Posts tagged doctor

Photo by William Daniels
   MSF medical staff treat a man who was hit by an arrow at Mpoko airport camp in Bangui, Central African Republic. Around 100,000 people displaced by violence are sheltering at the camp. MSF has provided medical care to about 1,000 people so far.  Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by William Daniels

MSF medical staff treat a man who was hit by an arrow at Mpoko airport camp in Bangui, Central African Republic. Around 100,000 people displaced by violence are sheltering at the camp. MSF has provided medical care to about 1,000 people so far.  Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Dr. Unni Karunakara started biking the entire length of India, from Srinagar in Kashmir to Thiruvanathapuram in Kerala, in October 2013. The former international president of MSF has now biked more than 3290 miles or 5300 km, having made many stops along the way to talk to medical students about health and humanitarianism. See photos and his blog UnniCycles:https://www.cycleformsf.in/unnicycles/

Dr. Unni Karunakara started biking the entire length of India, from Srinagar in Kashmir to Thiruvanathapuram in Kerala, in October 2013. The former international president of MSF has now biked more than 3290 miles or 5300 km, having made many stops along the way to talk to medical students about health and humanitarianism. See photos and his blog UnniCycles:https://www.cycleformsf.in/unnicycles/

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Patients with leg wounds - most by bullets - lay in traction in a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. MSF is providing care in the only trauma unit in the city and has treated more than 800 patients with bullet and knife wounds since early December. Read more:http://bit.ly/1inqOoZ

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Patients with leg wounds - most by bullets - lay in traction in a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. MSF is providing care in the only trauma unit in the city and has treated more than 800 patients with bullet and knife wounds since early December. Read more:http://bit.ly/1inqOoZ

Photo by Jake Simkin
An MSF medical worker in Juba, South Sudan, treats an injured woman, one of the 40,000 people taking refuge from fighting in that area. Overall, MSF emergency teams are working in Juba, Awerial, and Malakal, providing medical care to more than 110,000 displaced people. Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin

An MSF medical worker in Juba, South Sudan, treats an injured woman, one of the 40,000 people taking refuge from fighting in that area. Overall, MSF emergency teams are working in Juba, Awerial, and Malakal, providing medical care to more than 110,000 displaced people. Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin
A child receives treatment from an MSF doctor in Juba, South Sudan, where tens of thousands of people have taken refuge from fighting in the area. Even before the recent fighting broke out, 80% of all health care and basic services in South Sudan was provided by NGOs and many people had limited access to care. Now, due to the dangerous security conditions for residents and aid groups alike, access to care is even more limited, with potentially grave consequences. Read more:http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin

A child receives treatment from an MSF doctor in Juba, South Sudan, where tens of thousands of people have taken refuge from fighting in the area. Even before the recent fighting broke out, 80% of all health care and basic services in South Sudan was provided by NGOs and many people had limited access to care. Now, due to the dangerous security conditions for residents and aid groups alike, access to care is even more limited, with potentially grave consequences. Read more:http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

From the series MSF in 2013:
“Without donations, we wouldn’t have medications, we wouldn’t have IV solutions, we wouldn’t be able to set up an operating tent within a chicken farm, we couldn’t fly to and from the area of conflict … without donor participation, Doctors Without Borders couldn’t be anywhere.”—Dr. Steve Rubin, Doctors Without Borders surgeon in Syria
An MSF team set up an inflatable hospital on the site of a hospital that was destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Photo © Yann Libessart

From the series MSF in 2013:

“Without donations, we wouldn’t have medications, we wouldn’t have IV solutions, we wouldn’t be able to set up an operating tent within a chicken farm, we couldn’t fly to and from the area of conflict … without donor participation, Doctors Without Borders couldn’t be anywhere.”
—Dr. Steve Rubin, Doctors Without Borders surgeon in Syria

An MSF team set up an inflatable hospital on the site of a hospital that was destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Photo © Yann Libessart

From the series MSF in 2013:
“Traveling from village to village, we hear just one word: measles. People are frightened and hopeless. They’re asking for help.”— Nathalie Gielen, Doctors Without Borders team manager
An MSF doctor examines a child being treated for measles in Province Orientale, DRC. Photo © Tristan Pfund

From the series MSF in 2013:

“Traveling from village to village, we hear just one word: measles. People are frightened and hopeless. They’re asking for help.”
— Nathalie Gielen, Doctors Without Borders team manager

An MSF doctor examines a child being treated for measles in Province Orientale, DRC. Photo © Tristan Pfund

From the series MSF in 2013:
“We sent mobile clinics out to reach people who’d fled into the bush, where terrible conditions and lack of food made malnutrition a huge problem. Even though we were a small team we saved a lot of children’s lives that way.”— Dr. Yolaine Civil, Doctors Without Borders pediatrician in Central African Republic (CAR)MSF staff weigh a baby to check for malnutrition at a mobile clinic near Bossangoa, CAR. Photo © Ton Koene

From the series MSF in 2013:

“We sent mobile clinics out to reach people who’d fled into the bush, where terrible conditions and lack of food made malnutrition a huge problem. Even though we were a small team we saved a lot of children’s lives that way.”
— Dr. Yolaine Civil, Doctors Without Borders pediatrician in Central African Republic (CAR)
MSF staff weigh a baby to check for malnutrition at a mobile clinic near Bossangoa, CAR. Photo © Ton Koene

Photo by Jacob Simkin/MSF
South Sudan: Since fighting erupted in Bor, Jonglei State, people have been fleeing to the town of Awerial, in neighboring Lakes State, seeking safety. The area does not have the capacity to absorb all of the new arrivals, and living conditions are near catastrophic. More medical and humanitarian assistance is urgently needed. See a slideshow: http://bit.ly/1bWgOuq

Photo by Jacob Simkin/MSF

South Sudan: Since fighting erupted in Bor, Jonglei State, people have been fleeing to the town of Awerial, in neighboring Lakes State, seeking safety. The area does not have the capacity to absorb all of the new arrivals, and living conditions are near catastrophic. More medical and humanitarian assistance is urgently needed. See a slideshow: http://bit.ly/1bWgOuq

From the series MSF in 2013:
“At one point, we operated for 40 hours with only one two-hour break. Then we slept for three hours, and operated for another 12 hours after that.”—Dr. John de Csepel, Doctors Without Borders trauma surgeon in SyriaAn MSF surgeon operates on a patient in an inflatable operating theatre set up inside a converted chicken farm in Syria. Photo © Robin Meldrum/MSF

From the series MSF in 2013:

“At one point, we operated for 40 hours with only one two-hour break. Then we slept for three hours, and operated for another 12 hours after that.”
—Dr. John de Csepel, Doctors Without Borders trauma surgeon in Syria
An MSF surgeon operates on a patient in an inflatable operating theatre set up inside a converted chicken farm in Syria. Photo © Robin Meldrum/MSF

From the series MSF in 2013:
“While we are treating an increasing number of patients … many more people cannot even make it to the hospitals … That’s why we want to go beyond our hospital walls and reach out to some of these isolated communities.”—Benoit De Gryse, Doctors Without Borders country representative in AfghanistanA three-year-old boy and his two-year-old sister injured in a bomb explosion were treated in MSF’s emergency room at Boost Hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Photo © Francois Dumont

From the series MSF in 2013:

“While we are treating an increasing number of patients … many more people cannot even make it to the hospitals … That’s why we want to go beyond our hospital walls and reach out to some of these isolated communities.”
—Benoit De Gryse, Doctors Without Borders country representative in Afghanistan
A three-year-old boy and his two-year-old sister injured in a bomb explosion were treated in MSF’s emergency room at Boost Hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Photo © Francois Dumont

From the series MSF in 2013:
“We land in the bush with boxes of medicines, plastic sheeting and two stakes to provide a little shade and we go about our work with just the basics … [treating] people with serious infections, malnourished children, pregnant women with infections, and the list goes on.”—Caroline Scholtes, Doctors Without Borders nurse in South Sudan
MSF nurse Caroline Scholtes examines a baby during an MSF mobile clinic in Dorain, Jonglei State, South Sudan. Photo © Caroline Scholtes/MSF

From the series MSF in 2013:

“We land in the bush with boxes of medicines, plastic sheeting and two stakes to provide a little shade and we go about our work with just the basics … [treating] people with serious infections, malnourished children, pregnant women with infections, and the list goes on.”
—Caroline Scholtes, Doctors Without Borders nurse in South Sudan

MSF nurse Caroline Scholtes examines a baby during an MSF mobile clinic in Dorain, Jonglei State, South Sudan. Photo © Caroline Scholtes/MSF

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen
More than anything, 16-yr-old Shahmosa wants to go back to school and be a “normal” girl again. But she has extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis.  http://bit.ly/1h0VGeI 

Photo by Wendy Marijnissen

More than anything, 16-yr-old Shahmosa wants to go back to school and be a “normal” girl again. But she has extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis.  http://bit.ly/1h0VGeI 

Go to http://bit.ly/18mbxOU and sign up for our monthly e-newsletter! Photo by Peter Casaer

Go to http://bit.ly/18mbxOU and sign up for our monthly e-newsletter! Photo by Peter Casaer

Photo by Lynsey Addario/VII
A woman waits to be transported to the MSF hospital to have her second c-section in Bo, Sierra Leone.
A doctor blogs from the same hospital about a different patient: “She had delivered this baby at home over 36 hours before. The baby was doing well but she had not delivered the placenta and had started hemorrhaging. She had to walk an hour and a half to the nearest clinic to get an ambulance to take her to the hospital. When she arrived she was only semi-conscious, covered in blood, and her hemoglobin was only 3.1.” Read blog- http://msf.me/19GFsSo

Photo by Lynsey Addario/VII

A woman waits to be transported to the MSF hospital to have her second c-section in Bo, Sierra Leone.

A doctor blogs from the same hospital about a different patient: “She had delivered this baby at home over 36 hours before. The baby was doing well but she had not delivered the placenta and had started hemorrhaging. She had to walk an hour and a half to the nearest clinic to get an ambulance to take her to the hospital. When she arrived she was only semi-conscious, covered in blood, and her hemoglobin was only 3.1.” Read blog- http://msf.me/19GFsSo