Posts tagged hospital

From the series MSF in 2013:
“Without donations, we wouldn’t have medications, we wouldn’t have IV solutions, we wouldn’t be able to set up an operating tent within a chicken farm, we couldn’t fly to and from the area of conflict … without donor participation, Doctors Without Borders couldn’t be anywhere.”—Dr. Steve Rubin, Doctors Without Borders surgeon in Syria
An MSF team set up an inflatable hospital on the site of a hospital that was destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Photo © Yann Libessart

From the series MSF in 2013:

“Without donations, we wouldn’t have medications, we wouldn’t have IV solutions, we wouldn’t be able to set up an operating tent within a chicken farm, we couldn’t fly to and from the area of conflict … without donor participation, Doctors Without Borders couldn’t be anywhere.”
—Dr. Steve Rubin, Doctors Without Borders surgeon in Syria

An MSF team set up an inflatable hospital on the site of a hospital that was destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Photo © Yann Libessart

Photo by Sven Torfinn
Swaziland is in the middle of a medical crisis. The highest HIV prevalence in the world and the emergence of drug-resistant TB threaten to have a disastrous effect on the social and economic situation there. 
Millions of people in developing countries are still waiting for the AIDS revolution. Join us for a Twitter chat on how millions of people are still waiting for the AIDS revolution: Friday, Dec. 6, 11am EST/5pm CET @MSF_SouthAfrica

Photo by Sven Torfinn

Swaziland is in the middle of a medical crisis. The highest HIV prevalence in the world and the emergence of drug-resistant TB threaten to have a disastrous effect on the social and economic situation there.

Millions of people in developing countries are still waiting for the AIDS revolution. Join us for a Twitter chat on how millions of people are still waiting for the AIDS revolution: Friday, Dec. 6, 11am EST/5pm CET @MSF_SouthAfrica

People living with HIV often face stigma and discrimination. Ko Tin Than lost everything when people found out he was HIV-positive. It even led to him stopping his treatment for a while. 

The fight against HIV/AIDS has been hailed as one of the most successful public health projects in human history, but MSF medical teams see the revolution as unfulfilled for millions of people excluded from treatment. Go to See.MSF.org to learn more.

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Roughly one in 10 people in Central African Republic (CAR) have been driven from their homes by violence that has overwhelmed the country since a coup in March 2013. "We are extremely concerned about the living conditions of the displaced,” said Sylvain Groulx, MSF head of mission in CAR, “who are overcrowded in churches, mosques, or schools, or living in the bush with no access to health care, food, or water, and are threatened by epidemics. Much more needs to be done and it needs to be done now."

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Roughly one in 10 people in Central African Republic (CAR) have been driven from their homes by violence that has overwhelmed the country since a coup in March 2013. "We are extremely concerned about the living conditions of the displaced,” said Sylvain Groulx, MSF head of mission in CAR, “who are overcrowded in churches, mosques, or schools, or living in the bush with no access to health care, food, or water, and are threatened by epidemics. Much more needs to be done and it needs to be done now."

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
New fighting and threats against civilians near the town of Bouca, Central African Republic (CAR), have pushed hundreds more people out of their homes, making the massive humanitarian crisis in this country even more severe. Read more: http://bit.ly/1ey3Kzq

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

New fighting and threats against civilians near the town of Bouca, Central African Republic (CAR), have pushed hundreds more people out of their homes, making the massive humanitarian crisis in this country even more severe. Read more: http://bit.ly/1ey3Kzq

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
New fighting and threats against civilians near the town of Bouca, Central African Republic (CAR), have pushed hundreds more people out of their homes, making the massive humanitarian crisis in this country even more severe. Watch our webcast on the situation in CAR on Dec. 4: http://disasterignored.eventbrite.com/

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

New fighting and threats against civilians near the town of Bouca, Central African Republic (CAR), have pushed hundreds more people out of their homes, making the massive humanitarian crisis in this country even more severe. Watch our webcast on the situation in CAR on Dec. 4: http://disasterignored.eventbrite.com/

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Years of political and military instability in CAR have left the country in a chronic state of humanitarian crisis, particularly as it pertains to public health. The Ministry of Health has almost no presence outside of Bangui, the capital. There is just one doctor per 55,000 people and one nurse or midwife per 7,000 residents, according the United Nations, and most of those are in the capital. Read more: http://bit.ly/1exTtTP

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Years of political and military instability in CAR have left the country in a chronic state of humanitarian crisis, particularly as it pertains to public health. The Ministry of Health has almost no presence outside of Bangui, the capital. There is just one doctor per 55,000 people and one nurse or midwife per 7,000 residents, according the United Nations, and most of those are in the capital. Read more: http://bit.ly/1exTtTP

Photo by Ton Koene
Join us Dec. 4 for “Disaster, Ignored”, a webcast on the current situation in Central African Republic (CAR). Violence in CAR has raged on over the last year, displacing some 400,000 people and further worsening their access to health care. MSF Director of Operations Marie-Noelle Rodrigue, and two US-based aid workers, nurse Michelle Mays and Dr. Yolaine Civil, will lead the discussion. Register here: http://disasterignored.eventbrite.com/

Photo by Ton Koene

Join us Dec. 4 for “Disaster, Ignored”, a webcast on the current situation in Central African Republic (CAR). Violence in CAR has raged on over the last year, displacing some 400,000 people and further worsening their access to health care. MSF Director of Operations Marie-Noelle Rodrigue, and two US-based aid workers, nurse Michelle Mays and Dr. Yolaine Civil, will lead the discussion. Register here: http://disasterignored.eventbrite.com/

Photo by Jacob Zocherman
These two women in the maternity ward of Bria hospital in Central African Republic have just had miscarriages. One of them must recover on the floor because there are so few beds in so few health facilities in the area. This photo was taken shortly before MSF opened an emergency project in Bria.

Photo by Jacob Zocherman

These two women in the maternity ward of Bria hospital in Central African Republic have just had miscarriages. One of them must recover on the floor because there are so few beds in so few health facilities in the area. This photo was taken shortly before MSF opened an emergency project in Bria.

Photo by Ron Haviv/VII Photo
The new Childhood TB Roadmap could help reverse years of neglect:http://bit.ly/1eWUFT0 

Photo by Ron Haviv/VII Photo

The new Childhood TB Roadmap could help reverse years of neglect:http://bit.ly/1eWUFT0 

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII PhotoAn MSF nurse treats a patient at MSF’s free cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince on Wednesday. The cholera outbreak that began in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake continues to devastate people’s lives. Funding for treatment of the disease has fallen sharply in the last year, leaving people without care or making them pay for it. MSF treated 23,000 people for cholera in 2012.

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII Photo
An MSF nurse treats a patient at MSF’s free cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince on Wednesday. The cholera outbreak that began in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake continues to devastate people’s lives. Funding for treatment of the disease has fallen sharply in the last year, leaving people without care or making them pay for it. MSF treated 23,000 people for cholera in 2012.

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII PhotoAt MSF’s cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince, the head doctor, who comes from Ghana, treated this emergency patient on Wednesday. People continue to deal with this deadly disease that first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. The photographer said: “It’s inspiring, though, knowing that every single person in the hospitalization ward will survive because they’re receiving medical attention. It’s been some time since I’ve worked with MSF, and I forgot how much I respect the organization and how moved I am by their work.”

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII Photo
At MSF’s cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince, the head doctor, who comes from Ghana, treated this emergency patient on Wednesday. People continue to deal with this deadly disease that first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. The photographer said: “It’s inspiring, though, knowing that every single person in the hospitalization ward will survive because they’re receiving medical attention. It’s been some time since I’ve worked with MSF, and I forgot how much I respect the organization and how moved I am by their work.”

An MSF nurse performs an ante-natal consultation for a pregnant woman in one of MSF’s makeshift hospitals in Syria. “Before this war people in Syria had good quality health care,” said MSF surgeon Steve Rubin. “Many Syrians really want that care again. But in this area, other than us, all the other medical facilities are doing war trauma. So they come here because this is their only option.”
Photo by Cathy Janssens/MSF

An MSF nurse performs an ante-natal consultation for a pregnant woman in one of MSF’s makeshift hospitals in Syria. “Before this war people in Syria had good quality health care,” said MSF surgeon Steve Rubin. “Many Syrians really want that care again. But in this area, other than us, all the other medical facilities are doing war trauma. So they come here because this is their only option.”

Photo by Cathy Janssens/MSF

A boy with asthma receives oxygen in the ER section of an MSF hospital in Syria. The dust had aggravated his asthma and he arrived unable to breathe. It was impossible for his parents to find an asthma inhaler in Syria. There are countless people affected by common health problems in Syria, pathologies that would be entirely manageable in normal settings but can quickly become deadly in the midst of a war, when the usual health care options are suddenly no longer available. Diabetes, hypertension, asthma, and maternal health complications are all taking their toll.
Photo by Robin Meldrum/MSF

A boy with asthma receives oxygen in the ER section of an MSF hospital in Syria. The dust had aggravated his asthma and he arrived unable to breathe. It was impossible for his parents to find an asthma inhaler in Syria. There are countless people affected by common health problems in Syria, pathologies that would be entirely manageable in normal settings but can quickly become deadly in the midst of a war, when the usual health care options are suddenly no longer available. Diabetes, hypertension, asthma, and maternal health complications are all taking their toll.

Photo by Robin Meldrum/MSF

In Syria, MSF surgeon Steve Rubin treats a patient in an inflatable operating theatre inside a makeshift hospital that used to be a chicken farm. The inflatable theatre is a good way to create a sterile environment. “We don’t have everything we need,” said Rubin, “but we make it work. You tell yourself ‘I’m going to do the best I can do with what I have, and save as many lives as I can.’”
Photo by Robin Meldrum/MSF

In Syria, MSF surgeon Steve Rubin treats a patient in an inflatable operating theatre inside a makeshift hospital that used to be a chicken farm. The inflatable theatre is a good way to create a sterile environment. “We don’t have everything we need,” said Rubin, “but we make it work. You tell yourself ‘I’m going to do the best I can do with what I have, and save as many lives as I can.’”

Photo by Robin Meldrum/MSF