Posts tagged cholera

Photo by Nick Owen

Kiden Margaret, 31, is the mother of two-year-old John Mukaya. John started showing signs of cholera – an upset stomach, vomiting, crying, and not wanting to eat, so she brought him to the MSF cholera treatment center in Juba, South Sudan.  “ Cholera is now increasingly affecting many people and killing children especially. Myson was very weak, now we are here and he is put on drip and given oral rehydration solutions. I hope my son will get better. It is the first time my child is being affected and treated for cholera. My other three children are all fine. At home we eat normal food and drink usual water; I do not understand how my child got the cholera’’
Photo by Nick Owen
Kiden Margaret, 31, is the mother of two-year-old John Mukaya. John started showing signs of cholera – an upset stomach, vomiting, crying, and not wanting to eat, so she brought him to the MSF cholera treatment center in Juba, South Sudan.   Cholera is now increasingly affecting many people and killing children especially. Myson was very weak, now we are here and he is put on drip and given oral rehydration solutions. I hope my son will get better. It is the first time my child is being affected and treated for cholera. My other three children are all fine. At home we eat normal food and drink usual water; I do not understand how my child got the cholera’’
Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII PhotoAn MSF nurse treats a patient at MSF’s free cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince on Wednesday. The cholera outbreak that began in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake continues to devastate people’s lives. Funding for treatment of the disease has fallen sharply in the last year, leaving people without care or making them pay for it. MSF treated 23,000 people for cholera in 2012.

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII Photo
An MSF nurse treats a patient at MSF’s free cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince on Wednesday. The cholera outbreak that began in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake continues to devastate people’s lives. Funding for treatment of the disease has fallen sharply in the last year, leaving people without care or making them pay for it. MSF treated 23,000 people for cholera in 2012.

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII PhotoAt MSF’s cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince, the head doctor, who comes from Ghana, treated this emergency patient on Wednesday. People continue to deal with this deadly disease that first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. The photographer said: “It’s inspiring, though, knowing that every single person in the hospitalization ward will survive because they’re receiving medical attention. It’s been some time since I’ve worked with MSF, and I forgot how much I respect the organization and how moved I am by their work.”

Photo by Ashley Gilbertson/VII Photo
At MSF’s cholera treatment clinic in the Carrefour area of Port-au-Prince, the head doctor, who comes from Ghana, treated this emergency patient on Wednesday. People continue to deal with this deadly disease that first appeared in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake. The photographer said: “It’s inspiring, though, knowing that every single person in the hospitalization ward will survive because they’re receiving medical attention. It’s been some time since I’ve worked with MSF, and I forgot how much I respect the organization and how moved I am by their work.”

Photo by Marcus BleasdaleSeven-year-old Imani is treated for cholera in Masisi hospital, supported by MSF in Democratic Republic of Congo. The cholera epidemic started last year in the city of Rubaya and has largely affected mine workers and displaced people who are living without access to clean water and soap. MSF had treated 2,400 people with cholera at the hospital as of June.

Photo by Marcus Bleasdale
Seven-year-old Imani is treated for cholera in Masisi hospital, supported by MSF in Democratic Republic of Congo. The cholera epidemic started last year in the city of Rubaya and has largely affected mine workers and displaced people who are living without access to clean water and soap. MSF had treated 2,400 people with cholera at the hospital as of June.

Photo: A young cholera patient at an MSF facility. Haiti 2012 © Emilie Régnier
Haiti: Deplorable Conditions for Cholera Patients

Photo: A young cholera patient at an MSF facility. Haiti 2012 © Emilie Régnier

Haiti: Deplorable Conditions for Cholera Patients

Photo: People line up for registration at a vaccination site. South Sudan 2013 © Corinne Baker/MSF
Preventing Cholera in South Sudan’s Remote Refugee Camps
MSF teams have completed a preventive cholera vaccination campaign in and around the refugee camps in Maban County, South Sudan. Hoping to prevent the spread of the potentially fatal disease, staff vaccinated 105,000 refugees in four camps and 27,500 other residents of the area.
MSF launched the vaccination campaign with the cooperation of South Sudan’s Ministry of Health as part of a cholera preparedness and prevention plan. While teams have already set up and pre-stocked cholera treatment facilities in the camps, the remoteness of the area and supply challenges mean that a cholera outbreak could be disastrous. That’s what makes the added prevention provided by a vaccination campaign so crucial.
“The key for preventing cholera is to ensure sufficient access to clean drinking water, and to have appropriate sanitation and hygiene facilities,” says Paul Critchley, MSF emergency coordinator in Maban County. “We are currently tackling an escalating hepatitis E outbreak in the camps, so we know that sanitation conditions here are not yet adequate. Hepatitis E is spread in similar ways to cholera, and this reinforces the need to do all we can to prevent cholera breaking out too.”

Photo: People line up for registration at a vaccination site. South Sudan 2013 © Corinne Baker/MSF

Preventing Cholera in South Sudan’s Remote Refugee Camps

MSF teams have completed a preventive cholera vaccination campaign in and around the refugee camps in Maban County, South Sudan. Hoping to prevent the spread of the potentially fatal disease, staff vaccinated 105,000 refugees in four camps and 27,500 other residents of the area.

MSF launched the vaccination campaign with the cooperation of South Sudan’s Ministry of Health as part of a cholera preparedness and prevention plan. While teams have already set up and pre-stocked cholera treatment facilities in the camps, the remoteness of the area and supply challenges mean that a cholera outbreak could be disastrous. That’s what makes the added prevention provided by a vaccination campaign so crucial.

“The key for preventing cholera is to ensure sufficient access to clean drinking water, and to have appropriate sanitation and hygiene facilities,” says Paul Critchley, MSF emergency coordinator in Maban County. “We are currently tackling an escalating hepatitis E outbreak in the camps, so we know that sanitation conditions here are not yet adequate. Hepatitis E is spread in similar ways to cholera, and this reinforces the need to do all we can to prevent cholera breaking out too.”

A Month in Focus: December 2012

Reports on treating TB in Chechnya, fighting Yaws in Congo, working with displaced civilians in DRC and South Sudan, and battling cholera in Haiti in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

Photo: Due to living conditions for earthquake survivors and the general population that help enable the spread of cholera in Haiti, the disease remains a lethal threat two years after the epidemic first appeared in the county. Haiti 2012 © Mathieu Fortoul/MSF
For Haitians, Cholera Remains a Major Public Health Problem
It’s been two years since a cholera epidemic first swept through Haiti, infecting hundreds of thousands of people who’d never before encountered the disease. It was clear that cholera was likely to be a recurring issue in Haiti, but even today, new patients cannot be certain that they will get the treatment they need, and little has been done to improve the environmental conditions that enable the continued spread of the disease.
MSF has treated 12,000 cholera patients in five cholera treatment centers since the beginning of the year. During the recent spike of new cases in May, MSF treated more than 70 percent of the total number of patients registered in Port-au-Prince. 

Photo: Due to living conditions for earthquake survivors and the general population that help enable the spread of cholera in Haiti, the disease remains a lethal threat two years after the epidemic first appeared in the county. Haiti 2012 © Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

For Haitians, Cholera Remains a Major Public Health Problem

It’s been two years since a cholera epidemic first swept through Haiti, infecting hundreds of thousands of people who’d never before encountered the disease. It was clear that cholera was likely to be a recurring issue in Haiti, but even today, new patients cannot be certain that they will get the treatment they need, and little has been done to improve the environmental conditions that enable the continued spread of the disease.

MSF has treated 12,000 cholera patients in five cholera treatment centers since the beginning of the year. During the recent spike of new cases in May, MSF treated more than 70 percent of the total number of patients registered in Port-au-Prince. 

I went to the public hospital, but they told me that they couldn’t treat me and I was sent to an MSF treatment center, where I received care.
Wilsème on receiving aid at MSF’s cholera treatment centers in Haiti.

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In short, it gives us the opportunity to be accountable to the people who make our work possible.

View our 2011 annual report.

Fighting A Cholera Outbreak in Guinea and Sierra Leone

A cholera epidemic in the capitals of Guinea and Sierra Leone was declared in February. Our team has treated nearly 8,000 people in the two countries.

Cholera Epidemic Escalates Along Sierra Leone and Guinea Border

The onset of the rainy season in West Africa has caused an increase in cholera cases on both sides of the border between Sierra Leone and Guinea. More than 13,000 people have been admitted to hospitals in the capital cities of Freetown and Conakry since February, when the disease was declared an epidemic. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) currently has more than 800 beds available to treat cholera patients and is opening additional cholera treatment centers and rehydration points in collaboration with local authorities.

Cholera, which spreads through contaminated water and flourishes in unsanitary conditions, causes days of diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps, and leaves patients visibly emaciated after. It is a punishing affliction. “I want to die,” whispers a patient in MSF’s treatment center in the Mabella slum in Freetown, Sierra Leone. “I’m tired, tired of this disease.”Photo: A 10-year-old patient recovers from cholera at Donka Cholera Treatment Center in Conakry, Guinea.

Guinea 2012 © Holly Pickett/MSF

Cholera Epidemic Escalates Along Sierra Leone and Guinea Border

The onset of the rainy season in West Africa has caused an increase in cholera cases on both sides of the border between Sierra Leone and Guinea. More than 13,000 people have been admitted to hospitals in the capital cities of Freetown and Conakry since February, when the disease was declared an epidemic. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) currently has more than 800 beds available to treat cholera patients and is opening additional cholera treatment centers and rehydration points in collaboration with local authorities.

Cholera, which spreads through contaminated water and flourishes in unsanitary conditions, causes days of diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps, and leaves patients visibly emaciated after. It is a punishing affliction. “I want to die,” whispers a patient in MSF’s treatment center in the Mabella slum in Freetown, Sierra Leone. “I’m tired, tired of this disease.

Photo: A 10-year-old patient recovers from cholera at Donka Cholera Treatment Center in Conakry, Guinea.
Guinea 2012 © Holly Pickett/MSF

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Women and children wait in line to gather water at an MSF-run tap point in Doro camp. Supplying refugees with safe water has been a challenge since they started arriving. Heavy rains have further jeopardizing the supply of clean water and caused widespread flooding in the camps.

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Women and children wait in line to gather water at an MSF-run tap point in Doro camp. Supplying refugees with safe water has been a challenge since they started arriving. Heavy rains have further jeopardizing the supply of clean water and caused widespread flooding in the camps.

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.

Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

Battling Cholera in Freetown, Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone’s capital. Freetown, is currently struggling to contain a cholera outbreak that has affected over 1,500 people and killed at least 17 to date. MSF, in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, is already running three cholera treatment units in the city and has treated more than 500 patients. Because the number of people infected continues to grow, however, MSF plans to open two additional treatment facilities up in the next 10 days.

“We are moving quickly to increase our capacity to handle all the new patients that will arrive,” says Karen Van den Brande, MSF head of mission in Sierra Leone. “Our present cholera treatment facilities are stretched to the limit with patients. The patients that we see are of all ages, so it’s not just children or already weak people that are at risk.”Photo: Cholera patients at Marcauley cholera treatment unit in Freetown, Sierra Leone.
Sierra Leone © Florence Demeulin/MSF

Battling Cholera in Freetown, Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone’s capital. Freetown, is currently struggling to contain a cholera outbreak that has affected over 1,500 people and killed at least 17 to date. MSF, in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, is already running three cholera treatment units in the city and has treated more than 500 patients. Because the number of people infected continues to grow, however, MSF plans to open two additional treatment facilities up in the next 10 days.

“We are moving quickly to increase our capacity to handle all the new patients that will arrive,” says Karen Van den Brande, MSF head of mission in Sierra Leone. “Our present cholera treatment facilities are stretched to the limit with patients. The patients that we see are of all ages, so it’s not just children or already weak people that are at risk.”

Photo: Cholera patients at Marcauley cholera treatment unit in Freetown, Sierra Leone.
Sierra Leone © Florence Demeulin/MSF

Dattchina’s Story: The Only Free Burn Unit In Haiti

A mother brings her young daughter to the only free burn care unit in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, which is run by MSF. Many people displaced by the 2010 earthquake in Haiti are still living in tent settlements, while others have rudimentary housing with no facilities or services. It presents the perfects conditions for fires and domestic burn accidents - the victims of which are most often children.