Posts tagged documentary

Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions
10-year-old Nokubegha is battling drug-resistant TB in Swaziland. He is featured in the FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, airing on PBS Tuesday, March 25. See the trailer: http://bit.ly/1d4KLzi 

Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

10-year-old Nokubegha is battling drug-resistant TB in Swaziland. He is featured in the FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, airing on PBS Tuesday, March 25. See the trailer: http://bit.ly/1d4KLzi 

See the new documentary ‘Fire in the Blood’ at IFC Center in New York City through Thursday. An intricate tale of “medicine, monopoly, and malice,” it tells the story of how Western pharmaceutical companies and governments aggressively blocked access to affordable AIDS drugs in Africa and the global south, leading to ten million or more unnecessary deaths. It is also the inspiring story of the improbable group of people who decided to fight back. Get details

See the new documentary ‘Fire in the Blood’ at IFC Center in New York City through Thursday. An intricate tale of “medicine, monopoly, and malice,” it tells the story of how Western pharmaceutical companies and governments aggressively blocked access to affordable AIDS drugs in Africa and the global south, leading to ten million or more unnecessary deaths. It is also the inspiring story of the improbable group of people who decided to fight back. Get details

Fatal Neglect
Chagas: Silent Killer

In Fatal Neglect: The Global Health Revolution’s Forgotten Patients, VII photographers Seamus Murphy, Venetia Dearden, Ron Haviv, and John Stanmeyer document the impact of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, the three deadliest neglected tropical diseases — (visceral leishmaniasis (kala azar), Human African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), and Chagas — and vaccine-preventable diseases.

Fatal Neglect
Multidrug-Resistant TB: No Promises 

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REGISTER NOW to join the live webcast of our conference this week on global health, neglected diseases, and R&D.

People are dying of archaic diseases. Why are we in this situation?

The fact that we need to make an investment in should not scare people. Especially in the times that we’re living in with difficult economic conditions. We have to make governments understand that this is not just an issue of responsibility, but it’s an investment that’s really going to pay off in the future. We can’t continue to keep ourselves in a system that result in people dying all over our planet from preventable causes.

In December 2012, MSF, VII Photo and UNION HZ will release FATAL NEGLECT, a five-part documentary film project, to tell the stories of millions of patients left behind by the global health revolution.
The award-winning photojournalists traveled to Mali, Paraguay, South Sudan, and Tajikistan to capture the stories of frontline health workers trying to fight diseases that affect millions of people and kill hundreds of thousands each year yet garner little attention from drug developers, policy makers, or the mass media.
REGISTER NOW to join the live webcast of our conference this week on global health, neglected diseases, and R&D.

In December 2012, MSF, VII Photo and UNION HZ will release FATAL NEGLECT, a five-part documentary film project, to tell the stories of millions of patients left behind by the global health revolution.

The award-winning photojournalists traveled to Mali, Paraguay, South Sudan, and Tajikistan to capture the stories of frontline health workers trying to fight diseases that affect millions of people and kill hundreds of thousands each year yet garner little attention from drug developers, policy makers, or the mass media.

REGISTER NOW to join the live webcast of our conference this week on global health, neglected diseases, and R&D.

We’re posting the videos to our Emmy-nominated series, “Starved for Attention,” in case you missed it! It was truly an honor to be nominated for new approaches to documentary programming.

In this second installment, “Terrifying Normalcy in Bangladesh,” under-nourished girls grow into under-nourished mothers in southern Bangladesh. Photos by Ron Haviv.

The Doctors Without Borders and VII Photo collaborative series on childhood malnutrition, “Starved for Attention,” has been nominated for a News and Documentary Emmy Award for new approaches to documentary programming.

The joint project is composed of eight short multimedia documentaries, spanning reportage in nine countries. Collectively, they present a multi-faceted perspective of childhood malnutrition, a preventable and treatable condition that nonetheless claims the lives of millions of children every year. The documentaries form the core of a global campaign launched by Doctors Without Borders in 2010, with the goal of achieving key reforms of a global food aid system that has failed to ensure that young, vulnerable children receive foods that actually meet their specific nutritional requirements.

The News and Documentary Emmy Award winners will be announced tonight, October 1, 2012, and we are honored to among the following nominees.

New Approaches to News & Documentary Programming: Documentaries

The Photographer is a graphic novel documenting our clandestine cross-border operation in Afghanistan to assist those stranded without medical care in areas hardest-hit after the Soviet invasion in 1979.

Find this and more books about our work here.

The Photographer is a graphic novel documenting our clandestine cross-border operation in Afghanistan to assist those stranded without medical care in areas hardest-hit after the Soviet invasion in 1979.


Find this and more books about our work here.

Health Catastrophe in South Sudan Refugee Camps

Sudanese refugees living in appalling conditions in camps in South Sudan are falling ill and dying at rates alarmingly above accepted international standards for emergencies.

Phumeza is an XDR-TB patient and a blogger for the TB&ME project. This is her first video blog from her home at a TB patient facility in South Africa. Read Phumeza’s TB&ME blog here.

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patient and TB&ME blogger Athong talks from India about the stigma he faces living with the disease. Read Athong’s TB&ME blog here.

A story from the video vaults of MSF:

Mouna’s Story: An Iraqi Girl Struggles to Walk Again

The final and 5th part of a 5 part series

This video series from 2007 follows Mouna, a young girl who suffered severe injuries in Iraq, learning to walk again on artificial limbs with the help of MSF surgeons and physiotherapists in Amman, Jordan. MSF opened the program in 2006 to provide specialized reconstructive surgery to civilians wounded in the conflict.

Thanks for tuning in to learn about Mouna’s story!

If you missed the other films in the series go here:
Part 1 
Part 2 
Part 3
Part 4


Check out more about MSF’s work in Iraq here.

A story from the video vaults of MSF:

Mouna’s Story: An Iraqi Girl Struggles to Walk Again

Part 3 of a 5 part series

This video series from 2007 follows Mouna, a young girl who suffered severe injuries in Iraq, learning to walk again on artificial limbs with the help of MSF surgeons and physiotherapists in Amman, Jordan. MSF opened the program in 2006 to provide specialized reconstructive surgery to civilians wounded in the conflict.

Tune in tomorrow for part 4 of Mouna’s story.

If you missed the first two go here:
Part 1 
Part 2 


Check out more about MSF’s work in Iraq here.

A story from the video vaults of MSF:

Mouna’s Story: An Iraqi Girl Struggles to Walk Again

Part 2 of a 5 part series

This video series from 2007 follows Mouna, a young girl who suffered severe injuries in Iraq, learning to walk again on artificial limbs with the help of MSF surgeons and physiotherapists in Amman, Jordan. MSF opened the program in 2006 to provide specialized reconstructive surgery to civilians wounded in the conflict.

Tune in tomorrow for part 3 of Mouna’s story.

If you missed part 1 view it here.


Check out more about MSF’s work in Iraq here.