Posts tagged gavi

MSF Access: Dear GAVI Campaign
The ‘Decade of Vaccines,’ the global vaccination initiative for the next ten years, is estimated to cost US$57 billion, with more than half going to pay for the vaccines themselves. In 2001, it cost $1.37 to fully vaccinate a child against six diseases. While 11 vaccines are included in today’s vaccines package, the total price has risen to $38.80, largely because two expensive new vaccines – against pneumococcal disease and rotavirus – have been added, which make up three-quarters of that cost. They are only produced by Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), and Merck. Newer vaccines are significantly more expensive: vaccinating a child against measles costs $0.25, while protecting a child against pneumococcal diseases costs, at best, $21.
Help MSF and send GAVI a message on Twitter asking for them to open up their lower prices to non-governmental organisations and humanitarian actors like MSF now.
CLICK HERE TO SEND A TWEET.

MSF Access: Dear GAVI Campaign

The ‘Decade of Vaccines,’ the global vaccination initiative for the next ten years, is estimated to cost US$57 billion, with more than half going to pay for the vaccines themselves. In 2001, it cost $1.37 to fully vaccinate a child against six diseases. While 11 vaccines are included in today’s vaccines package, the total price has risen to $38.80, largely because two expensive new vaccines – against pneumococcal disease and rotavirus – have been added, which make up three-quarters of that cost. They are only produced by Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), and Merck. Newer vaccines are significantly more expensive: vaccinating a child against measles costs $0.25, while protecting a child against pneumococcal diseases costs, at best, $21.

Help MSF and send GAVI a message on Twitter asking for them to open up their lower prices to non-governmental organisations and humanitarian actors like MSF now.

CLICK HERE TO SEND A TWEET.

MSF Access: Dear GAVI Campaign
“Urgent action is needed to address the skyrocketing price to vaccinate a child, which has risen by 2,700 percent over the last decade,” said Dr. Manica Balasegaram, Executive Director of MSF’s Access Campaign. “Countries where we work will lose their donor support to pay for vaccines soon, and will have to decide which killer diseases they can and can’t afford to protect their children against.”
Help MSF, send GAVI a message on Twitter asking for them to open up their lower prices to non-governmental organisations and humanitarian actors like MSF now.
CLICK HERE TO SEND A TWEET.

MSF Access: Dear GAVI Campaign

“Urgent action is needed to address the skyrocketing price to vaccinate a child, which has risen by 2,700 percent over the last decade,” said Dr. Manica Balasegaram, Executive Director of MSF’s Access Campaign. “Countries where we work will lose their donor support to pay for vaccines soon, and will have to decide which killer diseases they can and can’t afford to protect their children against.”

Help MSF, send GAVI a message on Twitter asking for them to open up their lower prices to non-governmental organisations and humanitarian actors like MSF now.

CLICK HERE TO SEND A TWEET.

MSF Access: Dear GAVI Campaign

The GAVI Alliance negotiates price reductions for newer vaccines and, through its donors (such as the UK, the US and Norway), pays for these vaccines to be introduced in developing countries. MSF has requested that GAVI and vaccine manufacturers extend their discounted prices to us and so far, we have been given the run-around. NGOs and humanitarian actors are partners in extending access to vaccination. Particularly in the world’s poorest countries, we help deliver health services, and in some areas, NGOs are the only actors able to access children with vaccines.

Help MSF and send GAVI a message on Twitter asking for them to open up their lower prices to non-governmental organisations and humanitarian actors like MSF now.

CLICK HERE TO SEND A TWEET.

MSF Access: Dear GAVI Campaign
The GAVI Alliance negotiates price reductions for newer vaccines and, through its donors (such as the UK, the US and Norway), pays for these vaccines to be introduced in developing countries. MSF fully supports GAVI’s mission, but is concerned that the prices agreed for vaccines are still too high, and wants GAVI to put more pressure on the pharmaceutical companies to bring prices down further.
Help MSF, send GAVI a message on Twitter asking for them to open up their lower prices to non-governmental organisations and humanitarian actors like MSF now.
CLICK HERE TO SEND A TWEET.

MSF Access: Dear GAVI Campaign

The GAVI Alliance negotiates price reductions for newer vaccines and, through its donors (such as the UK, the US and Norway), pays for these vaccines to be introduced in developing countries. MSF fully supports GAVI’s mission, but is concerned that the prices agreed for vaccines are still too high, and wants GAVI to put more pressure on the pharmaceutical companies to bring prices down further.

Help MSF, send GAVI a message on Twitter asking for them to open up their lower prices to non-governmental organisations and humanitarian actors like MSF now.

CLICK HERE TO SEND A TWEET.

Photo: An MSF staff member vaccinates a child for measles. DRC 2008 © Anna Surinyach

MSF at the GAVI Alliance “Partners’ Forum” Vaccination Conference, Tanzania, December 5–7, 2012
MSF is deeply concerned that the current global vaccination strategy is not paying enough attention to reaching the one in five babies born each year that continue to go without the very basic vaccination package. MSF sees the direct effect of the failures in basic vaccination when massive outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases emerge in places where we work. In 2010 in the Democratic Republic of Congo alone, MSF vaccinated more than four million people for measles in response to outbreaks that would not be happening if routine immunization were working well. The global number of babies not fully vaccinated rose from 19 million in 2010 to 22.4 million in 2012—there’s an urgent need to address this situation.
The approach being taken in the vaccines blueprint being launched for the next ten years—the “Global Vaccine Action Plan” and “Decade of Vaccines”—does not adequately emphasize the need to strengthen basic immunization. Developing vaccines that are better adapted to reach children in remote or unstable locations—vaccines that do not require refrigeration, do not require needles, and that can be given in fewer doses—is not being prioritized enough. Better products are needed to alleviate the growing number of un-immunized children. GAVI should play a role in the development of adapted products, but to date, it has not done so.

Photo: An MSF staff member vaccinates a child for measles. DRC 2008 © Anna Surinyach

MSF at the GAVI Alliance “Partners’ Forum” Vaccination Conference, Tanzania, December 5–7, 2012


MSF is deeply concerned that the current global vaccination strategy is not paying enough attention to reaching the one in five babies born each year that continue to go without the very basic vaccination package. MSF sees the direct effect of the failures in basic vaccination when massive outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases emerge in places where we work. In 2010 in the Democratic Republic of Congo alone, MSF vaccinated more than four million people for measles in response to outbreaks that would not be happening if routine immunization were working well. The global number of babies not fully vaccinated rose from 19 million in 2010 to 22.4 million in 2012—there’s an urgent need to address this situation.

The approach being taken in the vaccines blueprint being launched for the next ten years—the “Global Vaccine Action Plan” and “Decade of Vaccines”—does not adequately emphasize the need to strengthen basic immunization. Developing vaccines that are better adapted to reach children in remote or unstable locations—vaccines that do not require refrigeration, do not require needles, and that can be given in fewer doses—is not being prioritized enough. Better products are needed to alleviate the growing number of un-immunized children. GAVI should play a role in the development of adapted products, but to date, it has not done so.

Photo: Children wait to receive measles vaccinations. DRC 2008 © Anna Surinyach
Vaccines: Ensuring Sustainable Supplies
Over the last few years, new vaccines to fight an increased range of childhood diseases have come to market. These new products come at a time when there is a renewed focus and international commitment to ensure that children in developing countries are also able to benefit from full protection against childhood killer diseases.
But current vaccine supply and procurement practices are limiting countries’ ability to get the vaccines they want and need for their children. This is leading to vaccine shortages both at national and international level that could hamper global efforts to extend immunization to as many children as possible in developing countries.
The GAVI Alliance, a private-public partnership*, finances the introduction of new and underused vaccines in some of the world’s poorest countries. Read more about GAVI and access to vaccines.

Photo: Children wait to receive measles vaccinations. DRC 2008 © Anna Surinyach

Vaccines: Ensuring Sustainable Supplies

Over the last few years, new vaccines to fight an increased range of childhood diseases have come to market. These new products come at a time when there is a renewed focus and international commitment to ensure that children in developing countries are also able to benefit from full protection against childhood killer diseases.

But current vaccine supply and procurement practices are limiting countries’ ability to get the vaccines they want and need for their children. This is leading to vaccine shortages both at national and international level that could hamper global efforts to extend immunization to as many children as possible in developing countries.

The GAVI Alliance, a private-public partnership*, finances the introduction of new and underused vaccines in some of the world’s poorest countries. Read more about GAVI and access to vaccines.

Photo: An MSF staff member vaccinates a child for measles. DRC 2008 © Anna Surinyach
GAVI Needs to Offer Lower Vaccine Prices to Humanitarian Groups
The GAVI Alliance should systematically extend the discounted vaccine prices it obtains from pharmaceutical companies to humanitarian organizations that are often well placed to reach unvaccinated children, MSF said today at the GAVI Partners Forum meeting in Tanzania. Currently, humanitarian groups such as MSF are not able to obtain vaccines at GAVI prices, and are left to negotiate access to vaccines on a cumbersome case-by-case basis.

Photo: An MSF staff member vaccinates a child for measles. DRC 2008 © Anna Surinyach

GAVI Needs to Offer Lower Vaccine Prices to Humanitarian Groups

The GAVI Alliance should systematically extend the discounted vaccine prices it obtains from pharmaceutical companies to humanitarian organizations that are often well placed to reach unvaccinated children, MSF said today at the GAVI Partners Forum meeting in Tanzania. Currently, humanitarian groups such as MSF are not able to obtain vaccines at GAVI prices, and are left to negotiate access to vaccines on a cumbersome case-by-case basis.