Posts tagged infographic

Some 2.96 million people are currently displaced in DR Congo  and many of them have no access to humanitarian assistance. Many communities are cut off from medical care due to poor infrastructure, displacement and conflict, and adequate assistance is not being provided in rural and conflict-affected areas by aid organizations and by the state. At the same time, violence against civilians, medical staff and property is commonplace, and health care providers are regularly required to suspend operations, leaving people deprived of the medical care they urgently need. Read MSF’s report, “Everyday Emergency: Silent Suffering in Democratic Republic of Congo”: http://bit.ly/1mT34fk

Some 2.96 million people are currently displaced in DR Congo  and many of them have no access to humanitarian assistance. Many communities are cut off from medical care due to poor infrastructure, displacement and conflict, and adequate assistance is not being provided in rural and conflict-affected areas by aid organizations and by the state. At the same time, violence against civilians, medical staff and property is commonplace, and health care providers are regularly required to suspend operations, leaving people deprived of the medical care they urgently need. Read MSF’s report, “Everyday Emergency: Silent Suffering in Democratic Republic of Congo”: http://bit.ly/1mT34fk

President Obama is expected to push for finalization of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) in tonight’s State of the Union address. MSF is deeply concerned that unless damaging provisions are removed before negotiations are finalized, the TPP agreement could become the most harmful trade pact ever for access to medicines in developing countries. Read why and help us fight back: http://bit.ly/ZLBmEl

President Obama is expected to push for finalization of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) in tonight’s State of the Union address. MSF is deeply concerned that unless damaging provisions are removed before negotiations are finalized, the TPP agreement could become the most harmful trade pact ever for access to medicines in developing countries. Read why and help us fight back: http://bit.ly/ZLBmEl

MSF is calling for better, safer treatment for drug-resistant TB - this is a major reason why. Read more: http://bit.ly/1gcE3r5

MSF is calling for better, safer treatment for drug-resistant TB - this is a major reason why. Read more: http://bit.ly/1gcE3r5

Should going deaf be the price you pay to recover from drug-resistant TB? We need better treatment now! http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/

Should going deaf be the price you pay to recover from drug-resistant TB? We need better treatment now! http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/

How many pills does a multi-drug resistant TB patient have to swallow? We need better treatment for TB now! http://www.msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/

“Refugee children are incredibly vulnerable to developing vaccine-preventable diseases, so why do we keep hearing the players in the global vaccination community tell us these kids aren’t their problem?” asked Kate Elder, vaccines policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. Read more

“Refugee children are incredibly vulnerable to developing vaccine-preventable diseases, so why do we keep hearing the players in the global vaccination community tell us these kids aren’t their problem?” asked Kate Elder, vaccines policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. Read more

432,000 routine vaccinations, 78,500 surgeries, 1,642,800 malaria cases treated! Take a look at Doctors Without Borders in 2012 by the numbers.

432,000 routine vaccinations, 78,500 surgeries, 1,642,800 malaria cases treated! Take a look at Doctors Without Borders in 2012 by the numbers.

MSF Access: Dear GAVI Campaign
MSF vaccinates millions of people each year and fully supports the introduction of new vaccines in developing countries. But negotiations between companies and the largely taxpayer-funded GAVI Alliance for the newest vaccines have not resulted in deeper price cuts that would help more children benefit. The lack of transparency by companies on vaccine manufacturing costs and their focus on profits above ensuring sustainable prices for vaccines for low-income countries are at the root of the problem.
Help MSF and send GAVI a message on Twitter asking for them to open up their lower prices to non-governmental organisations and humanitarian actors like MSF now.
CLICK HERE TO SEND A TWEET.

MSF Access: Dear GAVI Campaign

MSF vaccinates millions of people each year and fully supports the introduction of new vaccines in developing countries. But negotiations between companies and the largely taxpayer-funded GAVI Alliance for the newest vaccines have not resulted in deeper price cuts that would help more children benefit. The lack of transparency by companies on vaccine manufacturing costs and their focus on profits above ensuring sustainable prices for vaccines for low-income countries are at the root of the problem.

Help MSF and send GAVI a message on Twitter asking for them to open up their lower prices to non-governmental organisations and humanitarian actors like MSF now.

CLICK HERE TO SEND A TWEET.

Test Me, Treat Me: A Drug-Resistant TB Manifesto
As the epidemic continues to spread, Drug-resistant TB becomes increasingly hard to tackle. The treatment is too long, too toxic, and too costly – the drugs alone cost at least $4,000 just to treat one person. We want to save many more lives, but we desperately need shorter, safer and more effective treatment to do so.
We, the undersigned people with DR-TB and those involved in their care, here raise the alarm about the devastating toll this disease is taking on us, our families and communities across the globe, and therefore make the following three demands:
1) We call for universal access to DR-TB diagnosis and treatment now.2) We call for better treatment regimens: the TB research community, including research institutes and drug companies, must urgently deliver effective, more tolerable, shorter and affordable DR-TB drug regimens.3) We call for more financial support to increase DR-TB treatment, and a commitment to support research into developing better treatment

Test Me, Treat Me: A Drug-Resistant TB Manifesto

As the epidemic continues to spread, Drug-resistant TB becomes increasingly hard to tackle. The treatment is too long, too toxic, and too costly – the drugs alone cost at least $4,000 just to treat one person. We want to save many more lives, but we desperately need shorter, safer and more effective treatment to do so.

We, the undersigned people with DR-TB and those involved in their care, here raise the alarm about the devastating toll this disease is taking on us, our families and communities across the globe, and therefore make the following three demands:

1) We call for universal access to DR-TB diagnosis and treatment now.
2) We call for better treatment regimens: the TB research community, including research institutes and drug companies, must urgently deliver effective, more tolerable, shorter and affordable DR-TB drug regimens.
3) We call for more financial support to increase DR-TB treatment, and a commitment to support research into developing better treatment

Test Me, Treat Me: A Drug-Resistant TB Manifesto
We, the people infected with drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), live in every part of the world. Most of us were exposed and became infected with DR-TB because of the poor conditions in which we live. Undiagnosed, this disease spreads among us. Untreated, this disease kills. But in the countries in which we live, fast and accurate diagnosis is rarely available, and only about one in five of us actually get effective DR-TB treatment. 
Those of us “lucky” enough to receive treatment have to go through an excruciating two-year journey where we must swallow up to 20 pills a day and receive a painful injection every day for the first 8 months, making it hard to sit or even lie down. For many of us, the treatment makes us feel sicker than the disease itself, as it causes nausea, body aches, and rashes. The drugs make many of us go deaf permanently, and some of us develop psychosis.

Test Me, Treat Me: A Drug-Resistant TB Manifesto

We, the people infected with drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), live in every part of the world. Most of us were exposed and became infected with DR-TB because of the poor conditions in which we live. Undiagnosed, this disease spreads among us. Untreated, this disease kills. But in the countries in which we live, fast and accurate diagnosis is rarely available, and only about one in five of us actually get effective DR-TB treatment.

Those of us “lucky” enough to receive treatment have to go through an excruciating two-year journey where we must swallow up to 20 pills a day and receive a painful injection every day for the first 8 months, making it hard to sit or even lie down. For many of us, the treatment makes us feel sicker than the disease itself, as it causes nausea, body aches, and rashes. The drugs make many of us go deaf permanently, and some of us develop psychosis.

Test Me, Treat Me: A Drug-Resistant TB Manifesto
People with drug-resistant TB and their medical providers worldwide call for urgent change. To learn more about MDR-TB and the manifesto, visit msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto

Test Me, Treat Me: A Drug-Resistant TB Manifesto

People with drug-resistant TB and their medical providers worldwide call for urgent change. To learn more about MDR-TB and the manifesto, visit msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto

Current treatment for dr-tb is complex and inadequate. For the first time in half a century drugs that could cure DR-TB are being tested, but the global health community needs to act fast.
Drug-resistant tuberculosis: we can stop this epidemic in its tracksThis article was originally published on The Guardian
DR-TB is a public health crisis that is spiralling out of control – the latest statistics from the World Health Organisation suggest more than 300,000 new cases every year among notified TB cases, a figure that Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) considers conservative based on the growing number of DR-TB patients in our projects. Once the preserve of people who had received incomplete or incorrect TB treatment, a growing number of people with DR-TB are presenting who have never had TB treatment before, which shows that DR-TB is becoming an epidemic in its own right.

Yet, the tools to tackle the disease remain woefully inadequate. People with DR-TB are forced to take up to 20 pills a day with excruciating side effects that range from deafness to nausea and psychosis. For healthcare professionals, the treatment is complex: individualised for each patient based on drug resistance patterns, and expensive, with drugs alone costing up to $ 6,000 (£3,962) per person for a treatment course. And even then, patients only have a 50% chance of cure.

However, after half a century of neglect there is a historic opportunity for change. The drug pipeline for TB is the best it has ever been, with 10 drugs in clinical testing. At the very end of 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved bedaquiline or Sirturo, the first dedicated new TB drug since 1963, while another drug, delamanid is currently undergoing review by the European Medicines Agency. Both drugs arecompletely new classes of antibiotics with no reported resistance, and represent an unprecedented opportunity to improve treatment for DR-TB.

So what do these developments mean for global health professionals – particularly those on the front-line treating TB in communities?

These new drugs could be game-changers and the TB community must urgently work out how best to use them. They offer the potential to make DR-TB treatment shorter, more effective and more tolerable, with fewer side effects. The first step is to make these new drugs available for research and ensure they are quickly registered in high-burden countries. The manufacturers must also make sure the drugs are affordable in low- and middle-income countries, eg through generic production.
The response of drug manufacturers to generic HIV drugs is perhaps the best incentive to do things differently with DR-TB: before the introduction of generic competition in 2001, antiretrovirals to treat HIV cost over US$10,000 per person per year and very few people in developing countries could afford that. As a result, millions of people died and the peak of AIDS related-deaths didn’t occur until 2005. Since 2001, the price has come down nearly 99% and people now have access to affordable medicines. With eight million people now on treatment, the curve of AIDS related-deaths has started to fall, but we still need to expand access to a total of 15 million people by 2015. New infections are also falling.

Current treatment for dr-tb is complex and inadequate. For the first time in half a century drugs that could cure DR-TB are being tested, but the global health community needs to act fast.

Drug-resistant tuberculosis: we can stop this epidemic in its tracks
This article was originally published on The Guardian

DR-TB is a public health crisis that is spiralling out of control – the latest statistics from the World Health Organisation suggest more than 300,000 new cases every year among notified TB cases, a figure that Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) considers conservative based on the growing number of DR-TB patients in our projects. Once the preserve of people who had received incomplete or incorrect TB treatment, a growing number of people with DR-TB are presenting who have never had TB treatment before, which shows that DR-TB is becoming an epidemic in its own right.

Yet, the tools to tackle the disease remain woefully inadequate. People with DR-TB are forced to take up to 20 pills a day with excruciating side effects that range from deafness to nausea and psychosis. For healthcare professionals, the treatment is complex: individualised for each patient based on drug resistance patterns, and expensive, with drugs alone costing up to $ 6,000 (£3,962) per person for a treatment course. And even then, patients only have a 50% chance of cure.

However, after half a century of neglect there is a historic opportunity for change. The drug pipeline for TB is the best it has ever been, with 10 drugs in clinical testing. At the very end of 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved bedaquiline or Sirturo, the first dedicated new TB drug since 1963, while another drug, delamanid is currently undergoing review by the European Medicines Agency. Both drugs arecompletely new classes of antibiotics with no reported resistance, and represent an unprecedented opportunity to improve treatment for DR-TB.

So what do these developments mean for global health professionals – particularly those on the front-line treating TB in communities?

These new drugs could be game-changers and the TB community must urgently work out how best to use them. They offer the potential to make DR-TB treatment shorter, more effective and more tolerable, with fewer side effects. The first step is to make these new drugs available for research and ensure they are quickly registered in high-burden countries. The manufacturers must also make sure the drugs are affordable in low- and middle-income countries, eg through generic production.

The response of drug manufacturers to generic HIV drugs is perhaps the best incentive to do things differently with DR-TB: before the introduction of generic competition in 2001, antiretrovirals to treat HIV cost over US$10,000 per person per year and very few people in developing countries could afford that. As a result, millions of people died and the peak of AIDS related-deaths didn’t occur until 2005. Since 2001, the price has come down nearly 99% and people now have access to affordable medicines. With eight million people now on treatment, the curve of AIDS related-deaths has started to fall, but we still need to expand access to a total of 15 million people by 2015. New infections are also falling.

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MSF in 40 seconds from MSF on Vimeo.

Doctors Without Borders in 40 Seconds

This short animation introduces Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) — from it’s creation by a group of doctors and journalists in 1971 to the worldwide emergency medical aid organization that today is operating in over 60 countries.

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Chagas: Silent Killer
Vaccines: The Price of Protecting a Child from Killer Diseases
"Adding new vaccines to the national immunization program is like taking out multiple mortgages."—Ministry of Health Official, Kenya
Each year, the lives of two and a half million children are saved because they are protected against killer diseases through vaccination. Vaccinating with new vaccines should save many more lives, but high prices could prevent this from happening.

Vaccines: The Price of Protecting a Child from Killer Diseases

"Adding new vaccines to the national immunization program is like taking out multiple mortgages."—Ministry of Health Official, Kenya

Each year, the lives of two and a half million children are saved because they are protected against killer diseases through vaccination. Vaccinating with new vaccines should save many more lives, but high prices could prevent this from happening.