Posts tagged healthcare

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has surgery teams to address medical issues ranging from fistula and other issues of obstetric care to tuberculosis patients and trauma surgery for those injured during wartime, as well as reconstructive surgery, as in our project in Amman, Jordan. "I am a surgeon but I am also a human being, and [I am] affected by what I see in my work," said MSF surgeon Ali Al-Ani of his experience providing care in Amman. ”I feel pain when I am face-to-face with innocent children and older men and women whose lives have been forever changed by man-made conflict. But as a surgeon, I am in a position to treat these vulnerable people, to make them smile and enjoy a sense of independence again. I feel proud that this project has relieved the suffering of so many patients—by reconstructing their injured bodies and helping them to regain functionality—especially as those who are referred here may not be able to afford such care otherwise.” Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has surgery teams to address medical issues ranging from fistula and other issues of obstetric care to tuberculosis patients and trauma surgery for those injured during wartime, as well as reconstructive surgery, as in our project in Amman, Jordan. "I am a surgeon but I am also a human being, and [I am] affected by what I see in my work," said MSF surgeon Ali Al-Ani of his experience providing care in Amman. ”I feel pain when I am face-to-face with innocent children and older men and women whose lives have been forever changed by man-made conflict. But as a surgeon, I am in a position to treat these vulnerable people, to make them smile and enjoy a sense of independence again. I feel proud that this project has relieved the suffering of so many patients—by reconstructing their injured bodies and helping them to regain functionality—especially as those who are referred here may not be able to afford such care otherwise.” Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) strives to treat victims of sexual violence in all of its programs worldwide. Specialized programs for such patients are operated by MSF in more than 120 projects and include both medical and mental health care. Sexual violence affects millions of people, destroying lives and families and damaging communities. It is a medical emergency, the impact of which is compounded in many countries by a dire absence of health care services for the victims. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) strives to treat victims of sexual violence in all of its programs worldwide. Specialized programs for such patients are operated by MSF in more than 120 projects and include both medical and mental health care. Sexual violence affects millions of people, destroying lives and families and damaging communities. It is a medical emergency, the impact of which is compounded in many countries by a dire absence of health care services for the victims. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Many of the places where  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works are societies where it is difficult for women to implement contraception in their relationships and where women are not encouraged or allowed to freely access health care. A woman’s health is often a family business and she needs her husband’s permission to go to the doctor, sometimes even to receive lifesaving treatment. Without a supportive family, getting tested for and taking treatment for HIV/AIDS can be very challenging for women. More than 90 percent of HIV-positive children contract the virus from mother during pregnancy, birth, or breastfeeding. MSF is working to break the transmission chain. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Many of the places where  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works are societies where it is difficult for women to implement contraception in their relationships and where women are not encouraged or allowed to freely access health care. A woman’s health is often a family business and she needs her husband’s permission to go to the doctor, sometimes even to receive lifesaving treatment. Without a supportive family, getting tested for and taking treatment for HIV/AIDS can be very challenging for women. More than 90 percent of HIV-positive children contract the virus from mother during pregnancy, birth, or breastfeeding. MSF is working to break the transmission chain. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) outpatient centers treat malnutrition, drug-resistant tuberculosis, respiratory tract infections, and other medical issues closer to home for many patients. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) outpatient centers treat malnutrition, drug-resistant tuberculosis, respiratory tract infections, and other medical issues closer to home for many patients. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides emergency medical aid in response to armed conflicts, natural disasters, famines, and epidemics. MSF doctors and nurses are often seen treating physical ailments, but for more than 20 years, MSF has also been caring for patients’ mental health. In 1998, MSF formally recognized the need to implement mental health and psychosocial interventions as part of our emergency work. For people who have lived through terrible events, the psychological consequences can be severe. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides emergency medical aid in response to armed conflicts, natural disasters, famines, and epidemics. MSF doctors and nurses are often seen treating physical ailments, but for more than 20 years, MSF has also been caring for patients’ mental health. In 1998, MSF formally recognized the need to implement mental health and psychosocial interventions as part of our emergency work. For people who have lived through terrible events, the psychological consequences can be severe. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

When children suffer from acute malnutrition, their immune systems are so impaired that the risk of death is greatly increased. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), malnutrition is the single greatest threat to the world’s public health, with 178 million malnourished children across the globe. The critical age for malnutrition is from six months – when mothers generally start supplementing breast milk – to 24 months. However, children under five, adolescents, pregnant, or breastfeeding women, the elderly and the chronically ill are also vulnerable. People become malnourished if they are unable to take in enough or fully utilize the food they eat, due to illnesses such as diarrhea or other longstanding illnesses, such as measles, HIV, and tuberculosis. 

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) estimates that only three percent of the 20 million children suffering from severe acute malnutrition receive the lifesaving treatment they need. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.
When children suffer from acute malnutrition, their immune systems are so impaired that the risk of death is greatly increased. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), malnutrition is the single greatest threat to the world’s public health, with 178 million malnourished children across the globe. The critical age for malnutrition is from six months – when mothers generally start supplementing breast milk – to 24 months. However, children under five, adolescents, pregnant, or breastfeeding women, the elderly and the chronically ill are also vulnerable. People become malnourished if they are unable to take in enough or fully utilize the food they eat, due to illnesses such as diarrhea or other longstanding illnesses, such as measles, HIV, and tuberculosis. 
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) estimates that only three percent of the 20 million children suffering from severe acute malnutrition receive the lifesaving treatment they need. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.
While global measles deaths have decreased by 78 percent worldwide in recent years – from 542,000 in 2000 to 122,000 in 2012 (according to the World Health Organization) – measles is still common in many developing countries, particularly in parts of Africa and Asia. A safe and effective vaccine has existed since the 1960s but outbreaks still occur due to ineffective or insufficient immunization programs. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

While global measles deaths have decreased by 78 percent worldwide in recent years – from 542,000 in 2000 to 122,000 in 2012 (according to the World Health Organization) – measles is still common in many developing countries, particularly in parts of Africa and Asia. A safe and effective vaccine has existed since the 1960s but outbreaks still occur due to ineffective or insufficient immunization programs. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Malaria is most common in poor, deprived areas. In many cases, malaria itself is the cause of such poverty: malaria causes havoc on a socioeconomic level as patients are often bedridden and incapable of carrying out normal daily tasks, resulting in burdens on households and health services, and ultimately huge losses to income in malaria-endemic countries. This suffering and loss of life are tragically unnecessary because malaria is largely preventable, detectable, and treatable.

While 90 percent of malaria deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, the disease is present in nearly every tropical area where  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) carries out field programs: from Ethiopia and Sierra Leone to Cambodia and Myanmar. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.
Malaria is most common in poor, deprived areas. In many cases, malaria itself is the cause of such poverty: malaria causes havoc on a socioeconomic level as patients are often bedridden and incapable of carrying out normal daily tasks, resulting in burdens on households and health services, and ultimately huge losses to income in malaria-endemic countries. This suffering and loss of life are tragically unnecessary because malaria is largely preventable, detectable, and treatable.
While 90 percent of malaria deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, the disease is present in nearly every tropical area where  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) carries out field programs: from Ethiopia and Sierra Leone to Cambodia and Myanmar. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.
Photo by Moises Saman/Magnum
Among the first challenges for Syrian refugees in Lebanon is finding shelter in the absence of any organized camps, a task that’s grown more difficult as their numbers continue to grow and tensions rise with local communities and each other. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Moises Saman/Magnum

Among the first challenges for Syrian refugees in Lebanon is finding shelter in the absence of any organized camps, a task that’s grown more difficult as their numbers continue to grow and tensions rise with local communities and each other. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor
During a typically busy morning at MSF’s clinic in Domeez camp, Iraq, a staff member checks a man’s injured hand while another checks a baby’s breathing. At least 58,000 people from Syria have sought safety at the camp. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor

During a typically busy morning at MSF’s clinic in Domeez camp, Iraq, a staff member checks a man’s injured hand while another checks a baby’s breathing. At least 58,000 people from Syria have sought safety at the camp. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor
New families continue to come from Syria to Domeez camp in Iraq, though the resources are stretched to the limit. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev/Noor

New families continue to come from Syria to Domeez camp in Iraq, though the resources are stretched to the limit. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene
During morning rounds at MSF’s surgery facility in Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Alwash consults with a colleague about a patient with eye and leg wounds. Staff have carried out more than 1,300 surgeries on more than 430 patients in Ramtha, many of them for severe, life-threatening injuries. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene

During morning rounds at MSF’s surgery facility in Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Alwash consults with a colleague about a patient with eye and leg wounds. Staff have carried out more than 1,300 surgeries on more than 430 patients in Ramtha, many of them for severe, life-threatening injuries. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene
In Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Ben Gupta plays chess with a 14-year-old boy named Malik who lost one leg and sustained severe injuries to his other extremities when a bomb fell on a wedding party at his family’s home in Syria. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

Photo by Ton Koene

In Ramtha, Jordan, MSF’s Dr. Ben Gupta plays chess with a 14-year-old boy named Malik who lost one leg and sustained severe injuries to his other extremities when a bomb fell on a wedding party at his family’s home in Syria. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.

There is no cure for HIV/AIDS, although treatments are much more successful than they used to be. A combination of drugs, known as anti-retrovirals (ARVs), help combat the virus and enable people to live longer, healthier lives without their immune system rapidly declining. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) HIV/AIDS programs offer HIV testing with pre- and post-test counseling, treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and provision of ARVs for people in the late stages of the disease. Our programs also generally include support of prevention, education, and awareness activities to help people understand how to prevent the spread of the virus. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

There is no cure for HIV/AIDS, although treatments are much more successful than they used to be. A combination of drugs, known as anti-retrovirals (ARVs), help combat the virus and enable people to live longer, healthier lives without their immune system rapidly declining. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) HIV/AIDS programs offer HIV testing with pre- and post-test counseling, treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and provision of ARVs for people in the late stages of the disease. Our programs also generally include support of prevention, education, and awareness activities to help people understand how to prevent the spread of the virus. Go to doctorswithoutborders.org to learn more.

Photo by Ton Koene
Rukaya goes bravely into the operating room for her seventh surgery at MSF’s emergency surgery hospital in Ramtha, Iraq. The 14-year-old lost her legs and her mother in a bomb attack in Syria. “I don’t remember how I got here,” she says. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria. 

Photo by Ton Koene

Rukaya goes bravely into the operating room for her seventh surgery at MSF’s emergency surgery hospital in Ramtha, Iraq. The 14-year-old lost her legs and her mother in a bomb attack in Syria. “I don’t remember how I got here,” she says. See “The Reach of War,” a look at the human face of the conflict in Syria.