Posts tagged morocco

MOROCCO: Trapped at the Gates of Europe
A report released today by MSF, Trapped at the Gates of Europe, documents the violence migrants are subjected to on a daily basis. Since December 2011, MSF teams have witnessed an increase in the number of police raids, during which migrants are beaten and their belongings destroyed. An increasing number of people are also being expelled to Algeria, including pregnant women, injured people, and minors.

MOROCCO: Trapped at the Gates of Europe

A report released today by MSF, Trapped at the Gates of Europe, documents the violence migrants are subjected to on a daily basis. Since December 2011, MSF teams have witnessed an increase in the number of police raids, during which migrants are beaten and their belongings destroyed. An increasing number of people are also being expelled to Algeria, including pregnant women, injured people, and minors.

Photo: The number of people seen with injuries caused by the security forces, falling from the fence, or fleeing from the police has increased. Morocco 2012 © Anna Surinyach
Morocco: Sharp Increase in Violence Against Migrants
Migrants from sub-Saharan Africa are suffering a sharp increase in violence at the hands of security forces in Morocco and at border areas, resulting in serious health problems.
“Since April last year we have seen people with broken arms, legs, hands, and jaws as well as broken teeth and concussions, amongst other injuries,” said David Cantero, MSF head of mission in Morocco. “The injuries documented by MSF are consistent with migrant accounts of attacks by security forces.”

Photo: The number of people seen with injuries caused by the security forces, falling from the fence, or fleeing from the police has increased. Morocco 2012 © Anna Surinyach

Morocco: Sharp Increase in Violence Against Migrants

Migrants from sub-Saharan Africa are suffering a sharp increase in violence at the hands of security forces in Morocco and at border areas, resulting in serious health problems.

“Since April last year we have seen people with broken arms, legs, hands, and jaws as well as broken teeth and concussions, amongst other injuries,” said David Cantero, MSF head of mission in Morocco. “The injuries documented by MSF are consistent with migrant accounts of attacks by security forces.”

Photo:Migrants in the Gourougou are mostly young men from West Africa who say they had to leave home due to poverty and no hopes of finding a job. In Europe, they say, they have dreams of getting education and earning money to send home to their families. Morocco 2012 © Anna Surinyach
Migrants in Morocco: “We Live Like Prehistoric Men”
In northwestern Morocco, in the forests of Gourougou Mountain, several hundred African migrants are living covertly in remote makeshift camps, struggling to survive, and waiting for an opportunity to enter Europe.
They are mostly young men from West African countries who have left their homes because they had no way to make money and who have left behind family members who are reliant on them, in the hopes of sending back support.
Having gained the trust of these migrants, who hide because they are frequently targeted by the authorities, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) conducts monthly mobile medical clinics to their camps, providing primary health care, distributions, and psychological support.

Photo:Migrants in the Gourougou are mostly young men from West Africa who say they had to leave home due to poverty and no hopes of finding a job. In Europe, they say, they have dreams of getting education and earning money to send home to their families. Morocco 2012 © Anna Surinyach

Migrants in Morocco: “We Live Like Prehistoric Men”

In northwestern Morocco, in the forests of Gourougou Mountain, several hundred African migrants are living covertly in remote makeshift camps, struggling to survive, and waiting for an opportunity to enter Europe.

They are mostly young men from West African countries who have left their homes because they had no way to make money and who have left behind family members who are reliant on them, in the hopes of sending back support.

Having gained the trust of these migrants, who hide because they are frequently targeted by the authorities, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) conducts monthly mobile medical clinics to their camps, providing primary health care, distributions, and psychological support.

Photo: Mussa, a migrant from Mali who desperately wants to get to Europe, returns to his camp in the northwest of Morocco after his second failed attempt to cross into Spanish territory. Morocco 2012 © Anna Surinyach
Migrants In Morocco Stuck At A Dead End
They arrive breathless and defeated, drenched by sweat intermingled with the rain and covered with mud. They have run up Gourougou Mountain and some now limp. It was another unsuccessful attempt to get over the fence separating them from Melilla, an autonomous Spanish city on the northwestern coast of Morocco. Now it’s back to the small clutch of trees which serves as “home” for the time being.
In the nieghboring Moroccan city of Nador, in the pretty pine-covered hills and lowland forest of Gourougou, some several hundred African migrants are living in makeshift camps, awaiting the opportunity to enter Europe.
Stuck in the Alawite country, unable to move or return to their own countries, and unable to work in Morocco, they suffer constant harassment, even violence, from the Moroccan security forces trying to prevent them from jumping the fence into Spanish territory and making their way across the Straight of Gibraltar to Europe. Spain’s Guardia Civil is also involved in the harassment and expels migrants to the border with Algeria.
Morocco has become a dead end for these migrants, African men and women who look to Europe because it has to be better than what they have left behind. And better than what they are living through right now. But they do not give up.
“We’d been waiting all night in the rain, next to the fence, waiting for the chance,” said one migrant named Mussa, shivering in the November cold. “But it wasn’t until the morning that it came. It wasn’t possible, no one got over. There were more than a hundred of us. The soldiers got me on the head with a stone. About 20 got their feet caught in the barbed wire on the fence. We had to leave them there, they were getting hit.”

Photo: Mussa, a migrant from Mali who desperately wants to get to Europe, returns to his camp in the northwest of Morocco after his second failed attempt to cross into Spanish territory. Morocco 2012 © Anna Surinyach

Migrants In Morocco Stuck At A Dead End

They arrive breathless and defeated, drenched by sweat intermingled with the rain and covered with mud. They have run up Gourougou Mountain and some now limp. It was another unsuccessful attempt to get over the fence separating them from Melilla, an autonomous Spanish city on the northwestern coast of Morocco. Now it’s back to the small clutch of trees which serves as “home” for the time being.

In the nieghboring Moroccan city of Nador, in the pretty pine-covered hills and lowland forest of Gourougou, some several hundred African migrants are living in makeshift camps, awaiting the opportunity to enter Europe.

Stuck in the Alawite country, unable to move or return to their own countries, and unable to work in Morocco, they suffer constant harassment, even violence, from the Moroccan security forces trying to prevent them from jumping the fence into Spanish territory and making their way across the Straight of Gibraltar to Europe. Spain’s Guardia Civil is also involved in the harassment and expels migrants to the border with Algeria.

Morocco has become a dead end for these migrants, African men and women who look to Europe because it has to be better than what they have left behind. And better than what they are living through right now. But they do not give up.

“We’d been waiting all night in the rain, next to the fence, waiting for the chance,” said one migrant named Mussa, shivering in the November cold. “But it wasn’t until the morning that it came. It wasn’t possible, no one got over. There were more than a hundred of us. The soldiers got me on the head with a stone. About 20 got their feet caught in the barbed wire on the fence. We had to leave them there, they were getting hit.”

We provided medical support to a woman who had given birth to her child just six days before. She was arrested by the police forces and spent five days in a police cell with her newborn child. Then she was taken back to the border.

Jorge Martin, MSF’s head of mission in Morocco

Full Article.

Morocco: Expelled Migrants Left in Precarious State

Hundreds of migrants, including women and children, have been deported to a no-man’s land at the border between Morocco and Algeria, abandoned there during the night without food and water.

MSF Postcards Series: Migrants write home from Malta and Morocco

Two new stories of people who left their home countries in search of safety, peace, and decent living conditions from our “Postcards from Migrants in Malta and Morocco” series.

Postcards from Migrants in Malta and Morocco

Through “Postcards from Migrants in Malta and Morocco”, we are sharing the stories of men and women who left their home countries in search of safety, peace, and decent living conditions. Check it out!