Posts tagged child

Join us on Reddit THURSDAY at 2pm EDT/6pm GMT to Ask Us Anything about drug-resistant TB. Kees Keus has managed MSF’s TB project in Swaziland for 4 years and Jezza Neumann directed the new FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, now available at pbs.org/frontline. This AMA is an opportunity to ask anything you want to know about drug-resistant TB. Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

Join us on Reddit THURSDAY at 2pm EDT/6pm GMT to Ask Us Anything about drug-resistant TB. Kees Keus has managed MSF’s TB project in Swaziland for 4 years and Jezza Neumann directed the new FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, now available at pbs.org/frontline. This AMA is an opportunity to ask anything you want to know about drug-resistant TB. Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions
10-year-old Nokubegha is battling drug-resistant TB in Swaziland. He is featured in the FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, airing on PBS Tuesday, March 25. See the trailer: http://bit.ly/1d4KLzi 

Photo © 2014 True Vision Productions

10-year-old Nokubegha is battling drug-resistant TB in Swaziland. He is featured in the FRONTLINE documentary “TB Silent Killer”, airing on PBS Tuesday, March 25. See the trailer: http://bit.ly/1d4KLzi 

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Najibullah (left) waits for a check-up at MSF’s Kunduz Trauma Centre in northern Afghanistan. The father of 11 was shot in the leg when a firefight broke out near the construction site he was working on. The police closed off the surrounding roads and his relatives couldn’t take him to the hospital until the fighting stopped the next morning. When he finally reached a doctor, he had lost a great deal of blood and was in a critical condition. He is one of many Afghans who cannot access emergency medical care because security problems make it to dangerous to travel at night. Injuries like Najibullah’s get much worse; his leg had to be amputated. Women enduring complicated labor suffer excessively, and sometimes die. Families can only keep “death watches” over relatives overnight, hoping they survive until morning, when it might be safer to try to reach a doctor. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Mikhail Galustov

Najibullah (left) waits for a check-up at MSF’s Kunduz Trauma Centre in northern Afghanistan. The father of 11 was shot in the leg when a firefight broke out near the construction site he was working on. The police closed off the surrounding roads and his relatives couldn’t take him to the hospital until the fighting stopped the next morning. When he finally reached a doctor, he had lost a great deal of blood and was in a critical condition. He is one of many Afghans who cannot access emergency medical care because security problems make it to dangerous to travel at night. Injuries like Najibullah’s get much worse; his leg had to be amputated. Women enduring complicated labor suffer excessively, and sometimes die. Families can only keep “death watches” over relatives overnight, hoping they survive until morning, when it might be safer to try to reach a doctor. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo by © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

A woman sits with her week-old child, who was born in this very same mud home where they live in a camp for displaced people on Kabul’s outskirts. The mother says she has been bleeding continually since the birth and still cannot stand. Without skilled medical help, women who deliver at home are at greater risk of illness or death if they face complications. Since the early 2000s, the population of Kabul has grown from three to five million people, with a constant flow of people arriving seeking safety or economic opportunity. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo by © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

A woman sits with her week-old child, who was born in this very same mud home where they live in a camp for displaced people on Kabul’s outskirts. The mother says she has been bleeding continually since the birth and still cannot stand. Without skilled medical help, women who deliver at home are at greater risk of illness or death if they face complications. Since the early 2000s, the population of Kabul has grown from three to five million people, with a constant flow of people arriving seeking safety or economic opportunity. Read more: http://bit.ly/1et7DTh

Photo © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

Chamangul’s mother uses her headscarf to fan away flies as her son Chamangul, 12, lies on a bed at the MSF-supported Ahmad Shah Baba hospital in eastern Kabul. He has the body of a boy half his age, but his head is swollen, wrapped in bandages. His mother brought him to MSF’s mobile clinic in Puli Charki, on Kabul’s outskirts, after being turned away from hospitals in the city. The MSF doctors say he suffers from an aggressive form of sarcoma that went untreated for too long and which has rotted most of his head, an ear and an eye. The doctors say they might have been able to help had they seen him earlier, but all they can do now is ease his pain. His mother is a widow who already lost two children to the same illness and now lives with her seven surviving children in a tent surrounded by other families displaced by violence in their home districts.

Photo © Andrea Bruce/Noor Images

Chamangul’s mother uses her headscarf to fan away flies as her son Chamangul, 12, lies on a bed at the MSF-supported Ahmad Shah Baba hospital in eastern Kabul. He has the body of a boy half his age, but his head is swollen, wrapped in bandages. His mother brought him to MSF’s mobile clinic in Puli Charki, on Kabul’s outskirts, after being turned away from hospitals in the city. The MSF doctors say he suffers from an aggressive form of sarcoma that went untreated for too long and which has rotted most of his head, an ear and an eye. The doctors say they might have been able to help had they seen him earlier, but all they can do now is ease his pain. His mother is a widow who already lost two children to the same illness and now lives with her seven surviving children in a tent surrounded by other families displaced by violence in their home districts.

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi
“Our teams have witnessed the consequences of extreme violence, including bullet wounds, maiming from attacks, and lynchings, which are daily realities in Bangui.” Read an update of MSF’s activities in Central African Republic:http://bit.ly/1ebCM36

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi

“Our teams have witnessed the consequences of extreme violence, including bullet wounds, maiming from attacks, and lynchings, which are daily realities in Bangui.” Read an update of MSF’s activities in Central African Republic:http://bit.ly/1ebCM36

Photo by Haroon Khan/MSF
MSF medical staff tend to a young patient in Karachi, Pakistan. The MSF clinic in Karachi provides basic health care and emergency services, including maternal healthcare, to people living in Machar Colony, a densely populated area that suffers from a lack of sanitation, high pollution, and few affordable health services.

Photo by Haroon Khan/MSF

MSF medical staff tend to a young patient in Karachi, Pakistan. The MSF clinic in Karachi provides basic health care and emergency services, including maternal healthcare, to people living in Machar Colony, a densely populated area that suffers from a lack of sanitation, high pollution, and few affordable health services.

Photo by Phil Moore
An injured child receives medical care from MSF in Juba, South Sudan. Fighting throughout the country over the past three weeks has driven people from their homes and many are now sheltering in overcrowded camps with limited assistance. In Juba, MSF teams are seeing hundreds of people per day with diarrhea, malaria, and respiratory infections. “Highly vulnerable people have just become even more vulnerable,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF’s head of mission in South Sudan. “We don’t know what will happen to the thousands of displaced and wounded people across the country.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Phil Moore

An injured child receives medical care from MSF in Juba, South Sudan. Fighting throughout the country over the past three weeks has driven people from their homes and many are now sheltering in overcrowded camps with limited assistance. In Juba, MSF teams are seeing hundreds of people per day with diarrhea, malaria, and respiratory infections. “Highly vulnerable people have just become even more vulnerable,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF’s head of mission in South Sudan. “We don’t know what will happen to the thousands of displaced and wounded people across the country.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin
A child receives treatment from an MSF doctor in Juba, South Sudan, where tens of thousands of people have taken refuge from fighting in the area. Even before the recent fighting broke out, 80% of all health care and basic services in South Sudan was provided by NGOs and many people had limited access to care. Now, due to the dangerous security conditions for residents and aid groups alike, access to care is even more limited, with potentially grave consequences. Read more:http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

Photo by Jake Simkin

A child receives treatment from an MSF doctor in Juba, South Sudan, where tens of thousands of people have taken refuge from fighting in the area. Even before the recent fighting broke out, 80% of all health care and basic services in South Sudan was provided by NGOs and many people had limited access to care. Now, due to the dangerous security conditions for residents and aid groups alike, access to care is even more limited, with potentially grave consequences. Read more:http://bit.ly/1f8ZPga 

From the series MSF in 2013:
“Traveling from village to village, we hear just one word: measles. People are frightened and hopeless. They’re asking for help.”— Nathalie Gielen, Doctors Without Borders team manager
An MSF doctor examines a child being treated for measles in Province Orientale, DRC. Photo © Tristan Pfund

From the series MSF in 2013:

“Traveling from village to village, we hear just one word: measles. People are frightened and hopeless. They’re asking for help.”
— Nathalie Gielen, Doctors Without Borders team manager

An MSF doctor examines a child being treated for measles in Province Orientale, DRC. Photo © Tristan Pfund

From the series MSF in 2013:
“We sent mobile clinics out to reach people who’d fled into the bush, where terrible conditions and lack of food made malnutrition a huge problem. Even though we were a small team we saved a lot of children’s lives that way.”— Dr. Yolaine Civil, Doctors Without Borders pediatrician in Central African Republic (CAR)MSF staff weigh a baby to check for malnutrition at a mobile clinic near Bossangoa, CAR. Photo © Ton Koene

From the series MSF in 2013:

“We sent mobile clinics out to reach people who’d fled into the bush, where terrible conditions and lack of food made malnutrition a huge problem. Even though we were a small team we saved a lot of children’s lives that way.”
— Dr. Yolaine Civil, Doctors Without Borders pediatrician in Central African Republic (CAR)
MSF staff weigh a baby to check for malnutrition at a mobile clinic near Bossangoa, CAR. Photo © Ton Koene

Photo by Jacob Simkin/MSF
South Sudan: Since fighting erupted in Bor, Jonglei State, people have been fleeing to the town of Awerial, in neighboring Lakes State, seeking safety. The area does not have the capacity to absorb all of the new arrivals, and living conditions are near catastrophic. More medical and humanitarian assistance is urgently needed. See a slideshow: http://bit.ly/1bWgOuq

Photo by Jacob Simkin/MSF

South Sudan: Since fighting erupted in Bor, Jonglei State, people have been fleeing to the town of Awerial, in neighboring Lakes State, seeking safety. The area does not have the capacity to absorb all of the new arrivals, and living conditions are near catastrophic. More medical and humanitarian assistance is urgently needed. See a slideshow: http://bit.ly/1bWgOuq

From the series MSF in 2013:
“While we are treating an increasing number of patients … many more people cannot even make it to the hospitals … That’s why we want to go beyond our hospital walls and reach out to some of these isolated communities.”—Benoit De Gryse, Doctors Without Borders country representative in AfghanistanA three-year-old boy and his two-year-old sister injured in a bomb explosion were treated in MSF’s emergency room at Boost Hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Photo © Francois Dumont

From the series MSF in 2013:

“While we are treating an increasing number of patients … many more people cannot even make it to the hospitals … That’s why we want to go beyond our hospital walls and reach out to some of these isolated communities.”
—Benoit De Gryse, Doctors Without Borders country representative in Afghanistan
A three-year-old boy and his two-year-old sister injured in a bomb explosion were treated in MSF’s emergency room at Boost Hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Photo © Francois Dumont

From the series MSF in 2013:
“We land in the bush with boxes of medicines, plastic sheeting and two stakes to provide a little shade and we go about our work with just the basics … [treating] people with serious infections, malnourished children, pregnant women with infections, and the list goes on.”—Caroline Scholtes, Doctors Without Borders nurse in South Sudan
MSF nurse Caroline Scholtes examines a baby during an MSF mobile clinic in Dorain, Jonglei State, South Sudan. Photo © Caroline Scholtes/MSF

From the series MSF in 2013:

“We land in the bush with boxes of medicines, plastic sheeting and two stakes to provide a little shade and we go about our work with just the basics … [treating] people with serious infections, malnourished children, pregnant women with infections, and the list goes on.”
—Caroline Scholtes, Doctors Without Borders nurse in South Sudan

MSF nurse Caroline Scholtes examines a baby during an MSF mobile clinic in Dorain, Jonglei State, South Sudan. Photo © Caroline Scholtes/MSF

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Roughly one in 10 people in Central African Republic (CAR) have been driven from their homes by violence that has overwhelmed the country since a coup in March 2013. "We are extremely concerned about the living conditions of the displaced,” said Sylvain Groulx, MSF head of mission in CAR, “who are overcrowded in churches, mosques, or schools, or living in the bush with no access to health care, food, or water, and are threatened by epidemics. Much more needs to be done and it needs to be done now."

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Roughly one in 10 people in Central African Republic (CAR) have been driven from their homes by violence that has overwhelmed the country since a coup in March 2013. "We are extremely concerned about the living conditions of the displaced,” said Sylvain Groulx, MSF head of mission in CAR, “who are overcrowded in churches, mosques, or schools, or living in the bush with no access to health care, food, or water, and are threatened by epidemics. Much more needs to be done and it needs to be done now."