Posts tagged graphic design

“Refugee children are incredibly vulnerable to developing vaccine-preventable diseases, so why do we keep hearing the players in the global vaccination community tell us these kids aren’t their problem?” asked Kate Elder, vaccines policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. Read more

“Refugee children are incredibly vulnerable to developing vaccine-preventable diseases, so why do we keep hearing the players in the global vaccination community tell us these kids aren’t their problem?” asked Kate Elder, vaccines policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. Read more

432,000 routine vaccinations, 78,500 surgeries, 1,642,800 malaria cases treated! Take a look at Doctors Without Borders in 2012 by the numbers.

432,000 routine vaccinations, 78,500 surgeries, 1,642,800 malaria cases treated! Take a look at Doctors Without Borders in 2012 by the numbers.

Bayer Attempting To Block Affordable Patented Drugs In India

German pharmaceutical company Bayer is challenging an intellectual property decision in India that allows more affordable generic drugs to be produced in the interests of public health. You can see the extent of the price differences in this image. 

Learn more about the case. 

Graphic by Will Owen

Bayer Attempting To Block Affordable Patented Drugs In India

German pharmaceutical company Bayer is challenging an intellectual property decision in India that allows more affordable generic drugs to be produced in the interests of public health. You can see the extent of the price differences in this image.

Learn more about the case.

Graphic by Will Owen

Reblog to help us raise awareness of the plight of Sudanese refugees living in appalling conditions in camps in South Sudan. They are falling ill and dying at rates alarmingly above accepted international standards for emergencies. 

Join us next week for a live webcast discussion on the refugee crisis in South Sudan, featuring recently returned emergency field staff. Wednesday, August 29, 8p ET. Register here.

Reblog to help us raise awareness of the plight of Sudanese refugees living in appalling conditions in camps in South Sudan. They are falling ill and dying at rates alarmingly above accepted international standards for emergencies.

Join us next week for a live webcast discussion on the refugee crisis in South Sudan, featuring recently returned emergency field staff. Wednesday, August 29, 8p ET. Register here.

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar. 


Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

“Lives in the Balance,” a report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.
Infographic by Will Owen

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar.

Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

Lives in the Balance,” a report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.

Infographic by Will Owen

You’ll hear using the phrase “treatment is prevention” often this week as we report from the International AIDS Conference, so we thought we would explain what that means. Learn more about the profound implications of this scientific breakthrough.

You’ll hear using the phrase “treatment is prevention” often this week as we report from the International AIDS Conference, so we thought we would explain what that means.
Learn more about the profound implications of this scientific breakthrough.

This week, we’re excited to be sending you updates from the 2012 International AIDS Conference in Washington DC. 

We’re kicking the conference off today with a satellite session on global innovation. This and other events will be webcast live at http://aids2012.msf.org/.

This week, we’re excited to be sending you updates from the 2012 International AIDS Conference in Washington DC.

We’re kicking the conference off today with a satellite session on global innovation. This and other events will be webcast live at http://aids2012.msf.org/.

The International AIDS Conference is the world’s most attended conference on HIV and AIDS. It’s happening next week, July 22 - 27, in Washington, D.C., and more than 40 members of our staff will be there highlighting the models of care, tools, and policies necessary to get the best treatment to the most people. Follow us for updates from the conference!

The International AIDS Conference is the world’s most attended conference on HIV and AIDS. It’s happening next week, July 22 - 27, in Washington, D.C., and more than 40 members of our staff will be there highlighting the models of care, tools, and policies necessary to get the best treatment to the most people.

Follow us for updates from the conference!

Tens of thousands of refugees fleeing fighting in Sudan are continuing to face a full-blown humanitarian crisis, with people dying from a lack of water, adequate medical care, and shelter as they seek refuge in already-overcrowded camps.

Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Sally McMillen/MSF

Tens of thousands of refugees fleeing fighting in Sudan are continuing to face a full-blown humanitarian crisis, with people dying from a lack of water, adequate medical care, and shelter as they seek refuge in already-overcrowded camps.

Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Sally McMillen/MSF

Over the past three years, MSF teams have witnessed a rather astonishing rise in the number of malaria cases in Democratic Republic of Congo. For its part, MSF is now responding to outbreaks in six separate provinces in the east and north of the country, but a wider, more concerted effort is urgently needed to battle this potentially fatal disease that traditionally afflicts the young and the infirm. Learn more.

Infographic by will owen.

Over the past three years, MSF teams have witnessed a rather astonishing rise in the number of malaria cases in Democratic Republic of Congo. For its part, MSF is now responding to outbreaks in six separate provinces in the east and north of the country, but a wider, more concerted effort is urgently needed to battle this potentially fatal disease that traditionally afflicts the young and the infirm. Learn more.

Infographic by will owen.

The Avoidable Crisis of Maternal DeathMSF makes it a priority to provide lifesaving, emergency obstetric care in both acute and chronic humanitarian crises. MSF teams strive to address the five main causes of maternal death: hemorrhage, sepsis, unsafe abortion, hypertensive disorders, and obstructed labour.

	In a conflict or crisis, pregnant women are even more vulnerable because health services have collapsed, are inadequate, or are totally non-existent. But these women need access to quality emergency obstetric care whether they live in a conflict zone, in a refugee camp, or under plastic sheeting after a devastating earthquake.

	In fact, they need the same help that all pregnant women facing a complication need: access to appropriate medical assistance—skilled medical staff, drugs, and equipment—to save their life and the life of their baby.

	Conflict, epidemics, natural disasters, or the complete breakdown of a country’s health system are crises faced by MSF’s millions of patients around the world every day. But a maternal death: that’s the avoidable crisis.

Infographic by Will Owen

The Avoidable Crisis of Maternal Death

MSF makes it a priority to provide lifesaving, emergency obstetric care in both acute and chronic humanitarian crises. MSF teams strive to address the five main causes of maternal death: hemorrhage, sepsis, unsafe abortion, hypertensive disorders, and obstructed labour.

In a conflict or crisis, pregnant women are even more vulnerable because health services have collapsed, are inadequate, or are totally non-existent. But these women need access to quality emergency obstetric care whether they live in a conflict zone, in a refugee camp, or under plastic sheeting after a devastating earthquake.

In fact, they need the same help that all pregnant women facing a complication need: access to appropriate medical assistance—skilled medical staff, drugs, and equipment—to save their life and the life of their baby.

Conflict, epidemics, natural disasters, or the complete breakdown of a country’s health system are crises faced by MSF’s millions of patients around the world every day. But a maternal death: that’s the avoidable crisis.

Infographic by Will Owen

Tuberculosis  (TB) is often thought of as a disease of the past, but an ongoing resurgence makes it very much an issue of the present day and age.

TB is caused by a bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, that the World Health Organization says infects one third of the world’s population. Between 5 and 10 percent of infected people develop the disease and become contagious at some point in their lives. (For those with HIV or AIDS, however, the rate is much higher.)

The disease usually develops in the lungs, although there are extra-pulmonary cases where the bacilli infect other parts of the body, usually the lymph nodes, bones, central nervous system, and cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Major symptoms of TB are: prolonged cough, bloody expectorations, chest pain, and changes in a person’s general health status. Coughing, sneezing, talking, and spitting can all spread the bacilli into the air, where they can remain viable for several hours before being inhaled by another person.Infographic by better-things.co.uk

Tuberculosis  (TB) is often thought of as a disease of the past, but an ongoing resurgence makes it very much an issue of the present day and age.

TB is caused by a bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, that the World Health Organization says infects one third of the world’s population. Between 5 and 10 percent of infected people develop the disease and become contagious at some point in their lives. (For those with HIV or AIDS, however, the rate is much higher.)

The disease usually develops in the lungs, although there are extra-pulmonary cases where the bacilli infect other parts of the body, usually the lymph nodes, bones, central nervous system, and cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Major symptoms of TB are: prolonged cough, bloody expectorations, chest pain, and changes in a person’s general health status. Coughing, sneezing, talking, and spitting can all spread the bacilli into the air, where they can remain viable for several hours before being inhaled by another person.

Infographic by better-things.co.uk

Tuberculosis in 2012

Tuberculosis (TB) is often thought of as a disease of the past, but an ongoing resurgence makes it very much an issue of the present day and age.

New data suggests that the global scope of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is much larger than previously estimated, requiring a concerted international effort to combat this deadlier form of the disease.MSF is calling on governments, international donors, and drug companies to fight the spread of drug-resistant TB with new financing and new efforts to develop effective and affordable diagnostic tools and drugs. Far shorter and less toxic drug regimens are needed, along with currently non-existent formulations for children, and a point-of-care diagnostics test. Regulatory measures need to be enforced to prevent further spread of the disease due to mismanagement by practitioners.Infographic by better-things.co.uk

Tuberculosis in 2012 Tuberculosis (TB) is often thought of as a disease of the past, but an ongoing resurgence makes it very much an issue of the present day and age.

New data suggests that the global scope of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is much larger than previously estimated, requiring a concerted international effort to combat this deadlier form of the disease.

MSF is calling on governments, international donors, and drug companies to fight the spread of drug-resistant TB with new financing and new efforts to develop effective and affordable diagnostic tools and drugs. Far shorter and less toxic drug regimens are needed, along with currently non-existent formulations for children, and a point-of-care diagnostics test. Regulatory measures need to be enforced to prevent further spread of the disease due to mismanagement by practitioners.

Infographic by better-things.co.uk

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar. 


Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

“Lives in the Balance,” a new report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.
Infographic by Will Owen

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar.

Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

Lives in the Balance,” a new report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.

Infographic by Will Owen