Posts tagged honduras

Facing an Epidemic of Urban Violence in Honduras

At first glance, the streets of Tegucigalpa seem calm. However, Honduras's homicide rate is the highest in the world. This frightening statistic is largely due to drug trafficking. Most of the cocaine consumed in the United States is transported through this region. Gangs involved in the drug trade extort businesses, terrorize the population, and engage in vicious turf wars.

MSF is providing assistance to vulnerable populations who face extreme levels of violence and lack access to health care.

During a 2010 spike in dengue fever cases in Honduras, MSF launched an emergency intervention in Tegucigalpa. In addition to treating patients, MSF fought the spread of the deadly disease through vector control, killing mosquitoes by home fumigation. 

Honduras 2010 © Juan Carlos Tomasi

During a 2010 spike in dengue fever cases in Honduras, MSF launched an emergency intervention in Tegucigalpa. In addition to treating patients, MSF fought the spread of the deadly disease through vector control, killing mosquitoes by home fumigation.

Honduras 2010 © Juan Carlos Tomasi

1998Hurricane Mitch

MSF assists victims in Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and El Salvador.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Honduras 1998 © Larry Towell

1998
Hurricane Mitch

MSF assists victims in Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and El Salvador.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Honduras 1998 © Larry Towell

1985Conflict in Central America

MSF provides medical care in Honduras to refugees fleeing armed conflicts in El Salvador and Nicaragua.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Honduras 1985 © Jean Gaumy/Magnum

1985
Conflict in Central America

MSF provides medical care in Honduras to refugees fleeing armed conflicts in El Salvador and Nicaragua.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Honduras 1985 © Jean Gaumy/Magnum

Honduras: Dengue Fever

In Honduras, more than 50,000 cases of Dengue Fever have been reported. MSF has set up an emergency ward for children to help local health efforts combat the outbreak. Special attention has also been paid to prevention efforts and education about the disease.

Lucía, five years old, is ready to be discharged. After five days in the hospital, she waits impatiently for the doctor with her packed bag, and says, “I want to go home and play, I want to color and draw.” 

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

Lucía, five years old, is ready to be discharged. After five days in the hospital, she waits impatiently for the doctor with her packed bag, and says, “I want to go home and play, I want to color and draw.”

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

Anthony, who has spent several days hospitalized in San Felipe Hospital, had a relapse after a slight improvement. “I am concerned because his platelets have dropped,” said his father, Victor, who has also stayed with his child day and night. “They rise, they decrease, and so it goes. All we can do is wait.” 

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

Anthony, who has spent several days hospitalized in San Felipe Hospital, had a relapse after a slight improvement. “I am concerned because his platelets have dropped,” said his father, Victor, who has also stayed with his child day and night. “They rise, they decrease, and so it goes. All we can do is wait.”

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

Five-month-old Ithian remained hospitalized for eight days, and was then ready to be discharged. The child’s mother stayed with him at all times. 

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

Five-month-old Ithian remained hospitalized for eight days, and was then ready to be discharged. The child’s mother stayed with him at all times.

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

In hospital, treatment for children includes hydration and rest. There is no vaccine or specific medicine for the virus, so all the MSF medical team can do is to control the symptoms and treat the consequences while waiting for the body to stabilize. 

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

In hospital, treatment for children includes hydration and rest. There is no vaccine or specific medicine for the virus, so all the MSF medical team can do is to control the symptoms and treat the consequences while waiting for the body to stabilize.

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

MSF has set up an emergency ward at the San Felipe Hospital, on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa, where children under15 with symptoms of the disease can be cared for. 

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

MSF has set up an emergency ward at the San Felipe Hospital, on the outskirts of Tegucigalpa, where children under15 with symptoms of the disease can be cared for.

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

"I had come across the previous kind of dengue," said Herminia, whose son was recently admitted to hospital with the disease. "But this is different. This dengue kills." 

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

"I had come across the previous kind of dengue," said Herminia, whose son was recently admitted to hospital with the disease. "But this is different. This dengue kills."

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

MSF is supporting local health services with a three-pronged approach focusing on medical care, vector control, and community education. 

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

MSF is supporting local health services with a three-pronged approach focusing on medical care, vector control, and community education.

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

To ease the overcrowding in Ministry of Health facilities and help prevent more illness, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has launched an emergency intervention in Tegucigalpa, the country’s capital, where the majority of cases have been reported. 

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

To ease the overcrowding in Ministry of Health facilities and help prevent more illness, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has launched an emergency intervention in Tegucigalpa, the country’s capital, where the majority of cases have been reported.

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

In Honduras, cases of the simple form of dengue have significantly increased in 2010 compared to the previous year, with more than 50,000 cases already reported. However, the most alarming feature of this outbreak is the prevalence of hemorrhagic dengue, with more than 1,500 cases reported and 160 deaths—a massive 1,850 percent increase from 2009.
© Juan Carlos Tomasi

In Honduras, cases of the simple form of dengue have significantly increased in 2010 compared to the previous year, with more than 50,000 cases already reported. However, the most alarming feature of this outbreak is the prevalence of hemorrhagic dengue, with more than 1,500 cases reported and 160 deaths—a massive 1,850 percent increase from 2009.

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

Dengue, endemic in Central America, is a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. Symptoms are similar to flu, with headaches, fever, nausea, abdominal pain, and rashes on the skin. Its most severe form, hemorrhagic dengue, causes bleeding and can lead to irreversible shock and subsequent death. 

© Juan Carlos Tomasi

Dengue, endemic in Central America, is a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. Symptoms are similar to flu, with headaches, fever, nausea, abdominal pain, and rashes on the skin. Its most severe form, hemorrhagic dengue, causes bleeding and can lead to irreversible shock and subsequent death.

© Juan Carlos Tomasi