leaders to ensure that all people of Rakhine can live without fear of violence, abuse and harassment, and that humanitarian organizations can assist those most in need.

“It is among people living in makeshift camps in rice fields or other crowded strips of land that MSF is seeing the most acute medical needs,” said Arjan Hehenkamp, MSF general director. “Ongoing insecurity and repeated threats and intimidation by a small but vocal group within the Rakhine community have severely impacted on our ability to deliver lifesaving medical care.”

That we are prevented from acting and threatened for wanting to deliver medical aid to those in need is shocking and leaves tens of thousands without the medical care they urgently need.

Joe Belliveau, MSF operations manager, on the violence and threats that block access to medical care in Myanmar.

MSF assists people affected by violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine State, but are unable to provide care to many people in need due to ongoing ethnic tensions and threats against MSF staff.

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar. 


Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

“Lives in the Balance,” a report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.
Infographic by Will Owen

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar.

Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

Lives in the Balance,” a report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.

Infographic by Will Owen

MSF is extremely worried that victims of the clashes are not receiving emergency care, and about the ongoing healthcare needs of our patients. Our immediate concerns are to provide emergency medical services, get food and supplies to people, and ensure our HIV patients continue receiving their lifesaving treatment.
Joe Belliveau, MSF operations manager speaking about the continuing violence and deep communal divisions in Rakhine State, Myanmar, that is preventing people from receiving emergency medical treatment, the international medical humanitarian organization MSF said today.
The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar. 


Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

“Lives in the Balance,” a new report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.
Infographic by Will Owen

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar.

Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

Lives in the Balance,” a new report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.

Infographic by Will Owen

The math is simple. Rapidly scaling up HIV and TB treatment now will prevent further transmission and save both lives and money. Fewer people infected means fewer lives lost, and fewer people in need of treatment. It is critical that donors help Myanmar ensure that more patients across the country receive treatment for HIV and MDR-TB.
Peter Paul de Groote,
MSF head of mission in Myanmar

Speaking on the dire effects of the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.
"While international attention focuses on Myanmar, a health crisis in the country looms large. An estimated 85,000 people infected with HIV in Myanmar are not receiving lifesaving treatment.

This is an improvement on previous years with new momentum in the country to tackle the crisis. However, the recent retreat of the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria threatens to undo improvements, leaving tens of thousands of people living with HIV and TB without treatment and a large scale crisis unchecked.” 

—Joe Belliveau, MSF operations manager in Myanmar

This article originally appeared in Thailand’s The Nation newspaper.

Meeting with patients at an MSF clinic in southern Myanmar.

Photo: Myanmar 2011 © Veronique Terrasse/MSF

"While international attention focuses on Myanmar, a health crisis in the country looms large. An estimated 85,000 people infected with HIV in Myanmar are not receiving lifesaving treatment.

This is an improvement on previous years with new momentum in the country to tackle the crisis. However, the recent retreat of the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria threatens to undo improvements, leaving tens of thousands of people living with HIV and TB without treatment and a large scale crisis unchecked.”

—Joe Belliveau, MSF operations manager in Myanmar

This article originally appeared in Thailand’s The Nation newspaper.

Meeting with patients at an MSF clinic in southern Myanmar.

Photo: Myanmar 2011 © Veronique Terrasse/MSF

Yet again, donors have turned their backs on people living with HIV and TB in Myanmar. Every day we are confronted with the tragic consequences of these decisions: desperately sick people and unnecessary deaths.
Peter Paul de Groote,
MSF head of mission in Myanmar
Speaking on the tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar who are unable to access lifesaving treatment, a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.
Myanmar: Urgent Action Needed Against HIV and TB

Between 15,000 and 20,000 people living with HIV die every year in Myanmar because of lack of access to lifesaving ART. TB prevalence in Myanmar is more than three times the global average and Myanmar is among the 27 countries with the highest MDR-TB rates in the world. Like non-resistant TB, MDR-TB is easily transmitted through the air and can infect perfectly healthy people, but requires far more complex and lengthy treatment.

MSF currently treats more than 23,000 HIV patients in Myanmar. An additional 6,000 people will be enrolled in MSF clinics in 2012. Worlwide, MSF treats more than 170,000 people living with HIV. Photo: Myanmar 2012 © Greg Constantine. 
A young man co-infected with HIV and TB at MSF’s clinic in Yangon.

Myanmar: Urgent Action Needed Against HIV and TB

Between 15,000 and 20,000 people living with HIV die every year in Myanmar because of lack of access to lifesaving ART. TB prevalence in Myanmar is more than three times the global average and Myanmar is among the 27 countries with the highest MDR-TB rates in the world. Like non-resistant TB, MDR-TB is easily transmitted through the air and can infect perfectly healthy people, but requires far more complex and lengthy treatment.

MSF currently treats more than 23,000 HIV patients in Myanmar. An additional 6,000 people will be enrolled in MSF clinics in 2012. Worlwide, MSF treats more than 170,000 people living with HIV.

Photo: Myanmar 2012 © Greg Constantine. A young man co-infected with HIV and TB at MSF’s clinic in Yangon.

Dawn is just breaking when Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) counselor Aung Hein Maw begins another day of traveling through the Dawei and Myeik districts in southern Myanmar. In the early morning mist, one can just make out the silhouettes of palm trees and women working in the paddy fields. As the driver steers around the potholes, Maw checks his list of patients to visit. Most of them are “defaulters,” or patients who were diagnosed with HIV or TB-HIV co-infection at the clinic but who either failed to come back for their appointment or who have had problems adhering to the treatment. 

This is troubling for many reasons. For people living with HIV, TB is the most common opportunistic infection, and the main cause of death. When patients first start on a TB treatment regimen, they should come at least once a month to the clinic so that staff can monitor their progress. However, they don’t always come.

Photo: Myanmar 2011 © Veronique Terrasse/MSF

Dawn is just breaking when Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) counselor Aung Hein Maw begins another day of traveling through the Dawei and Myeik districts in southern Myanmar. In the early morning mist, one can just make out the silhouettes of palm trees and women working in the paddy fields. As the driver steers around the potholes, Maw checks his list of patients to visit. Most of them are “defaulters,” or patients who were diagnosed with HIV or TB-HIV co-infection at the clinic but who either failed to come back for their appointment or who have had problems adhering to the treatment.

This is troubling for many reasons. For people living with HIV, TB is the most common opportunistic infection, and the main cause of death. When patients first start on a TB treatment regimen, they should come at least once a month to the clinic so that staff can monitor their progress. However, they don’t always come.

Photo: Myanmar 2011 © Veronique Terrasse/MSF

It’s very gratifying to see how grateful the patients are for the care and attention we give them. Our input isn’t only medical; it also consists of moral support, as many of the patients are having a hard time and have lost their hope in life. Seeing them regain their confidence and strength is really rewarding.
Dr. Calorine Mekiedje on her experience as a medical adviser at the Dawei clinic in the south of Myanmar, where MSF has been treating HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) since 2000.
We go and find them in their villages and offer extra support for them to come back for their appointment, then we follow up and ensure they are taking their drugs correctly, but we also visit patients when they are at a critical point of their treatment or are experiencing side effects and need more support.
MSF counselor Aung Hein Maw, who travels through southern Myanmar to visit patients who were diagnosed with HIV or TB-HIV co-infection at the clinic but who either failed to come back for their appointment or who have had problems adhering to the treatment. Learn more.
Meeting with patients at an MSF clinic in southern Myanmar.

In this article, Dr. Calorine Mekiedje talks about her experience as a medical adviser at the Dawei clinic in the south of Myanmar, where MSF has been treating HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) since 2000.

Photo: Myanmar 2011 © Veronique Terrasse/MSF

Meeting with patients at an MSF clinic in southern Myanmar.

In this article, Dr. Calorine Mekiedje talks about her experience as a medical adviser at the Dawei clinic in the south of Myanmar, where MSF has been treating HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) since 2000.

Photo: Myanmar 2011 © Veronique Terrasse/MSF