Posts tagged central african republic

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
Children who were vaccinated as part of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s campaign wait on the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Central African Republic.  MSF is providing around 3,600 to 4,600 consultations per month, of which one third are children under five.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

Children who were vaccinated as part of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s campaign wait on the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Central African Republic.  MSF is providing around 3,600 to 4,600 consultations per month, of which one third are children under five.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
A child, vaccinated as part of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR), reaches out to the camera.  In April, more than 3,000 consultations were provided, of which 1,340 were related to malaria.  In early August, the teams saw about 700 children per week, one third of whom were admitted for malaria.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

A child, vaccinated as part of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR), reaches out to the camera.  In April, more than 3,000 consultations were provided, of which 1,340 were related to malaria.  In early August, the teams saw about 700 children per week, one third of whom were admitted for malaria.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
A mother and child on the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Bangui, Central African Republic, proceed to be vaccinated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), while in the background displaced people line up for an initial assessment.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

A mother and child on the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Bangui, Central African Republic, proceed to be vaccinated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), while in the background displaced people line up for an initial assessment.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
On the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Central African Republic, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) vaccinated 482 children, from 0 to 59 months, on Saturday, July 26, 2014. Depending on age, children received the pentavalent vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, polio) and a vaccination against measles, yellow fever and pneumonia.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

On the grounds of the Grand Mosque, Central African Republic, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) vaccinated 482 children, from 0 to 59 months, on Saturday, July 26, 2014. Depending on age, children received the pentavalent vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, polio) and a vaccination against measles, yellow fever and pneumonia.

Photos by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has established a 24/7 ambulance service that continues to provide emergency transportation and transfers to the hospital for all patients at the health center at Mamadou M’Baiki, in PK5.  

Photos by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has established a 24/7 ambulance service that continues to provide emergency transportation and transfers to the hospital for all patients at the health center at Mamadou M’Baiki, in PK5.  

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
In April 2014, Seleka men attacked and robbed this woman and her stepdaughter. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides medical and psychological care to victims of sexual violence in the general hospital of Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR). Activities began on July 5th 2014, and in nearly a month, the team had already dealt with 75 patients; women, men and children.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

In April 2014, Seleka men attacked and robbed this woman and her stepdaughter. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides medical and psychological care to victims of sexual violence in the general hospital of Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR). Activities began on July 5th 2014, and in nearly a month, the team had already dealt with 75 patients; women, men and children.

Aurelie Baumel/MSF
On Saturday, July 26th, 2014, the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) team carries out a vaccination campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, in the Central African Republic, in the district of PK5, where thousands of displaced people are gathered. Many are afraid to travel to the Mamadou M’Baïki health center for treatment.

Aurelie Baumel/MSF

On Saturday, July 26th, 2014, the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) team carries out a vaccination campaign on the grounds of the Grand Mosque in Bangui, in the Central African Republic, in the district of PK5, where thousands of displaced people are gathered. Many are afraid to travel to the Mamadou M’Baïki health center for treatment.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF
At the health center at Mamadou M’Baiki, in PK5, the Primary Health Care project was initiated in early January 2014. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has worked in the Central African Republic since 1997 and currently has more than 300 international staff and more than 2,000 Central African workers in the country. MSF treats children aged 0-15 and provides free medication for children and adults.

Photo by Aurelie Baumel/MSF

At the health center at Mamadou M’Baiki, in PK5, the Primary Health Care project was initiated in early January 2014. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has worked in the Central African Republic since 1997 and currently has more than 300 international staff and more than 2,000 Central African workers in the country. MSF treats children aged 0-15 and provides free medication for children and adults.

Photo by Daniel Barney
Adamou Mohamadou, 30, and his son, Mohamad Nour, seven, are from Zawa, Central African Republic (CAR). “We’ve been here in Gbiti [Cameroon] for a month,” said  Adamou. “His mother is still in Gbiti with our three other children. We left CAR because of an attack on Zawa. We walked for three months. My son was only drinking milk so when the cows died, he did not have anything to eat. I don’t know what will happen next - we are waiting for the Cameroonian government to decide what our fate will be.” Between December 2013 and January 2014, several hundred thousand people fled abuse and violence in CAR, many seeking refuge in Chad and Cameroon. The Chadian government’s decision in May to close its border and the inadequate humanitarian aid offered in Cameroon impede Central Africans from seeking refuge in neighboring countries.

Photo by Daniel Barney

Adamou Mohamadou, 30, and his son, Mohamad Nour, seven, are from Zawa, Central African Republic (CAR). “We’ve been here in Gbiti [Cameroon] for a month,” said  Adamou. “His mother is still in Gbiti with our three other children. We left CAR because of an attack on Zawa. We walked for three months. My son was only drinking milk so when the cows died, he did not have anything to eat. I don’t know what will happen next - we are waiting for the Cameroonian government to decide what our fate will be.” Between December 2013 and January 2014, several hundred thousand people fled abuse and violence in CAR, many seeking refuge in Chad and Cameroon. The Chadian government’s decision in May to close its border and the inadequate humanitarian aid offered in Cameroon impede Central Africans from seeking refuge in neighboring countries.

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF
Alima is 25 years old and from Berberati city in Central African Republic (CAR), where more than half a million people are internally displaced and around 140,000 have taken refuge in border countries due to horrific ongoing fighting. Alima hid for several days at her neighbor’s home before seeking refuge in a church. She was stabbed as she was entering the car which was going to transport her. She never saw her attacker. She made it to Garoua-Boulaï in Cameroon. Her family fled to northern Cameroon, but Alima couldn’t follow and is now on her own.  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) supports the hospital there. In one week, the team provided over 900 medical consultations.   

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF

Alima is 25 years old and from Berberati city in Central African Republic (CAR), where more than half a million people are internally displaced and around 140,000 have taken refuge in border countries due to horrific ongoing fighting. Alima hid for several days at her neighbor’s home before seeking refuge in a church. She was stabbed as she was entering the car which was going to transport her. She never saw her attacker. She made it to Garoua-Boulaï in Cameroon. Her family fled to northern Cameroon, but Alima couldn’t follow and is now on her own.  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) supports the hospital there. In one week, the team provided over 900 medical consultations.   

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF
Refugees from Central African Republic (CAR) wait in Garoua-Boulaï, Cameroon, to be transferred to transit camps in Mbogorné. They are registered with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) but haven’t received any shelter, food or water. Between December 2013 and January 2014, several hundred thousand people fled abuse and violence in CAR, seeking refuge in Chad and Cameroon. After several months of displacement, the Central Africans who have reached Cameroon arrived exhausted and traumatized. Their health status is alarming, particularly in terms of nutrition, with nearly half of the children suffering from malnutrition. Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF

Refugees from Central African Republic (CAR) wait in Garoua-Boulaï, Cameroon, to be transferred to transit camps in Mbogorné. They are registered with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) but haven’t received any shelter, food or water. Between December 2013 and January 2014, several hundred thousand people fled abuse and violence in CAR, seeking refuge in Chad and Cameroon. After several months of displacement, the Central Africans who have reached Cameroon arrived exhausted and traumatized. Their health status is alarming, particularly in terms of nutrition, with nearly half of the children suffering from malnutrition. Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by MSF
Tens of thousands of people have fled violence targeting Fulani and Muslim communities in northern Central African Republic (CAR) and sought refuge in southern Chad. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)  has set up two programs in Sido and Bitoye, both in Chad, to provide emergency medical care and basic non-food items. The Chadian government’s decision in May to close its border with CAR, and the inadequate humanitarian aid deployed in Cameroon, impede Central Africans from seeking refuge in neighboring countries. In June, MSF teams recorded more than 1,700 new arrivals in Sido. They included people arriving from CAR or from other transit camps in Chad who had come to join the family members from whom they had been separated. Some had to pay to cross or walk for hours to find easier crossing points. Others came under fire. Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by MSF

Tens of thousands of people have fled violence targeting Fulani and Muslim communities in northern Central African Republic (CAR) and sought refuge in southern Chad. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)  has set up two programs in Sido and Bitoye, both in Chad, to provide emergency medical care and basic non-food items. The Chadian government’s decision in May to close its border with CAR, and the inadequate humanitarian aid deployed in Cameroon, impede Central Africans from seeking refuge in neighboring countries. In June, MSF teams recorded more than 1,700 new arrivals in Sido. They included people arriving from CAR or from other transit camps in Chad who had come to join the family members from whom they had been separated. Some had to pay to cross or walk for hours to find easier crossing points. Others came under fire. Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
Patients await consultation at a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) clinic in M’Poko camp near Bangui airport in the capital of Central African Republic (CAR). Today, nearly the entire Muslim population in the western half of CAR has left in just a few months. Several enclaves under the protection of armed international forces in Bangui, Carnot, Boda, and Berberati still shelter a few thousand Muslims, but their living conditions are precarious and they have few prospects. Now confined in ghettos, this portion of the Central African population still faces daily threats. Most people believe it is too dangerous to go to the hospital or move around town. While the hospital remains functional, there is little access to it, and MSF has referred 14 emergency cases by airplane and ambulance to hospitals in Bangui and Bria. Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

Patients await consultation at a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) clinic in M’Poko camp near Bangui airport in the capital of Central African Republic (CAR). Today, nearly the entire Muslim population in the western half of CAR has left in just a few months. Several enclaves under the protection of armed international forces in Bangui, Carnot, Boda, and Berberati still shelter a few thousand Muslims, but their living conditions are precarious and they have few prospects. Now confined in ghettos, this portion of the Central African population still faces daily threats. Most people believe it is too dangerous to go to the hospital or move around town. While the hospital remains functional, there is little access to it, and MSF has referred 14 emergency cases by airplane and ambulance to hospitals in Bangui and Bria. Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF
A refugee girl waits to have her bandages changed in a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) tent in Garoua-Boulaï District Hospital in Cameroon. Her family fled the violence in their village on a truck transporting wood. Several were wounded when the truck got into an accident. The refugees were referred to the Cameroon hospital from the MSF hospital in Bouar, Central African Republic (CAR), when the situation became too unstable in the area. Nearly 85 percent of those who died in CAR before any attempt to flee were men (1,863). However, the violence did not spare women, children, or the elderly. There were 209 children under 15 and 227 people over the age of 60 who died because of violence. Survey data and the statements collected by MSF teams in CAR, Chad (where refugees have also sought safety), and Cameroon highlight the breadth of the violence that the populations have experienced — both inside CAR and as they fled the country. Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF

A refugee girl waits to have her bandages changed in a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) tent in Garoua-Boulaï District Hospital in Cameroon. Her family fled the violence in their village on a truck transporting wood. Several were wounded when the truck got into an accident. The refugees were referred to the Cameroon hospital from the MSF hospital in Bouar, Central African Republic (CAR), when the situation became too unstable in the area. Nearly 85 percent of those who died in CAR before any attempt to flee were men (1,863). However, the violence did not spare women, children, or the elderly. There were 209 children under 15 and 227 people over the age of 60 who died because of violence. Survey data and the statements collected by MSF teams in CAR, Chad (where refugees have also sought safety), and Cameroon highlight the breadth of the violence that the populations have experienced — both inside CAR and as they fled the country. Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF
In a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) tent in Garoua-Boulaï District Hospital in Cameroon, MSF nurse Gervais changes the bandages of a patient transferred from the MSF hospital in Bouar, Central African Republic (CAR). MSF supports the hospital in Garoua-Boulaï: in one week, the team provided more than 900 medical consultations. Between December 2013 and January 2014, several hundred thousand people fled abuse and violence in CAR, seeking refuge in Chad and Cameroon. After several months of displacement, the Central Africans who reach Cameroon arrive exhausted and traumatized. Their health status is alarming, particularly in terms of nutrition, with nearly half of the children suffering from malnutrition. “There are still massive deficits in the distribution of aid to the hundreds of thousands who managed to escape the violence and reach Chad or Cameroon,” said Dr. Mego Terzian, MSF’s international president. “The bare minimum that can be done for this population that has suffered incredible violence, lost family members, and been uprooted from their homes, is to provide them with humanitarian assistance.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF

In a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) tent in Garoua-Boulaï District Hospital in Cameroon, MSF nurse Gervais changes the bandages of a patient transferred from the MSF hospital in Bouar, Central African Republic (CAR). MSF supports the hospital in Garoua-Boulaï: in one week, the team provided more than 900 medical consultations. Between December 2013 and January 2014, several hundred thousand people fled abuse and violence in CAR, seeking refuge in Chad and Cameroon. After several months of displacement, the Central Africans who reach Cameroon arrive exhausted and traumatized. Their health status is alarming, particularly in terms of nutrition, with nearly half of the children suffering from malnutrition. “There are still massive deficits in the distribution of aid to the hundreds of thousands who managed to escape the violence and reach Chad or Cameroon,” said Dr. Mego Terzian, MSF’s international president. “The bare minimum that can be done for this population that has suffered incredible violence, lost family members, and been uprooted from their homes, is to provide them with humanitarian assistance.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2