Posts tagged middle east

From the series MSF in 2013:
“At one point, we operated for 40 hours with only one two-hour break. Then we slept for three hours, and operated for another 12 hours after that.”—Dr. John de Csepel, Doctors Without Borders trauma surgeon in SyriaAn MSF surgeon operates on a patient in an inflatable operating theatre set up inside a converted chicken farm in Syria. Photo © Robin Meldrum/MSF

From the series MSF in 2013:

“At one point, we operated for 40 hours with only one two-hour break. Then we slept for three hours, and operated for another 12 hours after that.”
—Dr. John de Csepel, Doctors Without Borders trauma surgeon in Syria
An MSF surgeon operates on a patient in an inflatable operating theatre set up inside a converted chicken farm in Syria. Photo © Robin Meldrum/MSF

From the series MSF in 2013:
“While we are treating an increasing number of patients … many more people cannot even make it to the hospitals … That’s why we want to go beyond our hospital walls and reach out to some of these isolated communities.”—Benoit De Gryse, Doctors Without Borders country representative in AfghanistanA three-year-old boy and his two-year-old sister injured in a bomb explosion were treated in MSF’s emergency room at Boost Hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Photo © Francois Dumont

From the series MSF in 2013:

“While we are treating an increasing number of patients … many more people cannot even make it to the hospitals … That’s why we want to go beyond our hospital walls and reach out to some of these isolated communities.”
—Benoit De Gryse, Doctors Without Borders country representative in Afghanistan
A three-year-old boy and his two-year-old sister injured in a bomb explosion were treated in MSF’s emergency room at Boost Hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Photo © Francois Dumont

Go to http://bit.ly/18mbxOU and sign up for our monthly e-newsletter! Photo by Peter Casaer

Go to http://bit.ly/18mbxOU and sign up for our monthly e-newsletter! Photo by Peter Casaer

Photo by Pierre-Yves Bernard/MSF
Mental health needs among Syrian refugees are steadily increasing. In Domeez camp, Iraq, “disorders such as schizophrenia and severe depression are becoming more commonplace, and we are seeing many patients who have suicidal tendencies.” MSF psychologists and counselors have worked here along with medical staff for over a year now. Read more: http://bit.ly/1bcvJm3

Photo by Pierre-Yves Bernard/MSF

Mental health needs among Syrian refugees are steadily increasing. In Domeez camp, Iraq, “disorders such as schizophrenia and severe depression are becoming more commonplace, and we are seeing many patients who have suicidal tendencies.” MSF psychologists and counselors have worked here along with medical staff for over a year now. Read more: http://bit.ly/1bcvJm3

"Most diplomatic discussion on Syria has focused on the recent chemical weapons attack … Meanwhile, the residents of this area continue to face daily bombings and a blockade that deprives them of the food and medicines that they need to survive. And humanitarian assistance is not even on the agenda of international negotiations." - MSF op-ed, published Sept. 17 http://bit.ly/19hy5yo

"Most diplomatic discussion on Syria has focused on the recent chemical weapons attack … Meanwhile, the residents of this area continue to face daily bombings and a blockade that deprives them of the food and medicines that they need to survive. And humanitarian assistance is not even on the agenda of international negotiations." - MSF op-ed, published Sept. 17 http://bit.ly/19hy5yo

An MSF nurse tries to make a young patient smile in the ER of one of MSF’s makeshift hospitals in Syria. “We work as a beehive,” said one of the Syrian nurses. “Not only war-related cases are admitted, the hospital also receives normal medical cases, such as flu or medical emergencies, pediatrics—everything, even blood transfers. It’s similar to any regular hospital.” Before the current war, Syrians used to have access to good quality health care; now MSF is trying to help fill the enormous gaps.
Photo by Robin Meldrum/MSF

An MSF nurse tries to make a young patient smile in the ER of one of MSF’s makeshift hospitals in Syria. “We work as a beehive,” said one of the Syrian nurses. “Not only war-related cases are admitted, the hospital also receives normal medical cases, such as flu or medical emergencies, pediatrics—everything, even blood transfers. It’s similar to any regular hospital.” Before the current war, Syrians used to have access to good quality health care; now MSF is trying to help fill the enormous gaps.

Photo by Robin Meldrum/MSF

An MSF nurse performs an ante-natal consultation for a pregnant woman in one of MSF’s makeshift hospitals in Syria. “Before this war people in Syria had good quality health care,” said MSF surgeon Steve Rubin. “Many Syrians really want that care again. But in this area, other than us, all the other medical facilities are doing war trauma. So they come here because this is their only option.”
Photo by Cathy Janssens/MSF

An MSF nurse performs an ante-natal consultation for a pregnant woman in one of MSF’s makeshift hospitals in Syria. “Before this war people in Syria had good quality health care,” said MSF surgeon Steve Rubin. “Many Syrians really want that care again. But in this area, other than us, all the other medical facilities are doing war trauma. So they come here because this is their only option.”

Photo by Cathy Janssens/MSF

Photo by Marjie Middleton/MSF
"We’ve heard stories of women left to deliver on their own in a tent. Such stories are very upsetting to me as a midwife, because I know how dangerous it is and how awful it must be for a mother to give birth scared and alone.” - MSF midwife in Lebanon working with pregnant Syrian refugees  Read the story 

Photo by Marjie Middleton/MSF

"We’ve heard stories of women left to deliver on their own in a tent. Such stories are very upsetting to me as a midwife, because I know how dangerous it is and how awful it must be for a mother to give birth scared and alone.” - MSF midwife in Lebanon working with pregnant Syrian refugees  Read the story 

Fasting in solidarity: an MSF psychologist working with child TB patients in Tajikistan describes her first Ramadan fast. Read more
Photo by Terry Porsild/MSF

Fasting in solidarity: an MSF psychologist working with child TB patients in Tajikistan describes her first Ramadan fast. Read more

Photo by Terry Porsild/MSF

U.S. surgeon Steve Rubin is working in an inflatable operating theatre in northern Syria, where the health care system has been destroyed by war. See a video about treating patients in Syria here.

U.S. surgeon Steve Rubin is working in an inflatable operating theatre in northern Syria, where the health care system has been destroyed by war. See a video about treating patients in Syria here.

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi
In a country where people are already struggling, refugees and migrants have become “invisible” to much of Greek society. Thousands have been arrested and imprisoned in detention centers where they live in appalling conditions with little or no access to medical care. Most of the migrants who come through northern Greece’s Evros region are from Afghanistan, like these children, while others come from Pakistan, Syria, Bangladesh and Somalia. A Doctors Without Borders emergency team has been working at three border police stations where migrants are received and at the Filakio detention center, where many are detained. Read more: http://bit.ly/19InPQT

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi

In a country where people are already struggling, refugees and migrants have become “invisible” to much of Greek society. Thousands have been arrested and imprisoned in detention centers where they live in appalling conditions with little or no access to medical care. Most of the migrants who come through northern Greece’s Evros region are from Afghanistan, like these children, while others come from Pakistan, Syria, Bangladesh and Somalia. A Doctors Without Borders emergency team has been working at three border police stations where migrants are received and at the Filakio detention center, where many are detained. Read more: http://bit.ly/19InPQT

Photo © Stefan Kruger
An injured child needs specialized neurosurgical care in #Afghanistan and the hospital is more than 200 miles away over bad roads and insecure areas. What do you do? http://bit.ly/14vssdE

Photo © Stefan Kruger

An injured child needs specialized neurosurgical care in #Afghanistan and the hospital is more than 200 miles away over bad roads and insecure areas. What do you do? http://bit.ly/14vssdE

Iran: Helping Women Survive in One of Tehran’s Toughest Neighborhoods
Photo by Mohsen Sheikholesl
Doctors Without Borders has been providing medical assistance to drug addicts, prostitutes and street children in Tehran’s Darvazeh Ghar neighborhood. See more photos: http://bit.ly/130aNPH

Iran: Helping Women Survive in One of Tehran’s Toughest Neighborhoods

Photo by Mohsen Sheikholesl

Doctors Without Borders has been providing medical assistance to drug addicts, prostitutes and street children in Tehran’s Darvazeh Ghar neighborhood. See more photos: http://bit.ly/130aNPH

Photo by Anna Surinyach
"I have worked in some pretty ugly spots, but coming away from Syria I was really disturbed… by what seemed to be almost a mass psychosis in the population. You could read it in their faces, manifest in some as profound sadness and in others as intense rage and anger." - MSF’s Dr. Greg Elder in the New Zealand Herald
Read more: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10891396

Photo by Anna Surinyach

"I have worked in some pretty ugly spots, but coming away from Syria I was really disturbed… by what seemed to be almost a mass psychosis in the population. You could read it in their faces, manifest in some as profound sadness and in others as intense rage and anger." - MSF’s Dr. Greg Elder in the New Zealand Herald

Read more: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10891396

Photo by Peter Casaer
"Today I saw the worst case of breast cancer I have ever seen"
"Sometimes, the seeming futility of this job overwhelms me. We see so many diseases – both chronic and acute – that we are unable to do anything about. When I considered coming to Afghanistan, I felt I was prepared to see malnutrition, wounded patients, trauma, etc. I did not realize the amount of chronic diseases and other conditions that we would be helpless to treat. At home, this woman would have had a mammogram and ultrasound when she first noticed a lump in her breast. She would have received free health care that would have, in all likelihood, saved her life. We have no chemotherapy, radiation therapy, mammography, or indeed oncologists here in Helmand [Afghanistan]."
Read more at http://blogs.msf.org/afghanistan/2013/06/what-if/

Photo by Peter Casaer

"Today I saw the worst case of breast cancer I have ever seen"

"Sometimes, the seeming futility of this job overwhelms me. We see so many diseases – both chronic and acute – that we are unable to do anything about. When I considered coming to Afghanistan, I felt I was prepared to see malnutrition, wounded patients, trauma, etc. I did not realize the amount of chronic diseases and other conditions that we would be helpless to treat. At home, this woman would have had a mammogram and ultrasound when she first noticed a lump in her breast. She would have received free health care that would have, in all likelihood, saved her life. We have no chemotherapy, radiation therapy, mammography, or indeed oncologists here in Helmand [Afghanistan]."

Read more at http://blogs.msf.org/afghanistan/2013/06/what-if/