Posts tagged lebanon

Photo by Marjie Middleton/MSF
"We’ve heard stories of women left to deliver on their own in a tent. Such stories are very upsetting to me as a midwife, because I know how dangerous it is and how awful it must be for a mother to give birth scared and alone.” - MSF midwife in Lebanon working with pregnant Syrian refugees  Read the story 

Photo by Marjie Middleton/MSF

"We’ve heard stories of women left to deliver on their own in a tent. Such stories are very upsetting to me as a midwife, because I know how dangerous it is and how awful it must be for a mother to give birth scared and alone.” - MSF midwife in Lebanon working with pregnant Syrian refugees  Read the story 

"Our patients are an eclectic profile. Some are traditionally dressed and come from rural parts of Syria. These include the Bedouin people, who often have facial tattooing and traditional dress. Many women wear the burka. Some people are clothed in typical modern-day European/American attire of jeans and t-shirt. These people are generally from the cities such as Homs, Damascus and Aleppo. Despite their aesthetic differences, they have something in common. They have all lost everything they owned. They have all witnessed horrendous tragedy and acts of violence. They are all mourning the deaths of loved ones. And what is worse, they are living in fear about the fate of loved ones who are unaccounted for, left behind in Syria." - MSF doctor Aoife Doran in Tripoli.
Read more: http://blogs.msf.org/aoifed/2013/05/swing-of-things/
Photo © Aurelie Lachant/MSF

"Our patients are an eclectic profile. Some are traditionally dressed and come from rural parts of Syria. These include the Bedouin people, who often have facial tattooing and traditional dress. Many women wear the burka. Some people are clothed in typical modern-day European/American attire of jeans and t-shirt. These people are generally from the cities such as Homs, Damascus and Aleppo. Despite their aesthetic differences, they have something in common. They have all lost everything they owned. They have all witnessed horrendous tragedy and acts of violence. They are all mourning the deaths of loved ones. And what is worse, they are living in fear about the fate of loved ones who are unaccounted for, left behind in Syria." - MSF doctor Aoife Doran in Tripoli.

Read more: http://blogs.msf.org/aoifed/2013/05/swing-of-things/

Photo © Aurelie Lachant/MSF

Today I am embarking on my first mission as a medical doctor with Médecins Sans Frontières. I am both ardent and excited! Now that I have finally filled my backpack to bursting capacity and am ready to go, I would like to tell you a little bit about what I will be doing.

My mission is based in Tripoli, a city in Northern Lebanon. Tripoli lies 31km from the border with Syria (which lies to the north and the east of Lebanon), and it has has now become host to tens of thousands of Syrian refugees who are fleeing their own country due to the ongoing devastation and turmoil there. Hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees have arrived in Lebanon thus far.

Meet Irish doctor Aoife Doran who is leaving for Lebanon where she will be providing healthcare for Syrian refugees and vulnerable Lebanese people. Please leave your questions and comments for Aoife below his post.

"A Humiliating Situation": Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

Meet some of the more than 120,000 Syrian refugees living in the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon while their country is at war. Families are living in camps, unfinished houses, and abandoned buildings; most are not getting adequate aid.

Registration should not be a condition for receiving assistance in any emergency crisis. Yet access to humanitarian aid is seriously hampered by the difficulties many refugees encounter in registering on arrival in Lebanon. The roll out of aid must be accelerated and expanded.
Photo: An elderly Syrian refugee suffering from Parkinson’s disease sleeps in a room in a ramshackle home on a cattle ground in Tripoli, Lebanon, surrounded by his daughter-in-law and granddaughter. Lebanon 2013 © Michael Goldfarb
Lebanon: Aid Lags Far Behind as Syrian Refugees Increase
Syrians who have fled violent conflict at home to seek safety in Lebanon do not receive anywhere near adequate levels of humanitarian assistance and are living in extremely precarious conditions, a detailed survey released today by MSF.
The MSF report, “Misery Beyond the War Zone,” shows that of the 220,000Syrians who have sought refuge so far in Lebanon, many cannot obtain necessary health care, among other worrying findings. The survey, which follows a similarstudy carried out by MSF six months ago, reveals a marked deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Lebanon, in large part due to extremely lengthy registration delays. Refugees in Lebanon are not entitled to formal assistance if they are not registered. Lebanon is home to the largest number of Syrian refugees.

Photo: An elderly Syrian refugee suffering from Parkinson’s disease sleeps in a room in a ramshackle home on a cattle ground in Tripoli, Lebanon, surrounded by his daughter-in-law and granddaughter. Lebanon 2013 © Michael Goldfarb

Lebanon: Aid Lags Far Behind as Syrian Refugees Increase

Syrians who have fled violent conflict at home to seek safety in Lebanon do not receive anywhere near adequate levels of humanitarian assistance and are living in extremely precarious conditions, a detailed survey released today by MSF.

The MSF report, “Misery Beyond the War Zone,” shows that of the 220,000Syrians who have sought refuge so far in Lebanon, many cannot obtain necessary health care, among other worrying findings. The survey, which follows a similarstudy carried out by MSF six months ago, reveals a marked deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Lebanon, in large part due to extremely lengthy registration delays. Refugees in Lebanon are not entitled to formal assistance if they are not registered. Lebanon is home to the largest number of Syrian refugees.

The situation is extremely bad. We have no sewage system and had to dig holes in the ground. When it rains the water flows into the tents so the kids get sick. It’s also very cold and most families don’t have heaters, so we have to burn all sorts of materials. The kids are sick. Ourmost important concern here right now is medical care. We need doctors.
Syrian refugee from Deir Zenoun Camp, on the Misery Beyond the War Zone. 
Syrian Refugees in Lebanon Living in Fear and Uncertainty


While Lebanon has absorbed tens of thousands of refugees fleeing the conflict in neighboring Syria in recent months, many people are living in overcrowded conditions, suffering psychological distress, are fearful for their safety, and are unable to afford medical care, said the international medical humanitarian organization MSF in a report released today.

The MSF report, Fleeing the violence in Syria: Syrian Refugees in Lebanon, details the living conditions and health of the refugees and the major challenges facing them, including access to housing, food, water, sanitation, health care, and security. Most refugees are settling in economically disadvantaged regions of Lebanon, placing an additional burden on already overstretched resources. Gaps are appearing in refugees’ access to medical care, particularly hospital care and treatment for chronic diseases.Photo: An MSF family doctor examines a young Syrian patient.
Lebanon 2012 © Nagham Awada/MSF

Syrian Refugees in Lebanon Living in Fear and Uncertainty

While Lebanon has absorbed tens of thousands of refugees fleeing the conflict in neighboring Syria in recent months, many people are living in overcrowded conditions, suffering psychological distress, are fearful for their safety, and are unable to afford medical care, said the international medical humanitarian organization MSF in a report released today.

The MSF report, Fleeing the violence in Syria: Syrian Refugees in Lebanon, details the living conditions and health of the refugees and the major challenges facing them, including access to housing, food, water, sanitation, health care, and security. Most refugees are settling in economically disadvantaged regions of Lebanon, placing an additional burden on already overstretched resources. Gaps are appearing in refugees’ access to medical care, particularly hospital care and treatment for chronic diseases.

Photo: An MSF family doctor examines a young Syrian patient. Lebanon 2012 © Nagham Awada/MSF

Then, injured people started coming from everywhere. We had to come up with other ways of accommodating people, even if it meant putting beds on the terrace. Sometimes the wounded didn’t arrive during the day because of fighting, because the roads were blocked, or because traveling to the hospital was risky. Sometimes they came at night or at dawn.
Surgical specialist Anna Nowak has completed more than 20 missions with MSF. She has just returned from Syria, where she helped to set up a refugee hospital project.

MSF has been working on the ground in Syria for the past two months, trying to provide humanitarian assistance to people affected by the conflict. With the help of a group of Syrian doctors, in six days a team was able to transform an empty house into an emergency hospital where wounded people could be operated on and hospitalized.
Some came from far away, having traveled up to 150 kilometers [about 93 miles] to reach us. A good number arrived long after the initial injury had occurred rather than in the acute or semi-acute phase, [with] some arriving simply too late to be saved. Among them were patients who had not been able to have any post-operative care after their surgery, patients who received inadequate care and others who hadn’t received any medical care at all.
Kelly Dilworth, an MSF anesthetist who has worked for MSF for nine years, spent one month on mission in Syria. She recalls the pain of the wounded people she was treating and the severity of their injuries in a context where it’s difficult to get appropriate care in time.
Meeting the Health Needs of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon
MSF Assists Syrians Fleeing ConflictMore than 20,700 Syrians who have fled their country are now officially registered in Lebanon, out of 27,000 reported by the UN Refugee Agency. Most of them are living in the north and the Bekaa valley. Some are staying with relatives or with the local community; others are living in public buildings or abandoned houses. Most have few possessions, and life is a daily struggle. Health services and local NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] are also coming under strain.

The Syrian crisis is having a growing impact in Lebanon, especially in the border regions and Tripoli. Since mid-April, we have expanded our mental health care services to Tripoli governmental hospital, located in one the most conflict-ridden areas, and an MSF emergency doctor is also helping in the hospital’s emergency department. MSF plans to reinforce its capacity to provide emergency medical care for civilians directly or indirectly affected by the violence by working in a hospital and two health centers.Photo: An MSF staff member attends to a Syrian family that fled across the border to Aarsal.

Lebanon 2012 © MSF

Meeting the Health Needs of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon
MSF Assists Syrians Fleeing Conflict


More than 20,700 Syrians who have fled their country are now officially registered in Lebanon, out of 27,000 reported by the UN Refugee Agency. Most of them are living in the north and the Bekaa valley. Some are staying with relatives or with the local community; others are living in public buildings or abandoned houses. Most have few possessions, and life is a daily struggle. Health services and local NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] are also coming under strain.

The Syrian crisis is having a growing impact in Lebanon, especially in the border regions and Tripoli. Since mid-April, we have expanded our mental health care services to Tripoli governmental hospital, located in one the most conflict-ridden areas, and an MSF emergency doctor is also helping in the hospital’s emergency department. MSF plans to reinforce its capacity to provide emergency medical care for civilians directly or indirectly affected by the violence by working in a hospital and two health centers.

Photo: An MSF staff member attends to a Syrian family that fled across the border to Aarsal.
Lebanon 2012 © MSF

A story from the video vaults of MSF:

Mouna’s Story: An Iraqi Girl Struggles to Walk Again

The final and 5th part of a 5 part series

This video series from 2007 follows Mouna, a young girl who suffered severe injuries in Iraq, learning to walk again on artificial limbs with the help of MSF surgeons and physiotherapists in Amman, Jordan. MSF opened the program in 2006 to provide specialized reconstructive surgery to civilians wounded in the conflict.

Thanks for tuning in to learn about Mouna’s story!

If you missed the other films in the series go here:
Part 1 
Part 2 
Part 3
Part 4


Check out more about MSF’s work in Iraq here.

Lebanon: Healing Those Deeply Affected

Recently, with thousands of Syrians—many of whom have physical wounds—fleeing the violence in their country and seeking refuge in Lebanon, we dispatched medical teams to evaluate their health status. This resulted in our setting up a new health program in Wadi Khaled, in the north of Lebanon, in November 2011. We have been working in Lebanon for three years, and were therefore in a position to closely monitor the health situation for Syrians arriving in the country.

Read more about the work of MSF in Northern Lebanon here.

Photo: Lebanon 2010 © Dina Debbas

Lebanon: Healing Those Deeply Affected

Recently, with thousands of Syrians—many of whom have physical wounds—fleeing the violence in their country and seeking refuge in Lebanon, we dispatched medical teams to evaluate their health status. This resulted in our setting up a new health program in Wadi Khaled, in the north of Lebanon, in November 2011. We have been working in Lebanon for three years, and were therefore in a position to closely monitor the health situation for Syrians arriving in the country.

Read more about the work of MSF in Northern Lebanon here.

Photo: Lebanon 2010 © Dina Debbas

1976War in Lebanon

MSF conducts surgery in the organization’s first major response in a war zone.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Zimbabwe 1981 © MSF

1976
War in Lebanon

MSF conducts surgery in the organization’s first major response in a war zone.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Zimbabwe 1981 © MSF