Posts tagged imran

This strange, inhospitable, impossible place that is now home for 15,000, 65,000, 115,000 people who had to run here.

I don’t think about this a lot, because it seems like an impossible thought. To try to understand what it might feel like to have no home to go to anymore. The Ingessana are of their place, very much so. I can’t see it in the faces or the eyes of the people who I work with here, the people on my team who come from the refugee population. Strangely, they seem happy, in such good spirits. I’m confused by a lot of my staff actually. If I was bombed out of my home, I would be shit mad, totally crushed.

Imran takes a philosophical look at humanitarian life: what it means to be constantly on the move and away from home. Please leave your comments and questions for Imran in the comments box below his blog post. 
Photo:Women gather at a water tap in T3, the temporary transit site for new arrivals near Jamam. South Sudan 2012 © Shannon Jensen
When the Tap Runs Dry
On Thursday, the pumps at the Bamtiko borehole—the main source of water for Jamam refugee camp—had failed. Imran, MSF’s water and sanitation specialist, led his team in a quick emergency response to replenish and treat the water supply. 
“By the time evening came around that first wet day, I was covered in mud, exhausted, hungry, my clothes bleached by spilled chlorine — a day well-lived. I’m looking forward to doing it again,” says Imran. Read more from his blog on ensuring water treatment in South Sudan.

Photo:Women gather at a water tap in T3, the temporary transit site for new arrivals near Jamam. South Sudan 2012 © Shannon Jensen

When the Tap Runs Dry

On Thursday, the pumps at the Bamtiko borehole—the main source of water for Jamam refugee camp—had failed. Imran, MSF’s water and sanitation specialist, led his team in a quick emergency response to replenish and treat the water supply. 

By the time evening came around that first wet day, I was covered in mud, exhausted, hungry, my clothes bleached by spilled chlorine — a day well-lived. I’m looking forward to doing it again,” says Imran. Read more from his blog on ensuring water treatment in South Sudan.