Posts tagged map

Photo: Syria’s Idlib Governorate. 2012 © Google
MSF Treats 44 Wounded in Bomb and Rocket Attacks in Northwestern Syria
After aerial bombs and a rocket struck localities in the west of Syria’s Idlib governorate, 44 wounded patients received emergency treatment in a field hospital operated by the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) on January 15.
Thirty-six wounded patients arrived early in the afternoon, after several barrels of explosives were dropped on a village, with one landing close to a bakery. One patient died of her wounds while being evacuated to Turkey.“Most of the patients we received were men, women, and children wounded by debris or metal fragments from the explosions,” said Marie-Christine Férir, MSF emergency program manager and nurse, who was on site and helped treat the wounded. “There were also people with eye wounds and one with an open fracture, who went into surgery. A little girl who suffered a skull trauma died while being transferred to Turkey.”
Later on January 15, MSF’s field hospital received eight more patients injured by a rocket in another location, four of whom were dead on arrival.
The mountainous region of Jabal Al-Akrad, east of the city of Latakia, has been under almost daily bombings for months. While most residents have left the area, those who remain live in constant fear of the barrels of explosives that are dropped by Syrian Army helicopters.
“Apart from the people wounded in the conflict, we continue to see an increasing need for medical care,” Férir said. “We treat around 500 patients every week, including for respiratory diseases and chronic illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes. We are also assisting more women to give birth safely. The health system in Jabal Al-Akrad’s mountainous region collapsed around two years ago. Now the winter cold and snow are reaching the region and medical needs are growing.”
MSF is working in three hospitals in northern and northwestern Syria in areas controlled by armed opposition groups. On January 13, another MSF hospital treated 20 wounded patients, including five children, after a market was bombed in the town of Azaz, in Aleppo governorate.

Photo: Syria’s Idlib Governorate. 2012 © Google

MSF Treats 44 Wounded in Bomb and Rocket Attacks in Northwestern Syria

After aerial bombs and a rocket struck localities in the west of Syria’s Idlib governorate, 44 wounded patients received emergency treatment in a field hospital operated by the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) on January 15.

Thirty-six wounded patients arrived early in the afternoon, after several barrels of explosives were dropped on a village, with one landing close to a bakery. One patient died of her wounds while being evacuated to Turkey.

“Most of the patients we received were men, women, and children wounded by debris or metal fragments from the explosions,” said Marie-Christine Férir, MSF emergency program manager and nurse, who was on site and helped treat the wounded. “There were also people with eye wounds and one with an open fracture, who went into surgery. A little girl who suffered a skull trauma died while being transferred to Turkey.”

Later on January 15, MSF’s field hospital received eight more patients injured by a rocket in another location, four of whom were dead on arrival.

The mountainous region of Jabal Al-Akrad, east of the city of Latakia, has been under almost daily bombings for months. While most residents have left the area, those who remain live in constant fear of the barrels of explosives that are dropped by Syrian Army helicopters.

“Apart from the people wounded in the conflict, we continue to see an increasing need for medical care,” Férir said. “We treat around 500 patients every week, including for respiratory diseases and chronic illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes. We are also assisting more women to give birth safely. The health system in Jabal Al-Akrad’s mountainous region collapsed around two years ago. Now the winter cold and snow are reaching the region and medical needs are growing.”

MSF is working in three hospitals in northern and northwestern Syria in areas controlled by armed opposition groups. On January 13, another MSF hospital treated 20 wounded patients, including five children, after a market was bombed in the town of Azaz, in Aleppo governorate.

Walking For Days To Escape Violence: One Refugee’s Crossing Into South Sudan

Amal is 28 years old and a mother of three. She and around 35,000 other refugees escaped violence in Sudan’s Blue Nile State by crossing the border into South Sudan in May and June. On June 12, Amal was brought to a MSF mobile clinic at a refugee transit site called ‘Kilometer 18’ in Upper Nile State. She was thin, weak and coughing, and she could barely walk. Amal was immediately examined, an IV drip was inserted into her arm, and she was transferred to MSF’s hospital in the Jamam refugee camp. MSF health staff suspect that she has tuberculosis and will start her on TB treatment soon. Amal weighs just 32 kilograms, or 80 pounds, and she is too weak to speak, so her cousin Hassan told her story on her behalf.

Ivan Gayton on geeks and primitive fieldworkers: a tale of two cultures

As a project manager for MSF, a medical emergency humanitarian agency, I attended this year’s South by Southwest (SXSW) festival in Austin, Texas, in the company of a friend and collaborator from Google who is involved in crisis mapping. We gave a presentation on some mapping work we had done together, and inevitably we discussed the differences and similarities in our geek (high-technology) and primitive fieldworker (humanitarian) cultures.

At SXSW we had the chance to share that cultural crossover with a broad audience of geeks, fieldworkers, and an assortment of others, all of whom shared an interest in the intersection of humanitarian work and technology. My main take-home message was: we are not alone. We humanitarians tend to take pride in our ability to deal with problems by stretching our ingenuity and using only what is available in the field. My friend from Google was astounded at what we do with spreadsheets, saying “I didn’t think that this could be done without software coding capacity.” We use spreadsheets as databases, stock management systems, maps, payroll systems, and sketchpads.Humanitarians need tools and information, particularly during crises. The tech world is bursting with possibilities to provide just that, often free of charge and with an astonishing level of professionalism. I hope that this meeting of cultures continues to deepen and that the early promise of these innovations translates to real benefit to the populations in crisis that we serve.

Ivan Gayton on geeks and primitive fieldworkers: a tale of two cultures

As a project manager for MSF, a medical emergency humanitarian agency, I attended this year’s South by Southwest (SXSW) festival in Austin, Texas, in the company of a friend and collaborator from Google who is involved in crisis mapping. We gave a presentation on some mapping work we had done together, and inevitably we discussed the differences and similarities in our geek (high-technology) and primitive fieldworker (humanitarian) cultures.

At SXSW we had the chance to share that cultural crossover with a broad audience of geeks, fieldworkers, and an assortment of others, all of whom shared an interest in the intersection of humanitarian work and technology. My main take-home message was: we are not alone. We humanitarians tend to take pride in our ability to deal with problems by stretching our ingenuity and using only what is available in the field. My friend from Google was astounded at what we do with spreadsheets, saying “I didn’t think that this could be done without software coding capacity.” We use spreadsheets as databases, stock management systems, maps, payroll systems, and sketchpads.

Humanitarians need tools and information, particularly during crises. The tech world is bursting with possibilities to provide just that, often free of charge and with an astonishing level of professionalism. I hope that this meeting of cultures continues to deepen and that the early promise of these innovations translates to real benefit to the populations in crisis that we serve.