Posts tagged doctorswithoutborders

Wounded Syrians Arrive in Jordan

A specialized Doctors Without Borders surgical team performs operations in a hospital in nearby Amman. Dr. Mohamed, a member of the team, came to Ramtha to determine whether any of the new arrivals were in need of orthopedic surgery. “The wounded people we see here have already received urgent care in Syria,” he says. “They usually have old wounds that date back several weeks or months.”

The refugee camps in Ramtha are more like transit camps, and Syrians generally do not stay very long. Dr. Mohamed visits Ramtha every few days. He gives his telephone number to the wounded patients he sees so that they can contact him when they reach Amman and arrange to be seen.

The wounded all have stories to tell. Twenty-five-year-old X*. lifts his polo shirt to show angry purple-red marks on his back. His arms were also lacerated when he was hit with rubber cables after being arrested while participating in a demonstration in Deraa. He says he was tortured in prison, where he remained for 17 days before he was transferred to Damascus. He was freed en route during an attack by the Free Syrian Army and immediately set out for Jordan.

*Names withheld to protect patient identity.

I am awed by the mothers and fathers who have walked for days, and sometimes weeks, carrying their children to safety, away from the conflict or the famine or the natural disaster that has overtaken them. It is what I think of now when I read the blog by Ruby, the MSF epidemiologist, who has been working in the refugee camps of northern South Sudan. We all just want to look after our families, and to do that people sometimes need help.

I have been home for a while now and am only able to begin to process the experiences, the good and the not so good, of working in South Sudan, and my return from this struggling, fragile country.
Lorna Adams is a Canadian Family Physician, who has recently returned from working for MSF in the world’s newest country, South Sudan. Now back at home in Canada, her blog is being published retrospectively. Read more…
South Sudan: “What We Are Facing Is An Extremely Serious Situation”

About 100,000 refugees fleeing the fighting in the Sudanese state of Blue Nile have taken refuge in Maban County in South Sudan. In the camp of Batil, home to 34,000 people, malnutrition is increasing. More than 1,000 children have been admitted to Doctors Without Borders’ nutritional programs, and the number continues to rise as the humanitarian response struggles to keep up with the needs.

Photo:A child is examined for symptoms of malnutrition at Jamam refugee camp in Upper Nile State.
South Sudan 2012 © Robin Meldrum/MSF

South Sudan: “What We Are Facing Is An Extremely Serious Situation”

About 100,000 refugees fleeing the fighting in the Sudanese state of Blue Nile have taken refuge in Maban County in South Sudan. In the camp of Batil, home to 34,000 people, malnutrition is increasing. More than 1,000 children have been admitted to Doctors Without Borders’ nutritional programs, and the number continues to rise as the humanitarian response struggles to keep up with the needs.

Photo:A child is examined for symptoms of malnutrition at Jamam refugee camp in Upper Nile State.
South Sudan 2012 © Robin Meldrum/MSF

We can’t beat this plague with the same pace of scale-up and the same funding levels as we’ve seen the last three years. We need to speed up scale-up: every day, we need to be putting more people on treatment than the day before, and that means getting into the communities to test and offer people treatment closer to home.

Sharonann Lynch, Doctors Without Borders HIV Policy Advisor

Thank you for following MSF’s presence at the 2012 International AIDS Conference!

For updates throughout the year on MSF’s work on access to essential medicines, follow the MSF Access Campaign at @msf_access, facebook.com/MSFaccess, and msfaccess.org.

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar. 


Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

“Lives in the Balance,” a report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.
Infographic by Will Owen

The Need For Urgent HIV and TB Treatment in Myanmar.

Tens of thousands of people living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in Myanmar are unable to access lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a dire situation exacerbated by the recent cancellation of a new round of funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria.

Lives in the Balance,” a report from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), outlines the situation for people affected by HIV and tuberculosis (TB), with a special focus on multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), in Myanmar today. It calls for urgent funding and assistance to be made available by the international donor community to help Myanmar close the devastating gap between people’s need and people’s access to treatment for HIV and TB.

Infographic by Will Owen

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a trade agreement for which the U.S. is demanding provisions that would roll back public health safeguards. It would allow pharma companies to patent minor modifications of old medicines, potentially keeping prices high indefinitely, and delaying access to more affordable generic medicines for our patients and millions of others.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a trade agreement for which the U.S. is demanding provisions that would roll back public health safeguards. It would allow pharma companies to patent minor modifications of old medicines, potentially keeping prices high indefinitely, and delaying access to more affordable generic medicines for our patients and millions of others.

Earlier this week, we introduced you to Mqondisi, the 17-year-old boy from Zimbabwe who is living with HIV. Today, he marched with MSF to the White House in Washington D.C. calling on pharma and the U.S. government to stop undercutting affordable medicines so that we can scale up HIV treatment and stop the virus.

Earlier this week, we introduced you to Mqondisi, the 17-year-old boy from Zimbabwe who is living with HIV.
Today, he marched with MSF to the White House in Washington D.C.
calling on pharma and the U.S. government to stop undercutting affordable medicines so that we can scale up HIV treatment and stop the virus.

You’ll hear using the phrase “treatment is prevention” often this week as we report from the International AIDS Conference, so we thought we would explain what that means. Learn more about the profound implications of this scientific breakthrough.

You’ll hear using the phrase “treatment is prevention” often this week as we report from the International AIDS Conference, so we thought we would explain what that means.
Learn more about the profound implications of this scientific breakthrough.

This week, we’re excited to be sending you updates from the 2012 International AIDS Conference in Washington DC. 

We’re kicking the conference off today with a satellite session on global innovation. This and other events will be webcast live at http://aids2012.msf.org/.

This week, we’re excited to be sending you updates from the 2012 International AIDS Conference in Washington DC.

We’re kicking the conference off today with a satellite session on global innovation. This and other events will be webcast live at http://aids2012.msf.org/.

But then we hear a message on the radio. Rink, one of our star Water/Sanitation guys has gone up to K18 to check that the water supply can be reactivated. He’s discovered about 100 families that must have arrived in recent days from the border. He asks for medical support and Erna, our top medic that has been here since the start of this refugee crisis, from the initial discovery of weak, exhausted refugees that were beyond medical care to the erection of a clinic at K18 to the transfer of all refugees to T3 and finally Batil, grabs her kit and jumps in a car, cancelling the first day off she’s had in a month.
Ruby Siddiqui is an MSF epidemiologist currently working on the refugee crisis in South Sudan.

Read more about the situation on her blog.
The International AIDS Conference is the world’s most attended conference on HIV and AIDS. It’s happening next week, July 22 - 27, in Washington, D.C., and more than 40 members of our staff will be there highlighting the models of care, tools, and policies necessary to get the best treatment to the most people. Follow us for updates from the conference!

The International AIDS Conference is the world’s most attended conference on HIV and AIDS. It’s happening next week, July 22 - 27, in Washington, D.C., and more than 40 members of our staff will be there highlighting the models of care, tools, and policies necessary to get the best treatment to the most people.

Follow us for updates from the conference!

Fighting in North Kivu Prevents Cholera Treatment

The resumption of fighting in the Rutshuru district of North Kivu Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is preventing people from accessing essential care in the midst of a cholera outbreak, the international medical humanitarian organization MSF said today.

“Some roads are blocked or unsafe and it is difficult for people to access health facilities,” said Mickael Le Paih, MSF head of mission in North Kivu. “There have been significantly less people coming to the hospital.”MSF’s efforts to treat cholera in Rutshuru have been hampered by conflict.
DRC 2012 © Emily Lynch/MSF

Fighting in North Kivu Prevents Cholera Treatment

The resumption of fighting in the Rutshuru district of North Kivu Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is preventing people from accessing essential care in the midst of a cholera outbreak, the international medical humanitarian organization MSF said today.

“Some roads are blocked or unsafe and it is difficult for people to access health facilities,” said Mickael Le Paih, MSF head of mission in North Kivu. “There have been significantly less people coming to the hospital.”

MSF’s efforts to treat cholera in Rutshuru have been hampered by conflict.
DRC 2012 © Emily Lynch/MSF

Tweeting from South Sudan

Follow our communications officer Corinne Baker for the latest on the South Sudan refugee crisis.

As South Sudan marks the first anniversary of its independence on July 9, MSF teams are struggling to save lives in one of the most complicated and challenging refugee crises in its history. Having arrived with stories of violence, some 100,000 Sudanese refugees, many of them ill, have sought sanctuary in camps in Upper Nile State with inadequate resources and harsh living conditions. Here, we take a look at the year that led up to this emergency.Photo: South Sudan © Shannon Jensen

As South Sudan marks the first anniversary of its independence on July 9, MSF teams are struggling to save lives in one of the most complicated and challenging refugee crises in its history. Having arrived with stories of violence, some 100,000 Sudanese refugees, many of them ill, have sought sanctuary in camps in Upper Nile State with inadequate resources and harsh living conditions.

Here, we take a look at the year that led up to this emergency.

Photo: South Sudan © Shannon Jensen

As South Sudan marks the first anniversary of its independence on July 9, MSF teams are struggling to save lives in one of the most complicated and challenging refugee crises in its history. Having arrived with stories of violence, some 100,000 Sudanese refugees, many of them ill, have sought sanctuary in camps in Upper Nile State with inadequate resources and harsh living conditions. Here, we take a look at the year that led up to this emergency.Photo: South Sudan © Shannon Jensen

As South Sudan marks the first anniversary of its independence on July 9, MSF teams are struggling to save lives in one of the most complicated and challenging refugee crises in its history. Having arrived with stories of violence, some 100,000 Sudanese refugees, many of them ill, have sought sanctuary in camps in Upper Nile State with inadequate resources and harsh living conditions.

Here, we take a look at the year that led up to this emergency.

Photo: South Sudan © Shannon Jensen