Posts tagged darfur

photo by Juan-Carlos Tomasi
Darfur: “Every Time You Are Able to Save a Patient it Gives You the Motivation to Save Another Life”
"We received about 34 injured people the first instance of violence, on February 8. The hospital did not have surgical supplies and the MSF medical cargo had not arrived yet. We had one emergency box for the MSF team’s personal use, just in case. We used all of the surgical supplies in that box, including material for dressings and drugs for surgeries. We also used all the drugs in the hospital. The hospital’s doctor and I performed the surgeries, we worked as a team. We also had to carry out a blood transfusion for one of the patients; we did not have a fridge, so it was done immediately. - Read more at http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/news/article.cfm?id=6813&source=ads120000R01

photo by Juan-Carlos Tomasi

Darfur: “Every Time You Are Able to Save a Patient it Gives You the Motivation to Save Another Life”

"We received about 34 injured people the first instance of violence, on February 8. The hospital did not have surgical supplies and the MSF medical cargo had not arrived yet. We had one emergency box for the MSF team’s personal use, just in case. We used all of the surgical supplies in that box, including material for dressings and drugs for surgeries. We also used all the drugs in the hospital. The hospital’s doctor and I performed the surgeries, we worked as a team. We also had to carry out a blood transfusion for one of the patients; we did not have a fridge, so it was done immediately. - Read more at http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/news/article.cfm?id=6813&source=ads120000R01

Photo: Refugees displaced by violence in Darfur have settled in Tissi. Chad 2013 © MSF.
Chad: More than 10,000 Refugees Arrive in Tissi Within a Few Days
Roughly 25,000 refugees and returnees had already been living in and around five villages in southeastern Chad for nearly three months. But starting on April 4, 2013, an additional 10,000 began to arrive, having fled violent clashes in Um Dukhun, Sudan, 10 kilometers [about 6 miles] away from the border. And there’s every indication that more are on their way.
They tell similar stories, of villages attacked and set on fire by armed men on horseback, of neighbors and family members killed, of women and children abandoning all their belongings and taking flight. Fighting resumed between several Arab tribes of North and Central Darfur States a few months ago, but the situation has deteriorated dramatically in recent days.

Photo: Refugees displaced by violence in Darfur have settled in Tissi. Chad 2013 © MSF.

Chad: More than 10,000 Refugees Arrive in Tissi Within a Few Days

Roughly 25,000 refugees and returnees had already been living in and around five villages in southeastern Chad for nearly three months. But starting on April 4, 2013, an additional 10,000 began to arrive, having fled violent clashes in Um Dukhun, Sudan, 10 kilometers [about 6 miles] away from the border. And there’s every indication that more are on their way.

They tell similar stories, of villages attacked and set on fire by armed men on horseback, of neighbors and family members killed, of women and children abandoning all their belongings and taking flight. Fighting resumed between several Arab tribes of North and Central Darfur States a few months ago, but the situation has deteriorated dramatically in recent days.

Photo: A mother and child survey the wreckage of a market destroyed in a bombing attack in North Darfur. Sudan 2009 © Jan-Joseph Stok
Darfur: “After a Decade of Fighting There Are Still Medical Needs”
Tribal clashes over the ownership of a gold mine have already forced nearly 100,000 people from their homes in the Jebel Amir region of Sudan’s North Darfur this year. A decade has passed since the Darfur conflict began, and there are still dire medical needs in the region. Despite efforts to provide medical humanitarian aid to the people of Darfur, there is still more work to do, says Fernando Medina, our MSF head of mission in Sudan.

Photo: A mother and child survey the wreckage of a market destroyed in a bombing attack in North Darfur. Sudan 2009 © Jan-Joseph Stok

Darfur: “After a Decade of Fighting There Are Still Medical Needs”

Tribal clashes over the ownership of a gold mine have already forced nearly 100,000 people from their homes in the Jebel Amir region of Sudan’s North Darfur this year. A decade has passed since the Darfur conflict began, and there are still dire medical needs in the region. Despite efforts to provide medical humanitarian aid to the people of Darfur, there is still more work to do, says Fernando Medina, our MSF head of mission in Sudan.

100,000 People Without Essential Health Care in North DarfurMSF Forced to Suspend Lifesaving Medical Activities After Restrictions Imposed on Its Work

As a result of increasing restrictions imposed by Sudanese authorities, MSF has been forced to suspend most of its medical activities in the Jebel Si region of North Darfur State in Sudan.

Increasing obstacles over the past year led to the suspension of MSF’s activities. No shipments of drugs or medical supplies have been authorized since September 2011, and MSF has encountered growing difficulties obtaining work and travel permits for its staff. Transport options to and from Jebel Si have also been drastically reduced. MSF has been the sole health provider in the region.

“With the reduction of our activities in Jebel Si, more than 100,000 people in the region are left entirely without health care,” said Alberto Cristina, MSF operational manager for Sudan. “If we are not allowed to deliver medicines and supplies to our hospital and health posts soon, disease outbreaks are likely to occur, and maternal and prenatal deaths are likely to increase and may even reach emergency levels.”Photo: Mothers and children at an MSF facility in Jebel Si, where obstacles threaten MSF’s continued operation
Sudan 2012 © MSF

100,000 People Without Essential Health Care in North Darfur

MSF Forced to Suspend Lifesaving Medical Activities After Restrictions Imposed on Its Work

As a result of increasing restrictions imposed by Sudanese authorities, MSF has been forced to suspend most of its medical activities in the Jebel Si region of North Darfur State in Sudan.

Increasing obstacles over the past year led to the suspension of MSF’s activities. No shipments of drugs or medical supplies have been authorized since September 2011, and MSF has encountered growing difficulties obtaining work and travel permits for its staff. Transport options to and from Jebel Si have also been drastically reduced. MSF has been the sole health provider in the region.

“With the reduction of our activities in Jebel Si, more than 100,000 people in the region are left entirely without health care,” said Alberto Cristina, MSF operational manager for Sudan. “If we are not allowed to deliver medicines and supplies to our hospital and health posts soon, disease outbreaks are likely to occur, and maternal and prenatal deaths are likely to increase and may even reach emergency levels.”

Photo: Mothers and children at an MSF facility in Jebel Si, where obstacles threaten MSF’s continued operation

Sudan 2012 © MSF

Somebody Help: The Forgotten Population in North Darfur

In the remote Jebel Si area of North Darfur, MSF runs a hospital, five health posts, and a mobile clinic. These are the only health facilities in the area, and they serve a permanent population of 100,000, as well as about 10,000 seasonal nomads. The majority of MSF’s patients in Jebel Si are women and children.

But now a series of obstacles threaten to seriously hamper MSF’s ability to deliver medical assistance. Vital medical and logistical supplies have been prevented from reaching the area, work permits have not been granted, and physical access to the region has become increasingly difficult.

As a result of these obstacles, MSF has been forced to scale down its activities dramatically. Unless urgent steps are taken to rectify the situation, the people of Jebel Si will be faced with the reality of a future without essential health care.Photo: An MSF staff member checks a child for malnutrition in Jebel Si, where obstacles threaten the continued operation of MSF’s health posts, the only such facilities in the area.
Sudan 2012 © MSF

Somebody Help: The Forgotten Population in North Darfur

In the remote Jebel Si area of North Darfur, MSF runs a hospital, five health posts, and a mobile clinic. These are the only health facilities in the area, and they serve a permanent population of 100,000, as well as about 10,000 seasonal nomads. The majority of MSF’s patients in Jebel Si are women and children.

But now a series of obstacles threaten to seriously hamper MSF’s ability to deliver medical assistance. Vital medical and logistical supplies have been prevented from reaching the area, work permits have not been granted, and physical access to the region has become increasingly difficult.

As a result of these obstacles, MSF has been forced to scale down its activities dramatically. Unless urgent steps are taken to rectify the situation, the people of Jebel Si will be faced with the reality of a future without essential health care.

Photo: An MSF staff member checks a child for malnutrition in Jebel Si, where obstacles threaten the continued operation of MSF’s health posts, the only such facilities in the area.
Sudan 2012 © MSF

With the reduction of our activities in Jebel Si, more than 100,000 people in the region are left entirely without healthcare. If we are not allowed to deliver medicines and supplies to our hospital and health posts soon, disease outbreaks are likely to occur, and maternal and prenatal deaths are likely to increase and may even reach emergency levels.

Alberto Cristina, Doctors Without Borders operational manager for Sudan.

As a result of increasing restrictions imposed by Sudanese authorities, Doctors Without Borders has been forced to suspend most of its medical activities in the Jebel Si region of North Darfur State in Sudan.

2009A Difficult Year in Sudan

MSF launches emergency interventions in the south in response to escalating violence and outbreaks, while, in Darfur, the government expels two sections and four staff members are kidnapped. Some projects are therefore closed, but MSF nonetheless provides nearly 129,000 consultations and support numerous local health centers.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Sudan 2009 © Jenn Warren

2009
A Difficult Year in Sudan

MSF launches emergency interventions in the south in response to escalating violence and outbreaks, while, in Darfur, the government expels two sections and four staff members are kidnapped. Some projects are therefore closed, but MSF nonetheless provides nearly 129,000 consultations and support numerous local health centers.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Sudan 2009 © Jenn Warren

2004Emergency in Darfur, Sudan
MSF starts nutritional programs, water-and-sanitation programs, clinics, and vaccination campaigns in western Sudan and Chad, where hundreds of thousands of people have fled violence targeted against them, in what is to become in 2005 and 2006 one of the largest emergency responses in MSF’s history.

Five MSF Aid Workers Murdered in Afghanistan
Fasil Ahmad, Besmillah, Hélène de Bier, Pim Kwint, and Egil Tynaes are assassinated in Badghis Province. MSF leaves Afghanistan, after providing assistance for 20 years.

MSF Leaves Iraq
With humanitarian aid workers increasingly under attack, MSF decides that the level of risk to its staff is unacceptable and makes the difficult decision to close its medical programs.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Sudan 2004 © MSF/Kris Torgeson

2004
Emergency in Darfur, Sudan
MSF starts nutritional programs, water-and-sanitation programs, clinics, and vaccination campaigns in western Sudan and Chad, where hundreds of thousands of people have fled violence targeted against them, in what is to become in 2005 and 2006 one of the largest emergency responses in MSF’s history.

Five MSF Aid Workers Murdered in Afghanistan
Fasil Ahmad, Besmillah, Hélène de Bier, Pim Kwint, and Egil Tynaes are assassinated in Badghis Province. MSF leaves Afghanistan, after providing assistance for 20 years.

MSF Leaves Iraq
With humanitarian aid workers increasingly under attack, MSF decides that the level of risk to its staff is unacceptable and makes the difficult decision to close its medical programs.

Learn more about MSF’s history at our website.

Photo: Sudan 2004 © MSF/Kris Torgeson

Humanitarian aid agencies organize the distributions of food and non-food items. People waiting in line (mostly women) are exposed to the heat of the desert, which often reaches 50 degrees Celsius (120 Fahrenheit) in the shade. Kalma Camp in Darfur.
Sudan 2007 © Voitek Asztabski / MSF
For the second year in a row, Sudan was included in our “Top 10 Humanitarian Crises” report. Read it here.

Humanitarian aid agencies organize the distributions of food and non-food items. People waiting in line (mostly women) are exposed to the heat of the desert, which often reaches 50 degrees Celsius (120 Fahrenheit) in the shade. Kalma Camp in Darfur.

Sudan 2007 © Voitek Asztabski / MSF

For the second year in a row, Sudan was included in our “Top 10 Humanitarian Crises” report. Read it here.