Posts tagged community

Photo: Jérémie, an MSF community health agent, performs a rapid diagnostic test for malaria on a child with fever. Guinea 2013 © Philippe Latour/MSF
A Community Comes Together to Fight Malaria in Guinea
In Guinea, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has set up a network of community health agents as part of its strategy to tackle malaria. These volunteers are committed to working for the well-being of their communities.
André Millimouno is a builder by trade, but in September 2010 this cheerful 44-year-old gave up his job to become a community health agent in the area MSF supports. He is part of a team of 47 agents who help manage malaria in their communities in Guéckédou, in Guinea’s remote Guinée Forestière region.
This morning, André has come to the village of Kat-Kama, located 15 kilometers [nine miles] from the nearest health post. In the small central square, a crowd of villagers has gathered under a tree. They know that André has come to give them information about malaria, carry out tests, and treat those suffering from the disease. His t-shirt bears a simple message: “Community health agents are committed to fighting malaria.”

Photo: Jérémie, an MSF community health agent, performs a rapid diagnostic test for malaria on a child with fever. Guinea 2013 © Philippe Latour/MSF

A Community Comes Together to Fight Malaria in Guinea

In Guinea, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has set up a network of community health agents as part of its strategy to tackle malaria. These volunteers are committed to working for the well-being of their communities.

André Millimouno is a builder by trade, but in September 2010 this cheerful 44-year-old gave up his job to become a community health agent in the area MSF supports. He is part of a team of 47 agents who help manage malaria in their communities in Guéckédou, in Guinea’s remote Guinée Forestière region.

This morning, André has come to the village of Kat-Kama, located 15 kilometers [nine miles] from the nearest health post. In the small central square, a crowd of villagers has gathered under a tree. They know that André has come to give them information about malaria, carry out tests, and treat those suffering from the disease. His t-shirt bears a simple message: “Community health agents are committed to fighting malaria.”

Voice From the Field: Tackling Haiti’s Cholera Epidemic

Joan Arnan, MSF Head of Mission in Haiti, has been working in Haiti for five months, coordinating MSF’s response to the cholera epidemic that has been sweeping the country since October 2010. Here, Arnan explains the response and discusses the difficulties faced by the Haitian Ministry of Health and its international partners in responding to the epidemic. Failures in the epidemiological surveillance system make it impossible to deploy an adequate response in strategic locations, and the dearth of cholera treatment services in national health facilities—along with the withdrawal of several nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) following a decrease in international funding—are hampering the national response to the epidemic.

An MSF staff member educates outpatients about cholera at Léogâne hospital

Haiti 2011 © Yann Libessart/MSF

Voice From the Field: Tackling Haiti’s Cholera Epidemic

Joan Arnan, MSF Head of Mission in Haiti, has been working in Haiti for five months, coordinating MSF’s response to the cholera epidemic that has been sweeping the country since October 2010. Here, Arnan explains the response and discusses the difficulties faced by the Haitian Ministry of Health and its international partners in responding to the epidemic.

Failures in the epidemiological surveillance system make it impossible to deploy an adequate response in strategic locations, and the dearth of cholera treatment services in national health facilities—along with the withdrawal of several nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) following a decrease in international funding—are hampering the national response to the epidemic. An MSF staff member educates outpatients about cholera at Léogâne hospital

Haiti 2011 © Yann Libessart/MSF

Paraguay: Standing up to Chagas: Slideshow

Chagas is a neglected disease that affects between eight and ten million people, mainly in Latin America. MSF works in Paraguay’s rural Chaco region, going into isolated communities to educate people about the disease and screen them for it. Internationally, MSF fights to improve access to diagnosis and treatment for the disease and advocates for more research and development into its treatment.Photo:Paraguay 2012 © Anna Surinyach/MSF
The first step in fighting Chagas is raising awareness amongst the population. The disease can remain asymptomatic for years, so many infected people do not know they are carrying it. MSF is working with health staff and community leaders throughout Chaco to explain what Chagas is to the population.

Paraguay: Standing up to Chagas: Slideshow

Chagas is a neglected disease that affects between eight and ten million people, mainly in Latin America. MSF works in Paraguay’s rural Chaco region, going into isolated communities to educate people about the disease and screen them for it. Internationally, MSF fights to improve access to diagnosis and treatment for the disease and advocates for more research and development into its treatment.

Photo:Paraguay 2012 © Anna Surinyach/MSF

The first step in fighting Chagas is raising awareness amongst the population. The disease can remain asymptomatic for years, so many infected people do not know they are carrying it. MSF is working with health staff and community leaders throughout Chaco to explain what Chagas is to the population.

MSF Blogs: TB&ME

TB&ME is a collaborative blogging project by patients being treated for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and MSF in locations all around the world. They write about their experiences living with MDR-TB and the treatment that they receive. This treatment can often involve taking upwards of 20 pills a day for 24 months and suffering many painful side effects from the toxic drugs.
TB&ME gives MDR-TB patients an opportunity to tell the world about the issues that affect their lives, about how treatment and services could be improved, and how it feels to have this disease. It also provides an opportunity for patients to tell the world that MDR-TB exists in their own words, that it is a global problem and to share their experiences with others who might be in the same position.Photo: South Africa 2011 © Samantha Reinders
Phumeza, an XDR-TB patient and TB&ME blogger in South Africa

MSF Blogs: TB&ME

TB&ME is a collaborative blogging project by patients being treated for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and MSF in locations all around the world. They write about their experiences living with MDR-TB and the treatment that they receive. This treatment can often involve taking upwards of 20 pills a day for 24 months and suffering many painful side effects from the toxic drugs.

TB&ME gives MDR-TB patients an opportunity to tell the world about the issues that affect their lives, about how treatment and services could be improved, and how it feels to have this disease. It also provides an opportunity for patients to tell the world that MDR-TB exists in their own words, that it is a global problem and to share their experiences with others who might be in the same position.

Photo: South Africa 2011 © Samantha Reinders
Phumeza, an XDR-TB patient and TB&ME blogger in South Africa