Posts tagged emergency

MSF cargo teams prepare supplies to be sent to the Philippines. “Our priority is to address the urgent and immediate medical needs … After that, really it’s everything – shelter, water, food,” said MSF emergency medical coordinator Dr. Natasha Reyes today. Help MSF respond now: http://bit.ly/18m91VR

MSF cargo teams prepare supplies to be sent to the Philippines. “Our priority is to address the urgent and immediate medical needs … After that, really it’s everything – shelter, water, food,” said MSF emergency medical coordinator Dr. Natasha Reyes today. Help MSF respond now: http://bit.ly/18m91VR

Two trucks crammed full of people collide at night in Haiti. There are scores of injured patients; the MSF team comes together to save everyone they can. Read more 
Photo by Emilie Régnier

Two trucks crammed full of people collide at night in Haiti. There are scores of injured patients; the MSF team comes together to save everyone they can. Read more

Photo by Emilie Régnier

It’s just after midnight in Rutshuru. Tomorrow morning Dr. F, the French anesthetist who arrived here with me, and I leave for Goma. Unfortunately the schedule worked out with me on-call at the hospital and I missed tonight’s farewell party. This morning we had a fairly typical day in the OR, doing 12 procedures between 8am and 1pm including performing a skin graft, placing a traction pin in a patient with a fractured femur, draining a few abscesses, debriding a few wounds plus a handful of dressing changes including two children under the age of three with 2nd degree scald burns over roughly 30% of their bodies plus an eight-month-old who had her foot amputated for an infection two days earlier. I also admitted a 16 year old girl from the ER with chronic osteomyelitis [bone infection] who will need a fairly large operation in the next week or so to remove infected dead bone from her tibia. Chronic osteomyelitis in children is rare in the US but fairly common here in the DRC.
David blogs about his busy last day and says farewell to the Democratic Republic of Congo, for now. Send David some thank you notes and comments or questions below his blog.

Syria: Behind the Lines

After two years of conflict, people in Syria are living through a catastrophic humanitarian crisis. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been able to open three hospitals in the north of the country. Medical teams provide emergency and surgical care, as well as primary health care consultations and maternal care. MSF teams have performed more than 1,300 surgical operations and provided 16,000 consultations inside Syria.

24 Hours In Burco Hospital, Part 2: The Maternity Ward

The town of Burco (also written as ‘Burao’), in Somaliland, has the largest public hospital in the area and serves at least 350,000 people.

Last year, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) medical teams joined Ministry of Health staff at this eight-ward hospital to start providing high-quality, free medical services. Now, Somali staff work alongside MSF staff from as far away as China and Denmark so that patients with medical emergencies receive quality health care.

The hospital’s emergency room is the point of entry for many patients. More than 4,500 people were seen there during the first nine months of 2012. This first video in a series of three looks at the emergency room.

Photo: People who have fled shelling are living in precarious conditions without access to medical care. Syria 2012 © MSF
Wounded and Sick Trapped in War-Torn Syrian City
Tens of thousands of people, many of them wounded, are trapped by intense fighting and bombing in Deir Azzour, a city in eastern Syria. MSF called for the evacuation of the injured and sick to safety and for international medical teams be allowed to work in the war-torn city.
An MSF team unofficially visited Deir Azzour governorate in late November to evaluate needs in the isolated, war-ravaged region. It was too dangerous for the team to enter the city of Deir Azzour, home to a reported 600,000 people prior to the conflict. Local residents reported that tens of thousands of people remain trapped in the city, which is shelled and bombed daily. Those remaining are predominantly poor and elderly, unable or unwilling to leave and now extremely vulnerable. Despite support from an organization of Syrian doctors, it is virtually impossible to obtain medical supplies in Deir Azzour.
“Deir Azzour now has just one makeshift hospital with only four doctors working there,” said Patrick Wieland, an MSF coordinator who recently returned from Syria. “The doctors are completely exhausted after six months of working in a combat zone. But they refuse to leave the city and are continuing to treat the wounded around the clock.”
Evacuating patients on stretchers is particularly risky because of aerial bombings and sniper fire.
MSF teams are working in three hospitals in northern and northwestern Syria, in areas controlled by armed opposition groups. MSF provides emergency medical care, including surgery. Since late June 2012, MSF teams have treated more than 2,500 patients and carried out more than 550 surgeries. In Jordan, Lebanon, and Iraq, MSF has been providing medical care to Syrian refugees and its teams are prepared to address additional needs arising from the conflict in Syria

Photo: People who have fled shelling are living in precarious conditions without access to medical care. Syria 2012 © MSF

Wounded and Sick Trapped in War-Torn Syrian City

Tens of thousands of people, many of them wounded, are trapped by intense fighting and bombing in Deir Azzour, a city in eastern Syria. MSF called for the evacuation of the injured and sick to safety and for international medical teams be allowed to work in the war-torn city.

An MSF team unofficially visited Deir Azzour governorate in late November to evaluate needs in the isolated, war-ravaged region. It was too dangerous for the team to enter the city of Deir Azzour, home to a reported 600,000 people prior to the conflict. Local residents reported that tens of thousands of people remain trapped in the city, which is shelled and bombed daily. Those remaining are predominantly poor and elderly, unable or unwilling to leave and now extremely vulnerable. Despite support from an organization of Syrian doctors, it is virtually impossible to obtain medical supplies in Deir Azzour.

“Deir Azzour now has just one makeshift hospital with only four doctors working there,” said Patrick Wieland, an MSF coordinator who recently returned from Syria. “The doctors are completely exhausted after six months of working in a combat zone. But they refuse to leave the city and are continuing to treat the wounded around the clock.”

Evacuating patients on stretchers is particularly risky because of aerial bombings and sniper fire.

MSF teams are working in three hospitals in northern and northwestern Syria, in areas controlled by armed opposition groups. MSF provides emergency medical care, including surgery. Since late June 2012, MSF teams have treated more than 2,500 patients and carried out more than 550 surgeries. In Jordan, Lebanon, and Iraq, MSF has been providing medical care to Syrian refugees and its teams are prepared to address additional needs arising from the conflict in Syria

ALERT: Fall 2012
The latest issue of our Alert newsletter highlights the devastating crises in South Sudan and Syria, conflict-related emergencies that are causing mass casualties and extensive displacement. In both places, our medical teams are doing as much as they can to ease suffering and save lives.

ALERT: Fall 2012

The latest issue of our Alert newsletter highlights the devastating crises in South Sudan and Syria, conflict-related emergencies that are causing mass casualties and extensive displacement. In both places, our medical teams are doing as much as they can to ease suffering and save lives.

Photo: MSF staff measures a child’s height and weight, seeking to determine his level of nutrition.  South Sudan 2012 © John Stanmyer/VII Photo
Eyewitnesses to an EmergencyReport from South Sudan
Though it hasn’t gotten much attention, an immense refugee emergency continues to unfold in South Sudan. In the young country’s Unity and Upper Nile states, roughly 170,000 Sudanese refugees are living in camps that were, for much of the summer, sprawling, muddy tracts of hardship and sickness. The refugees had escaped state-sponsored aerial bombardments in their homelands, but MSF’s epidemiological teams documented mortality rates in some of the camps well above, and in some cases double, the World Health Organization’s emergency threshold for refugee situations.
MSF, which had been working among the refugees in Yida, in Unity state, and in Upper Nile state’s Maban County, rapidly scaled up its response, adding scores of international and national staff , taking on tasks—drilling boreholes for water, for instance—normally outside its purview, and working around huge logistical challenges posed by both South Sudan’s war-torn history and the onset of the rainy season.
“It was the most challenging ten weeks of my life. It’s a tragedy, and it was devastating to be there. We saw such high mortality, so many people dying. But also, being there and seeing MSF’s ability to respond quickly and make changes—to really bring about an improvement in the health and lives of the people in Yida—was really incredible. It was an honor to be there,” says MSF nurse John Johnson.

Photo: MSF staff measures a child’s height and weight, seeking to determine his level of nutrition.  South Sudan 2012 © John Stanmyer/VII Photo

Eyewitnesses to an Emergency
Report from South Sudan

Though it hasn’t gotten much attention, an immense refugee emergency continues to unfold in South Sudan. In the young country’s Unity and Upper Nile states, roughly 170,000 Sudanese refugees are living in camps that were, for much of the summer, sprawling, muddy tracts of hardship and sickness. The refugees had escaped state-sponsored aerial bombardments in their homelands, but MSF’s epidemiological teams documented mortality rates in some of the camps well above, and in some cases double, the World Health Organization’s emergency threshold for refugee situations.

MSF, which had been working among the refugees in Yida, in Unity state, and in Upper Nile state’s Maban County, rapidly scaled up its response, adding scores of international and national staff , taking on tasks—drilling boreholes for water, for instance—normally outside its purview, and working around huge logistical challenges posed by both South Sudan’s war-torn history and the onset of the rainy season.

It was the most challenging ten weeks of my life. It’s a tragedy, and it was devastating to be there. We saw such high mortality, so many people dying. But also, being there and seeing MSF’s ability to respond quickly and make changes—to really bring about an improvement in the health and lives of the people in Yida—was really incredible. It was an honor to be there,” says MSF nurse John Johnson.

There’s always the next emergency; another child who needs help.
Photo:Women gather at a water tap in T3, the temporary transit site for new arrivals near Jamam. South Sudan 2012 © Shannon Jensen
When the Tap Runs Dry
On Thursday, the pumps at the Bamtiko borehole—the main source of water for Jamam refugee camp—had failed. Imran, MSF’s water and sanitation specialist, led his team in a quick emergency response to replenish and treat the water supply. 
“By the time evening came around that first wet day, I was covered in mud, exhausted, hungry, my clothes bleached by spilled chlorine — a day well-lived. I’m looking forward to doing it again,” says Imran. Read more from his blog on ensuring water treatment in South Sudan.

Photo:Women gather at a water tap in T3, the temporary transit site for new arrivals near Jamam. South Sudan 2012 © Shannon Jensen

When the Tap Runs Dry

On Thursday, the pumps at the Bamtiko borehole—the main source of water for Jamam refugee camp—had failed. Imran, MSF’s water and sanitation specialist, led his team in a quick emergency response to replenish and treat the water supply. 

By the time evening came around that first wet day, I was covered in mud, exhausted, hungry, my clothes bleached by spilled chlorine — a day well-lived. I’m looking forward to doing it again,” says Imran. Read more from his blog on ensuring water treatment in South Sudan.

If you missed our Doctors Without Borders South Sudan webcast last night, the full recording is here.

Learn more about the situation in South Sudan.

If you missed our Doctors Without Borders South Sudan webcast last night, the full recording is here.

Learn more about the situation in South Sudan.

Situation Critical: An MSF Frontline Report from the Unfolding Refugee Crisis in South Sudan

Join us on Wednesday at 8pm ET for a live webcast discussion on the refugee crisis in South Sudan, featuring recently returned Doctors Without Borders field staff.

Situation Critical: An MSF Frontline Report from the Unfolding Refugee Crisis in South Sudan

Join us on Wednesday at 8pm ET for a live webcast discussion on the refugee crisis in South Sudan, featuring recently returned Doctors Without Borders field staff.

Reblog to help us raise awareness of the plight of Sudanese refugees living in appalling conditions in camps in South Sudan. They are falling ill and dying at rates alarmingly above accepted international standards for emergencies. 

Join us next week for a live webcast discussion on the refugee crisis in South Sudan, featuring recently returned emergency field staff. Wednesday, August 29, 8p ET. Register here.

Reblog to help us raise awareness of the plight of Sudanese refugees living in appalling conditions in camps in South Sudan. They are falling ill and dying at rates alarmingly above accepted international standards for emergencies.

Join us next week for a live webcast discussion on the refugee crisis in South Sudan, featuring recently returned emergency field staff. Wednesday, August 29, 8p ET. Register here.

"Despite the rain, mud,  the MSF clinic in Batil, South Sudan is always full."


Follow Gregory Vandendaelen @gregvdd, Comms advisor for MSF, currently tweeting from Batil and Doro camps in South Sudan.

"Despite the rain, mud, the MSF clinic in Batil, South Sudan is always full."

Follow Gregory Vandendaelen @gregvdd, Comms advisor for MSF, currently tweeting from Batil and Doro camps in South Sudan.

Health Catastrophe in South Sudan Refugee Camps

Sudanese refugees living in appalling conditions in camps in South Sudan are falling ill and dying at rates alarmingly above accepted international standards for emergencies.