Posts tagged delivery

"Both babies in breech position were successfully delivered at 3pm in the afternoon in the hospital, and all three are alive today, as well as the mother. Baby one weighed 1900 grams and baby two and three both were 2000 grams. Survival in motherhood is a challenge in this setting and is a key reason for MSF’s work in Chad. Another woman who suffered complications from a spontaneous abortion died last night at our hospital, following a hysterectomy for uncontrollable bleeding."
MSF Doctor, Raghu, blogs about the highs and lows of surviving motherhood in Chad. Please leave your questions and comments for Raghu below his blog post. 

"Both babies in breech position were successfully delivered at 3pm in the afternoon in the hospital, and all three are alive today, as well as the mother. Baby one weighed 1900 grams and baby two and three both were 2000 grams. Survival in motherhood is a challenge in this setting and is a key reason for MSF’s work in Chad. Another woman who suffered complications from a spontaneous abortion died last night at our hospital, following a hysterectomy for uncontrollable bleeding."

MSF Doctor, Raghu, blogs about the highs and lows of surviving motherhood in Chad. Please leave your questions and comments for Raghu below his blog post. 

Photo: Supplies being delivered by boat to a mobile sleeping sickness program MSF ran in DRC’s Bandundu Province in 2011. DRC 2011 © Robin Meldrum/ MSF.
A Conversation with Sophie Delaunay, Executive Director, MSF-USA
What are some priorities for MSF-USA in the coming years?
We want to continue providing a critical amount of resources to the overall MSF movement, providing financial support and supporting human resources with the expertise we can offer, and in areas like communications and advocacy as well. We also want to further strengthen the medical expertise that we provide to operations. This will translate into the development of a new health information system, which will be a very big dossier. We will also continue to provide expertise in areas like antibiotic resistance and neglected tropical diseases. The ultimate goal is to improve the quality of our care and develop therapeutic or preventive approaches that are more adaptive to the needs in the field.

Photo: Supplies being delivered by boat to a mobile sleeping sickness program MSF ran in DRC’s Bandundu Province in 2011. DRC 2011 © Robin Meldrum/ MSF.

A Conversation with Sophie Delaunay, Executive Director, MSF-USA

What are some priorities for MSF-USA in the coming years?

We want to continue providing a critical amount of resources to the overall MSF movement, providing financial support and supporting human resources with the expertise we can offer, and in areas like communications and advocacy as well. We also want to further strengthen the medical expertise that we provide to operations. This will translate into the development of a new health information system, which will be a very big dossier. We will also continue to provide expertise in areas like antibiotic resistance and neglected tropical diseases. The ultimate goal is to improve the quality of our care and develop therapeutic or preventive approaches that are more adaptive to the needs in the field.

Photo: Jeannine Ntunzwenimana holds her newborn baby. Burundi 2012 © Sarah ElliottMSF @ Instagram
Jeannine Ntunzwenimana, 20, was seven months pregnant when her water broke. “This is my second child, my first is three years and six months old. My first pregnancy was by c-section at the MSF hospital. My water broke early, I was very affraid because it was too soon. I went to the nearest health centre at Gitaza. It was one and a half hour walk away. An ambulance from MSF came to pick me up. The health centre called them because they said they weren’t able to help the baby. If MSF was not here, I could’ve died and my baby too. The way they welcome us is very different to other places.” Jeannine named her daughter Fridatienne Itangakubuntu who weighed 1.3 kilos when she was born two weeks ago. MSF has worked in Burundi since 1992. 
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Photo: Jeannine Ntunzwenimana holds her newborn baby. Burundi 2012 © Sarah Elliott

MSF @ Instagram

Jeannine Ntunzwenimana, 20, was seven months pregnant when her water broke. “This is my second child, my first is three years and six months old. My first pregnancy was by c-section at the MSF hospital. My water broke early, I was very affraid because it was too soon. I went to the nearest health centre at Gitaza. It was one and a half hour walk away. An ambulance from MSF came to pick me up. The health centre called them because they said they weren’t able to help the baby. If MSF was not here, I could’ve died and my baby too. The way they welcome us is very different to other places.” Jeannine named her daughter Fridatienne Itangakubuntu who weighed 1.3 kilos when she was born two weeks ago. MSF has worked in Burundi since 1992. 

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So I was looking forward to the free movies on the flight from Kigali and Amsterdam. At midnight, there was a call for a doctor as a woman was in labour…
Angie, an MSF doctor, was on her flight home from Democratic Republic of Congo when she was called into duty. Find out how Angie and a team of good samaritans delivered a baby on board. Please leave your questions and comments from Angie in the comments box below her blog post. 
The baby is cleaned off, examined and wrapped in a towel. Katie, the Australian midwife, brings the baby to the mother’s face so that she can see her while we are finishing the c-section. The mother makes no expression, but tears roll down her face when she sees her healthy baby.
MSF obstetrician-gynecologist, Veronica Ades, tells the story of delivering a baby for a patient who has already lost her first two and how women’s reactions to these traumatic experiences in South Sudan differ so massively from those in the U.S., where Veronica is from.