Posts tagged medical aid

432,000 routine vaccinations, 78,500 surgeries, 1,642,800 malaria cases treated! Take a look at Doctors Without Borders in 2012 by the numbers.

432,000 routine vaccinations, 78,500 surgeries, 1,642,800 malaria cases treated! Take a look at Doctors Without Borders in 2012 by the numbers.

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Mali: MSF Maintains its Presence in Timbuktu

Since mid-April, an MSF team has been working in Timbuktu’s hospital, providing medical care for people living in a region destabilized by the conflict that has enveloped the country’s north and displaced thousands in recent months.

For much of the time MSF has worked in the hospital, Timbuktu has been controlled by Tuareg rebels and armed Islamist groups, and much of the city’s population has fled either to other parts of Mali or neighboring countries. Tension has pervaded the city, nearby health centers have been pillaged, sporadic fighting has flared up among armed groups and, recently, sacred sites around the city have been destroyed.

“Bringing aid to this destabilized region is a challenge, but it’s also a necessity,” explains Dr. Mego Terzian, MSF Emergency Desk Manager. “The instability impedes the access of humanitarians, and the north of Mali remains blocked to westerners. Nonetheless, because the situation remains volatile and could deteriorate at any time, we are maintaining our presence in Timbuktu’s hospital and in the surrounding villages.”Photo: An MSF staff member distributes emergency supplies in Aglal, Timbuktu area.
Mali 2012 © Foura Sassou Madi/MSF

Mali: MSF Maintains its Presence in Timbuktu

Since mid-April, an MSF team has been working in Timbuktu’s hospital, providing medical care for people living in a region destabilized by the conflict that has enveloped the country’s north and displaced thousands in recent months.

For much of the time MSF has worked in the hospital, Timbuktu has been controlled by Tuareg rebels and armed Islamist groups, and much of the city’s population has fled either to other parts of Mali or neighboring countries. Tension has pervaded the city, nearby health centers have been pillaged, sporadic fighting has flared up among armed groups and, recently, sacred sites around the city have been destroyed.

Bringing aid to this destabilized region is a challenge, but it’s also a necessity,” explains Dr. Mego Terzian, MSF Emergency Desk Manager. “The instability impedes the access of humanitarians, and the north of Mali remains blocked to westerners. Nonetheless, because the situation remains volatile and could deteriorate at any time, we are maintaining our presence in Timbuktu’s hospital and in the surrounding villages.”

Photo: An MSF staff member distributes emergency supplies in Aglal, Timbuktu area.
Mali 2012 © Foura Sassou Madi/MSF

Meeting the Health Needs of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon
MSF Assists Syrians Fleeing ConflictMore than 20,700 Syrians who have fled their country are now officially registered in Lebanon, out of 27,000 reported by the UN Refugee Agency. Most of them are living in the north and the Bekaa valley. Some are staying with relatives or with the local community; others are living in public buildings or abandoned houses. Most have few possessions, and life is a daily struggle. Health services and local NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] are also coming under strain.

The Syrian crisis is having a growing impact in Lebanon, especially in the border regions and Tripoli. Since mid-April, we have expanded our mental health care services to Tripoli governmental hospital, located in one the most conflict-ridden areas, and an MSF emergency doctor is also helping in the hospital’s emergency department. MSF plans to reinforce its capacity to provide emergency medical care for civilians directly or indirectly affected by the violence by working in a hospital and two health centers.Photo: An MSF staff member attends to a Syrian family that fled across the border to Aarsal.

Lebanon 2012 © MSF

Meeting the Health Needs of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon
MSF Assists Syrians Fleeing Conflict


More than 20,700 Syrians who have fled their country are now officially registered in Lebanon, out of 27,000 reported by the UN Refugee Agency. Most of them are living in the north and the Bekaa valley. Some are staying with relatives or with the local community; others are living in public buildings or abandoned houses. Most have few possessions, and life is a daily struggle. Health services and local NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] are also coming under strain.

The Syrian crisis is having a growing impact in Lebanon, especially in the border regions and Tripoli. Since mid-April, we have expanded our mental health care services to Tripoli governmental hospital, located in one the most conflict-ridden areas, and an MSF emergency doctor is also helping in the hospital’s emergency department. MSF plans to reinforce its capacity to provide emergency medical care for civilians directly or indirectly affected by the violence by working in a hospital and two health centers.

Photo: An MSF staff member attends to a Syrian family that fled across the border to Aarsal.
Lebanon 2012 © MSF

Voice From the Field: “People Living in Dadaab are Broken”

“As more and more refugees crossed the border, and the security situation got worse, three sprawling refugee camps—named after the nearby town of Dadaab—were set up 80 kilometers [about 50 miles] away in the desert, with space for 90,000 people. Today, almost half a million Somalis are struggling to survive in the camps.”

Abubakar Mohamed Mahamud has worked with Somali refugees in northeastern Kenya since the war in Somalia began more than 20 years ago. Originally a nurse specializing in nutrition, he is now MSF’s deputy field coordinator.
Photo: Somali refugees wait outside the MSF health post on the outskirts of Dadaab’s Dagahaley camp.
 
Kenya 2011 © Lynsey Addario/VII

Voice From the Field: “People Living in Dadaab are Broken”

“As more and more refugees crossed the border, and the security situation got worse, three sprawling refugee camps—named after the nearby town of Dadaab—were set up 80 kilometers [about 50 miles] away in the desert, with space for 90,000 people. Today, almost half a million Somalis are struggling to survive in the camps.”

Abubakar Mohamed Mahamud has worked with Somali refugees in northeastern Kenya since the war in Somalia began more than 20 years ago. Originally a nurse specializing in nutrition, he is now MSF’s deputy field coordinator.

Photo: Somali refugees wait outside the MSF health post on the outskirts of Dadaab’s Dagahaley camp.

Kenya 2011 © Lynsey Addario/VII