Posts tagged guinea

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos
In a storehouse in Guéckédou, teams prepare solidarity kits for the families of people who are ill with or have died from Ebola. Mattresses, sheets, towels, mosquito nets and soap are offered to the community to replace what has been destroyed or burned in the patient’s room to avoid contamination. “Apart from the enormous workload, it is extremely challenging both physically and emotionally for our staff,” said  Dr. Hilde de Clerck, MSF doctor. ”Outreach teams often travel long ways to reach affected communities. Many also know the affected families themselves and are witness to heartbreaking moments when people must be taken from their family or community into the treatment center.”

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos

In a storehouse in Guéckédou, teams prepare solidarity kits for the families of people who are ill with or have died from Ebola. Mattresses, sheets, towels, mosquito nets and soap are offered to the community to replace what has been destroyed or burned in the patient’s room to avoid contamination. “Apart from the enormous workload, it is extremely challenging both physically and emotionally for our staff,” said  Dr. Hilde de Clerck, MSF doctor. ”Outreach teams often travel long ways to reach affected communities. Many also know the affected families themselves and are witness to heartbreaking moments when people must be taken from their family or community into the treatment center.”

Photo by Joffrey Monnier/MSF
Fatou (name changed) is an Ebola survivor. Her family was the first hit by Ebola in Conakry, the capital of Guinea. She spent two weeks inside the MSF Ebola treatment center before coming out cured and immunized. Fatou doesn’t want to have her face shown, as she fears rejection and discrimination. When she went home after isolation, her backyard, usually full of life, was completely empty. No one dared to go fetch water from the common well. Fatou remained cloistered in her home for several days before daring to come out. Thanks to the support of the MSF psychologists, she slowly learned to live again.
“People say, ‘It’s the Ebola backyard’. Nobody dares to come. Even when kids drop a ball in the backyard, no one comes to get it. When I got out, I learnt that my death had been announced in the students’ journal. I called my friends, they didn’t want to believe it was me, they were saying Fatou is dead. Some call me the living dead. People are very afraid of Ebola.” Today, she works for MSF as a health promoter. She welcomes the families who are coming to visit their sick relatives at the treatment center, but she doesn’t tell her own relatives that she works for MSF.

Photo by Joffrey Monnier/MSF

Fatou (name changed) is an Ebola survivor. Her family was the first hit by Ebola in Conakry, the capital of Guinea. She spent two weeks inside the MSF Ebola treatment center before coming out cured and immunized. Fatou doesn’t want to have her face shown, as she fears rejection and discrimination. When she went home after isolation, her backyard, usually full of life, was completely empty. No one dared to go fetch water from the common well. Fatou remained cloistered in her home for several days before daring to come out. Thanks to the support of the MSF psychologists, she slowly learned to live again.

“People say, ‘It’s the Ebola backyard’. Nobody dares to come. Even when kids drop a ball in the backyard, no one comes to get it. When I got out, I learnt that my death had been announced in the students’ journal. I called my friends, they didn’t want to believe it was me, they were saying Fatou is dead. Some call me the living dead. People are very afraid of Ebola.” Today, she works for MSF as a health promoter. She welcomes the families who are coming to visit their sick relatives at the treatment center, but she doesn’t tell her own relatives that she works for MSF.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos
Gloves and boots are left to dry in the treatment area in Guéckédou, Guinea. After being in the the isolation zone, clothing and boots are disinfected with chlorine. If contracted, Ebola is one of the world’s most deadly diseases. It is a highly infectious virus that can kill up to 90 percent of the people who catch it, causing terror among infected communities. Because Ebola is highly contagious, staff treating patients suffering from the disease must wear protective equipment to prevent transmission.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos

Gloves and boots are left to dry in the treatment area in Guéckédou, Guinea. After being in the the isolation zone, clothing and boots are disinfected with chlorine. If contracted, Ebola is one of the world’s most deadly diseases. It is a highly infectious virus that can kill up to 90 percent of the people who catch it, causing terror among infected communities. Because Ebola is highly contagious, staff treating patients suffering from the disease must wear protective equipment to prevent transmission.

Photo by Joffrey Monnier/MSF
Jannette is the first pregnant woman known to have survived Ebola in Guéckédou, Guinea, during the current outbreak. She arrived seven months pregnant with her sixth child at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Ebola treatment center in Guéckédou. Her prognosis was not good. Up until then, no pregnant woman had survived Ebola, but Jannette slowly started to recover.
After a few days her baby stopped moving. Medical staff confirmed the fetus was dead. A blood test showed that Jannette was cured and was testing Ebola-negative, but there was a risk that the baby might have been infected. Luckily, there was an obstetrician in the MSF medical team. She tested the amniotic fluid, and the results showed Ebola-positive. Jannette was cured, but her stillborn baby was still contagious.
Considering the risks of contagion linked to an unprotected delivery, the medical team had no choice but to proceed with the delivery inside the Ebola isolation structure. Jannette survived and went on to make a full recovery. Today she is cured and regularly comes to visit the medical team at the Ebola treatment center. Her village, Houdouni, suffered heavy losses due to the disease. Of the 110 official residents, 23 died of Ebola and only five, including Jannette, survived.

Photo by Joffrey Monnier/MSF

Jannette is the first pregnant woman known to have survived Ebola in Guéckédou, Guinea, during the current outbreak. She arrived seven months pregnant with her sixth child at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Ebola treatment center in Guéckédou. Her prognosis was not good. Up until then, no pregnant woman had survived Ebola, but Jannette slowly started to recover.

After a few days her baby stopped moving. Medical staff confirmed the fetus was dead. A blood test showed that Jannette was cured and was testing Ebola-negative, but there was a risk that the baby might have been infected. Luckily, there was an obstetrician in the MSF medical team. She tested the amniotic fluid, and the results showed Ebola-positive. Jannette was cured, but her stillborn baby was still contagious.

Considering the risks of contagion linked to an unprotected delivery, the medical team had no choice but to proceed with the delivery inside the Ebola isolation structure. Jannette survived and went on to make a full recovery. Today she is cured and regularly comes to visit the medical team at the Ebola treatment center. Her village, Houdouni, suffered heavy losses due to the disease. Of the 110 official residents, 23 died of Ebola and only five, including Jannette, survived.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.
Sia Bintou spent more than 10 days in MSF’s Ebola treatment center in Guéckédou, Guinea. There were many times when the medical team thought she would not make it, but Bintou beat the disease. Here, staff congratulate her as she is discharged. Right now, Ebola patients have been identified in more than 60 locations in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. MSF is the only aid organization treating people affected by the virus.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.

Sia Bintou spent more than 10 days in MSF’s Ebola treatment center in Guéckédou, Guinea. There were many times when the medical team thought she would not make it, but Bintou beat the disease. Here, staff congratulate her as she is discharged. Right now, Ebola patients have been identified in more than 60 locations in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. MSF is the only aid organization treating people affected by the virus.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.
Teams at the treatment center at Donka hospital, in Conakry, Guinea, work through the night and 24/7. Since the outbreak in West Africa began in March, MSF has treated 470 patients—215 of them confirmed cases—in specialized treatment centers in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. The scale of this Ebola epidemic is unprecedented in terms of geographical distribution and the numbers of cases and deaths. There have been 528 cases and 337 deaths since the epidemic began, according to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) figures.

Photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos.

Teams at the treatment center at Donka hospital, in Conakry, Guinea, work through the night and 24/7. Since the outbreak in West Africa began in March, MSF has treated 470 patients—215 of them confirmed cases—in specialized treatment centers in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. The scale of this Ebola epidemic is unprecedented in terms of geographical distribution and the numbers of cases and deaths. There have been 528 cases and 337 deaths since the epidemic began, according to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) figures.

Photo: Jérémie, an MSF community health agent, performs a rapid diagnostic test for malaria on a child with fever. Guinea 2013 © Philippe Latour/MSF
A Community Comes Together to Fight Malaria in Guinea
In Guinea, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has set up a network of community health agents as part of its strategy to tackle malaria. These volunteers are committed to working for the well-being of their communities.
André Millimouno is a builder by trade, but in September 2010 this cheerful 44-year-old gave up his job to become a community health agent in the area MSF supports. He is part of a team of 47 agents who help manage malaria in their communities in Guéckédou, in Guinea’s remote Guinée Forestière region.
This morning, André has come to the village of Kat-Kama, located 15 kilometers [nine miles] from the nearest health post. In the small central square, a crowd of villagers has gathered under a tree. They know that André has come to give them information about malaria, carry out tests, and treat those suffering from the disease. His t-shirt bears a simple message: “Community health agents are committed to fighting malaria.”

Photo: Jérémie, an MSF community health agent, performs a rapid diagnostic test for malaria on a child with fever. Guinea 2013 © Philippe Latour/MSF

A Community Comes Together to Fight Malaria in Guinea

In Guinea, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has set up a network of community health agents as part of its strategy to tackle malaria. These volunteers are committed to working for the well-being of their communities.

André Millimouno is a builder by trade, but in September 2010 this cheerful 44-year-old gave up his job to become a community health agent in the area MSF supports. He is part of a team of 47 agents who help manage malaria in their communities in Guéckédou, in Guinea’s remote Guinée Forestière region.

This morning, André has come to the village of Kat-Kama, located 15 kilometers [nine miles] from the nearest health post. In the small central square, a crowd of villagers has gathered under a tree. They know that André has come to give them information about malaria, carry out tests, and treat those suffering from the disease. His t-shirt bears a simple message: “Community health agents are committed to fighting malaria.”

Fighting A Cholera Outbreak in Guinea and Sierra Leone

A cholera epidemic in the capitals of Guinea and Sierra Leone was declared in February. Our team has treated nearly 8,000 people in the two countries.

Cholera Epidemic Escalates Along Sierra Leone and Guinea Border

The onset of the rainy season in West Africa has caused an increase in cholera cases on both sides of the border between Sierra Leone and Guinea. More than 13,000 people have been admitted to hospitals in the capital cities of Freetown and Conakry since February, when the disease was declared an epidemic. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) currently has more than 800 beds available to treat cholera patients and is opening additional cholera treatment centers and rehydration points in collaboration with local authorities.

Cholera, which spreads through contaminated water and flourishes in unsanitary conditions, causes days of diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps, and leaves patients visibly emaciated after. It is a punishing affliction. “I want to die,” whispers a patient in MSF’s treatment center in the Mabella slum in Freetown, Sierra Leone. “I’m tired, tired of this disease.”Photo: A 10-year-old patient recovers from cholera at Donka Cholera Treatment Center in Conakry, Guinea.

Guinea 2012 © Holly Pickett/MSF

Cholera Epidemic Escalates Along Sierra Leone and Guinea Border

The onset of the rainy season in West Africa has caused an increase in cholera cases on both sides of the border between Sierra Leone and Guinea. More than 13,000 people have been admitted to hospitals in the capital cities of Freetown and Conakry since February, when the disease was declared an epidemic. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) currently has more than 800 beds available to treat cholera patients and is opening additional cholera treatment centers and rehydration points in collaboration with local authorities.

Cholera, which spreads through contaminated water and flourishes in unsanitary conditions, causes days of diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps, and leaves patients visibly emaciated after. It is a punishing affliction. “I want to die,” whispers a patient in MSF’s treatment center in the Mabella slum in Freetown, Sierra Leone. “I’m tired, tired of this disease.

Photo: A 10-year-old patient recovers from cholera at Donka Cholera Treatment Center in Conakry, Guinea.
Guinea 2012 © Holly Pickett/MSF

Vaccinating Against Cholera in Guinea

More than 170,000 people in the Boffa region of Guinea recently became the first in Africa to receive a new two-dose oral vaccine for cholera, said MSF, which led the vaccination campaign.

The initiative, MSF said, could spur an improved response to cholera epidemics worldwide. In collaboration with the Guinean Ministry of Health, MSF focused its response on Boffa, a coastal region near Conakry, which was considered a hotspot of the epidemic.

“We were faced with an outbreak and we wanted first to protect people by vaccinating them, and to limit the spread of cholera,” said Dr. Dominique Legros, MSF’s innovation initiative manager in Geneva. “MSF is regularly involved in responding to cholera outbreaks and it is always difficult to control the disease. Because cholera evolves quickly, oral vaccination provides us with a new tool to try to contain [it]. If we can control the most active spots, we can reduce the spread of cholera.”Photo: An MSF patient takes a dose of the new oral cholera vaccine in Guinea.
Guinea 2012 © David Di Lorenzo

Vaccinating Against Cholera in Guinea

More than 170,000 people in the Boffa region of Guinea recently became the first in Africa to receive a new two-dose oral vaccine for cholera, said MSF, which led the vaccination campaign.

The initiative, MSF said, could spur an improved response to cholera epidemics worldwide. In collaboration with the Guinean Ministry of Health, MSF focused its response on Boffa, a coastal region near Conakry, which was considered a hotspot of the epidemic.

“We were faced with an outbreak and we wanted first to protect people by vaccinating them, and to limit the spread of cholera,” said Dr. Dominique Legros, MSF’s innovation initiative manager in Geneva. “MSF is regularly involved in responding to cholera outbreaks and it is always difficult to control the disease. Because cholera evolves quickly, oral vaccination provides us with a new tool to try to contain [it]. If we can control the most active spots, we can reduce the spread of cholera.

Photo: An MSF patient takes a dose of the new oral cholera vaccine in Guinea. Guinea 2012 © David Di Lorenzo

For First Time in Africa, MSF Responds to Cholera Outbreak in Guinea With Mass Vaccination Campaign

After a cholera epidemic broke out in Guinea,  MSF
began a mass vaccination campaign, the first time the organization has done so in Africa. At present, teams are vaccinating more than 150,000 people in the Boffa region, near the capital of Conakry, using an oral vaccine designed to protect those who take it from contracting the disease. The first two phases of this campaign began on April 18.

“The epidemic in Guinea was declared in February and Boffa Prefecture is currently where we are seeing the largest active outbreak,” said Charles Gaudry, head of mission for MSF in Guinea. “Since the beginning of the epidemic, 152 cases of cholera and six deaths have been reported. We aim to vaccinate around 155,000 people.”Photo: Guinea 2012 © MSF
MSF staff delivering the cholera vaccine in Boffa Prefecture

For First Time in Africa, MSF Responds to Cholera Outbreak in Guinea With Mass Vaccination Campaign

After a cholera epidemic broke out in Guinea, MSF began a mass vaccination campaign, the first time the organization has done so in Africa. At present, teams are vaccinating more than 150,000 people in the Boffa region, near the capital of Conakry, using an oral vaccine designed to protect those who take it from contracting the disease. The first two phases of this campaign began on April 18.

“The epidemic in Guinea was declared in February and Boffa Prefecture is currently where we are seeing the largest active outbreak,” said Charles Gaudry, head of mission for MSF in Guinea. “Since the beginning of the epidemic, 152 cases of cholera and six deaths have been reported. We aim to vaccinate around 155,000 people.”

Photo: Guinea 2012 © MSF
MSF staff delivering the cholera vaccine in Boffa Prefecture