Posts tagged children

"The experience changed me completely; my innocence died there." Twenty years ago, Rachel Kiddell-Monroe was head of mission in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) during and after the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Here she talks about MSF’s response during the genocide and how the aid response and success in Rwanda should serve as a model for DRC’s North Kivu Province just over the border. 

Today marks 20 years since the Rwandan genocide during which approximately 800,000 people lost their lives. Many MSF staff were among the dead. For the first time MSF is sharing its internal communications during the genocide and its aftermath with the public. These reports depict the struggles and humanitarian dilemmas that the organization faced internally. See MSF’s Speaking Out Case Studies: http://speakingout.msf.org/en/genocide-of-rwandan-tutsi

Today marks 20 years since the Rwandan genocide during which approximately 800,000 people lost their lives. Many MSF staff were among the dead. For the first time MSF is sharing its internal communications during the genocide and its aftermath with the public. These reports depict the struggles and humanitarian dilemmas that the organization faced internally. See MSF’s Speaking Out Case Studies: http://speakingout.msf.org/en/genocide-of-rwandan-tutsi

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF
The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF

The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF
An MSF medical worker measures a displaced child for malnutrition. Muslim communities in many towns in western Central African Republic (CAR) have been attacked in recent weeks and residents have fled. In the town of Carnot, on several occasions, armed men entered the grounds of the city hospital where MSF is working, either in an attempt to kill patients or to attack displaced people living there. The hospital teams had to intervene each time. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF

An MSF medical worker measures a displaced child for malnutrition. Muslim communities in many towns in western Central African Republic (CAR) have been attacked in recent weeks and residents have fled. In the town of Carnot, on several occasions, armed men entered the grounds of the city hospital where MSF is working, either in an attempt to kill patients or to attack displaced people living there. The hospital teams had to intervene each time. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF
Anyone who hides Muslims from the anti-balaka militia is at risk in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). On February 7, an anti-Balaka group entered a house where 86 displaced Muslim men, women, and children were being hidden. Seven men were executed and three people were struck with a machete, including a 12-year-old child. After nearly two hours of very tense negotiations, MSF was able to gather the wounded and those requiring immediate medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF

Anyone who hides Muslims from the anti-balaka militia is at risk in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). On February 7, an anti-Balaka group entered a house where 86 displaced Muslim men, women, and children were being hidden. Seven men were executed and three people were struck with a machete, including a 12-year-old child. After nearly two hours of very tense negotiations, MSF was able to gather the wounded and those requiring immediate medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian
Displaced children take shelter in a church in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). Nearly 1,000 people, most of them Muslim, have been trapped, surrounded, and threatened by armed militias since Feb. 1 in this area of southwestern CAR. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian

Displaced children take shelter in a church in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). Nearly 1,000 people, most of them Muslim, have been trapped, surrounded, and threatened by armed militias since Feb. 1 in this area of southwestern CAR. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Kristine Langelund/MSF
In the Philippines: “I asked children to draw a picture of their community before and after the typhoon, and another as they would like it to be when it has been rebuilt. Then we make the paper into a boat and set it out to sail on the sea with a wish…Where I am from in Brazil, this is something that we do at this time of year, hoping that the New Year will bring good things to everyone.” -Ana Cecilia Weintraub, MSF psychologist Read more: http://bit.ly/1i4GtqB

Photo by Kristine Langelund/MSF

In the Philippines: “I asked children to draw a picture of their community before and after the typhoon, and another as they would like it to be when it has been rebuilt. Then we make the paper into a boat and set it out to sail on the sea with a wish…Where I am from in Brazil, this is something that we do at this time of year, hoping that the New Year will bring good things to everyone.” -Ana Cecilia Weintraub, MSF psychologist 
Read more: http://bit.ly/1i4GtqB

Photo by Wairimu Gitau/MSF
A mother and her four children walked hundreds of miles from Juba, South Sudan, to the Nadapal border with Kenya where they became refugees from the fighting in their home country. In Nadapal, an MSF emergency team referred them to a hospital where they were tested for measles. Read more about the conflict in South Sudan: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Wairimu Gitau/MSF

A mother and her four children walked hundreds of miles from Juba, South Sudan, to the Nadapal border with Kenya where they became refugees from the fighting in their home country. In Nadapal, an MSF emergency team referred them to a hospital where they were tested for measles. Read more about the conflict in South Sudan: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Raphael Piret/MSF
Families displaced by violence in Bangui, Central African Republic, are living under the wings of an abandoned plane in a camp where around 100,000 people have taken refuge. Fighting continues in Bangui - already more than half a million people have been driven from their homes. MSF is providing medical care and vaccinations at several sites in Bangui. 

Photo by Raphael Piret/MSF

Families displaced by violence in Bangui, Central African Republic, are living under the wings of an abandoned plane in a camp where around 100,000 people have taken refuge. Fighting continues in Bangui - already more than half a million people have been driven from their homes. MSF is providing medical care and vaccinations at several sites in Bangui. 

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Years of political and military instability in CAR have left the country in a chronic state of humanitarian crisis, particularly as it pertains to public health. The Ministry of Health has almost no presence outside of Bangui, the capital. There is just one doctor per 55,000 people and one nurse or midwife per 7,000 residents, according the United Nations, and most of those are in the capital. Read more: http://bit.ly/1exTtTP

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Years of political and military instability in CAR have left the country in a chronic state of humanitarian crisis, particularly as it pertains to public health. The Ministry of Health has almost no presence outside of Bangui, the capital. There is just one doctor per 55,000 people and one nurse or midwife per 7,000 residents, according the United Nations, and most of those are in the capital. Read more: http://bit.ly/1exTtTP


“Once we operated for 40 hours straight with only one 2-hour break. Then we slept for 3 hours, and operated for another 12 to 14 hours after that. We started Dec. 23 and finished Dec. 26. We didn’t realize it was Christmas until the day after.” —Dr. John de Csepel, MSF trauma surgeon in Syria. 

If you’d like to send some words of encouragement to our medical and logistics staff working far from home over the holidays, we will include your note in our holiday packages. Visit our message board by Monday: http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/donate/messages/  

“Once we operated for 40 hours straight with only one 2-hour break. Then we slept for 3 hours, and operated for another 12 to 14 hours after that. We started Dec. 23 and finished Dec. 26. We didn’t realize it was Christmas until the day after.” —Dr. John de Csepel, MSF trauma surgeon in Syria.

If you’d like to send some words of encouragement to our medical and logistics staff working far from home over the holidays, we will include your note in our holiday packages. Visit our message board by Monday: http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/donate/messages/  

Go to http://bit.ly/18mbxOU and sign up for our monthly e-newsletter! Photo by Peter Casaer

Go to http://bit.ly/18mbxOU and sign up for our monthly e-newsletter! Photo by Peter Casaer

Photo by Ron Haviv/VII Photo
The new Childhood TB Roadmap could help reverse years of neglect:http://bit.ly/1eWUFT0 

Photo by Ron Haviv/VII Photo

The new Childhood TB Roadmap could help reverse years of neglect:http://bit.ly/1eWUFT0 

"The journey is stunning…with the rains come lush green countryside, spontaneous lakes and beautiful migrating birds. And a hair-raising ride in a narrow boat loaded with all our malaria drugs and kits. The road is somewhere under several feet of water." —An epidemiologist helps fight a dangerous and unexpected malaria outbreak in Chad.

"The journey is stunning…with the rains come lush green countryside, spontaneous lakes and beautiful migrating birds. And a hair-raising ride in a narrow boat loaded with all our malaria drugs and kits. The road is somewhere under several feet of water." —An epidemiologist helps fight a dangerous and unexpected malaria outbreak in Chad.

See the new documentary ‘Fire in the Blood’ at IFC Center in New York City through Thursday. An intricate tale of “medicine, monopoly, and malice,” it tells the story of how Western pharmaceutical companies and governments aggressively blocked access to affordable AIDS drugs in Africa and the global south, leading to ten million or more unnecessary deaths. It is also the inspiring story of the improbable group of people who decided to fight back. Get details

See the new documentary ‘Fire in the Blood’ at IFC Center in New York City through Thursday. An intricate tale of “medicine, monopoly, and malice,” it tells the story of how Western pharmaceutical companies and governments aggressively blocked access to affordable AIDS drugs in Africa and the global south, leading to ten million or more unnecessary deaths. It is also the inspiring story of the improbable group of people who decided to fight back. Get details