Posts tagged liberia

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.
Sia Bintou spent more than 10 days in MSF’s Ebola treatment center in Guéckédou, Guinea. There were many times when the medical team thought she would not make it, but Bintou beat the disease. Here, staff congratulate her as she is discharged. Right now, Ebola patients have been identified in more than 60 locations in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. MSF is the only aid organization treating people affected by the virus.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.

Sia Bintou spent more than 10 days in MSF’s Ebola treatment center in Guéckédou, Guinea. There were many times when the medical team thought she would not make it, but Bintou beat the disease. Here, staff congratulate her as she is discharged. Right now, Ebola patients have been identified in more than 60 locations in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. MSF is the only aid organization treating people affected by the virus.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.
Teams at the treatment center at Donka hospital, in Conakry, Guinea, work through the night and 24/7. Since the outbreak in West Africa began in March, MSF has treated 470 patients—215 of them confirmed cases—in specialized treatment centers in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. The scale of this Ebola epidemic is unprecedented in terms of geographical distribution and the numbers of cases and deaths. There have been 528 cases and 337 deaths since the epidemic began, according to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) figures.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.

Teams at the treatment center at Donka hospital, in Conakry, Guinea, work through the night and 24/7. Since the outbreak in West Africa began in March, MSF has treated 470 patients—215 of them confirmed cases—in specialized treatment centers in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. The scale of this Ebola epidemic is unprecedented in terms of geographical distribution and the numbers of cases and deaths. There have been 528 cases and 337 deaths since the epidemic began, according to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) figures.

I learned a lot about closing a project in Liberia. It’s always difficult, but it’s important to maintain the capability to be the first responders in conflict zones and not have our resources tied up providing primary care. You get attached to the staff , you get attached to the patients, but it’s important that MSF is able to maintain the capacity to do what we do.
Forced to leave her project in Liberia unexpectedly, MSF mental health officer Athena Viscusi reflects on what it’s like to close a MSF project.

Bringing Much-Needed Medical Care to Timbuktu, Mali

Liberian project coordinator Toe Jackson describes how his MSF team brought much-needed medical care to conflict-ridden Timbuktu, Mali.

Watch your step

Delivery of humanitarian aid around the world has become a moral, political and military minefield.

How do you broker deals with belligerents to reach vulnerable populations without selling your soul? When is a compromise to gain access to populations a betrayal of them? When to speak up, and when to say silent, on atrocities? When is doing nothing morally better than answering urgent human imperative to ”do something”?

The suicide attack last week was ”a really terrible event, and to understand it we have to first differentiate between aid and humanitarian aid - and I am not putting one above the other, morally speaking,” says Fabrice Weissman, a Frenchman who for years has been negotiating moral landmines as a veteran MSF logistician and head of mission.
His experiences in conflicts from Sudan to Sierra Leone, Ethiopia to Liberia, are drawn on in the book he has helped write and edit, Humanitarian Negotiations Revealed: The MSF Experience (Columbia University Press), but which is perhaps known more evocatively by its French title, Agir a tout Prix? (Acting At Any Price?).

—Jo Chandler
April 5, 2012
For Australia’s The Age

Read more.

Watch your step

Delivery of humanitarian aid around the world has become a moral, political and military minefield.

How do you broker deals with belligerents to reach vulnerable populations without selling your soul? When is a compromise to gain access to populations a betrayal of them? When to speak up, and when to say silent, on atrocities? When is doing nothing morally better than answering urgent human imperative to ”do something”?

The suicide attack last week was ”a really terrible event, and to understand it we have to first differentiate between aid and humanitarian aid - and I am not putting one above the other, morally speaking,” says Fabrice Weissman, a Frenchman who for years has been negotiating moral landmines as a veteran MSF logistician and head of mission.

His experiences in conflicts from Sudan to Sierra Leone, Ethiopia to Liberia, are drawn on in the book he has helped write and edit, Humanitarian Negotiations Revealed: The MSF Experience (Columbia University Press), but which is perhaps known more evocatively by its French title, Agir a tout Prix? (Acting At Any Price?).

—Jo Chandler
April 5, 2012
For Australia’s The Age Read more.

Men assist a girl disembarking at a transit camp in Liberia for people from the Ivory Coast who fled post-election violence in their homeland and sought sanctuary across the border, where MSF worked to provide medical care. See more of The Year in Pictures 2011.

Photo: Liberia © Gaël Turine

Men assist a girl disembarking at a transit camp in Liberia for people from the Ivory Coast who fled post-election violence in their homeland and sought sanctuary across the border, where MSF worked to provide medical care. See more of The Year in Pictures 2011.

Photo: Liberia © Gaël Turine

These people are still terrified, so they wait until their condition is critical to seek medical care. The displaced people are too afraid to return to their homes in case the violence is not yet over.
Xavier Simon, MSF head of mission in Ivory Coast where the medical and humanitarian emergency situation persists as violence rages in several neighborhoods in the city of Abidjan, and security in the west of the country remains critically unstable.
Earlier this week, renewed fighting around the town of Duékoué sent more than 60 wounded people to the MSF-supported hospital in Bangolo, about 30 kilometers (18 miles) north. The MSF local staff in Duékoué also received 138 patients. At least hundreds of people fled the town, and among them part of the medical staff. Their situation is very worrying—the population continues to suffer from the direct consequences of the violence.

Carole Coeur, who is currently working as an MSF field coordinator in the western reaches of Ivory Coast, near the border with Liberia, where MSF is running mobile clinics and supporting local hospitals amidst pervasive insecurity and violence.

Full Interview.

2003Heavy Fighting in the Liberian Capital

During fierce fighting between government and rebel troops in Monrovia, MSF assists thousands of displaced people and creates makeshift emergency hospitals at the MSF residences.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Liberia 2003 © Francois Dominguez

2003
Heavy Fighting in the Liberian Capital

During fierce fighting between government and rebel troops in Monrovia, MSF assists thousands of displaced people and creates makeshift emergency hospitals at the MSF residences.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Liberia 2003 © Francois Dominguez

In Liberia, starting on February 24, we have witnessed the arrival of a second wave of refugees. People are afraid and do not speak of returning. And they fear for those who have remained in Ivory Coast. It is important to continue to provide assistance wherever the refugees are found, and wherever the local population has been made vulnerable by this massive influx of people.
Helga Ritter, MSF coordinator in Liberia from a recent MSF press release, Ivory Coast: Marked Deterioration of Situation in the West.

1990
MSF-USA is Created
MSF opens an office in New York City, its first outside Europe. A year later, offices open in Canada and Italy as well, and the International Office is formed, based in Geneva.

Civil War in Liberia
MSF provides emergency care at the height of the fighting.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Patient arriving by ambulance at MSF hospital in Liberia as seen in the documentary Living in Emergency.

Encore Q&A sessions in New York and Boston Friday, June 11th and Saturday, June 12th!  Visit the Living in Emergency website for screening times and locations.


© Red Floor Pictures

Patient arriving by ambulance at MSF hospital in Liberia as seen in the documentary Living in Emergency.

Encore Q&A sessions in New York and Boston Friday, June 11th and Saturday, June 12th! Visit the Living in Emergency website for screening times and locations.


© Red Floor Pictures

Living in Emergency: NOW PLAYING! Visit the Living in Emergency site to find screenings in your area.

Synopsis: Filmed in the war-zones of Liberia and Congo with unprecedented access to the field operations of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), LIVING IN EMERGENCY follows four volunteer doctors as they struggle to provide emergency medical care under extreme conditions.