Posts tagged jordan

Photo: Left to Right: Faces from MSF’s Amman project: Ali Abdel al-Kharim, a 13-year-old Iraqi from Baghdad, was severely burned on his face, arms, and legs when a car bomb exploded as he walked to school; Khanda Faraj Mohammed, 27, from Kirkuk, sustained severe burns on her neck, chest, stomach, arms, and hands when a car bomb exploded at the market where she shopped; Waleed Azziz Mohammed, 26, from Dahouk, was badly burned on his face and neck when he was hit by a rocket. Jordan 2011 © J.B. Russell
Field Journal: A Regional Surgical Center
Patricia Kahn, MSF-USA’s medical editor, recently visited MSF’s surgical program in Amman, Jordan, which treats patients from throughout the Middle East.
Patients in the Amman program are civilians wounded by bombs, explosions, or gunshots in conflicts across the region. They have severe, complicated injuries that were not treated right away, or couldn’t be treated properly in their home country. Injuries such as bones that aren’t just broken, but shattered. Burns over much of the body. Many also have life-threatening bone infections, often with antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Photo: Left to Right: Faces from MSF’s Amman project: Ali Abdel al-Kharim, a 13-year-old Iraqi from Baghdad, was severely burned on his face, arms, and legs when a car bomb exploded as he walked to school; Khanda Faraj Mohammed, 27, from Kirkuk, sustained severe burns on her neck, chest, stomach, arms, and hands when a car bomb exploded at the market where she shopped; Waleed Azziz Mohammed, 26, from Dahouk, was badly burned on his face and neck when he was hit by a rocket. Jordan 2011 © J.B. Russell


Field Journal: A Regional Surgical Center

Patricia Kahn, MSF-USA’s medical editor, recently visited MSF’s surgical program in Amman, Jordan, which treats patients from throughout the Middle East.

Patients in the Amman program are civilians wounded by bombs, explosions, or gunshots in conflicts across the region. They have severe, complicated injuries that were not treated right away, or couldn’t be treated properly in their home country. Injuries such as bones that aren’t just broken, but shattered. Burns over much of the body. Many also have life-threatening bone infections, often with antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

"Medical Outreach in Jordan Tends to Its Neighbors’ Wounded"

Read this report from the New York Times on Doctors Without Borders’ teams treating victims of Syria conflict in a Jordan hospital.

Learn more about the situation in Syria.

Wounded Syrians Arrive in Jordan

A specialized Doctors Without Borders surgical team performs operations in a hospital in nearby Amman. Dr. Mohamed, a member of the team, came to Ramtha to determine whether any of the new arrivals were in need of orthopedic surgery. “The wounded people we see here have already received urgent care in Syria,” he says. “They usually have old wounds that date back several weeks or months.”

The refugee camps in Ramtha are more like transit camps, and Syrians generally do not stay very long. Dr. Mohamed visits Ramtha every few days. He gives his telephone number to the wounded patients he sees so that they can contact him when they reach Amman and arrange to be seen.

The wounded all have stories to tell. Twenty-five-year-old X*. lifts his polo shirt to show angry purple-red marks on his back. His arms were also lacerated when he was hit with rubber cables after being arrested while participating in a demonstration in Deraa. He says he was tortured in prison, where he remained for 17 days before he was transferred to Damascus. He was freed en route during an attack by the Free Syrian Army and immediately set out for Jordan.

*Names withheld to protect patient identity.

A story from the video vaults of MSF:

Mouna’s Story: An Iraqi Girl Struggles to Walk Again

Part 1 of a 5 part series

This video series from 2007 follows Mouna, a young girl who suffered severe injuries in Iraq, learning to walk again on artificial limbs with the help of MSF surgeons and physiotherapists in Amman, Jordan. MSF opened the program in 2006 to provide specialized reconstructive surgery to civilians wounded in the conflict.

Tune in tomorrow for Part 2 of Mouna’s story.

Check out more about MSF’s work in Iraq here.

Khanda Faraj Mohammed, 27 years old, mother of three and pregnant with her fourth child was severely burned in a car bomb explosion while shopping in the market of Kirkuk in Iraq. She is being treated in a program run by Medécins Sans Frontières (MSF) that cares for Iraqi victims of violence whose injuries can not be treated inside Iraq. The program is now beginning to receive patients from Yemen, Syria, Egypt and Libya in addition to Iraqis. See more on the MSF photo blog.

Photo: © J.B. Russel

Khanda Faraj Mohammed, 27 years old, mother of three and pregnant with her fourth child was severely burned in a car bomb explosion while shopping in the market of Kirkuk in Iraq. She is being treated in a program run by Medécins Sans Frontières (MSF) that cares for Iraqi victims of violence whose injuries can not be treated inside Iraq. The program is now beginning to receive patients from Yemen, Syria, Egypt and Libya in addition to Iraqis. See more on the MSF photo blog.

Photo: © J.B. Russel

2006Surgical Care for Victims of War in Iraq

Unable to work safely in Iraq, MSF sets up a reconstructive surgical program in Amman, Jordan to treat severely war-wounded patients referred by medical colleagues in Iraq.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Jordan 2007 © Jiro Ose

2006
Surgical Care for Victims of War in Iraq

Unable to work safely in Iraq, MSF sets up a reconstructive surgical program in Amman, Jordan to treat severely war-wounded patients referred by medical colleagues in Iraq.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Jordan 2007 © Jiro Ose