Posts tagged central african republic

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF
In a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) tent in Garoua-Boulaï District Hospital in Cameroon, MSF nurse Gervais changes the bandages of a patient transferred from the MSF hospital in Bouar, Central African Republic (CAR). MSF supports the hospital in Garoua-Boulaï: in one week, the team provided more than 900 medical consultations. Between December 2013 and January 2014, several hundred thousand people fled abuse and violence in CAR, seeking refuge in Chad and Cameroon. After several months of displacement, the Central Africans who reach Cameroon arrive exhausted and traumatized. Their health status is alarming, particularly in terms of nutrition, with nearly half of the children suffering from malnutrition. “There are still massive deficits in the distribution of aid to the hundreds of thousands who managed to escape the violence and reach Chad or Cameroon,” said Dr. Mego Terzian, MSF’s international president. “The bare minimum that can be done for this population that has suffered incredible violence, lost family members, and been uprooted from their homes, is to provide them with humanitarian assistance.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Laurence Hoenig/MSF

In a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) tent in Garoua-Boulaï District Hospital in Cameroon, MSF nurse Gervais changes the bandages of a patient transferred from the MSF hospital in Bouar, Central African Republic (CAR). MSF supports the hospital in Garoua-Boulaï: in one week, the team provided more than 900 medical consultations. Between December 2013 and January 2014, several hundred thousand people fled abuse and violence in CAR, seeking refuge in Chad and Cameroon. After several months of displacement, the Central Africans who reach Cameroon arrive exhausted and traumatized. Their health status is alarming, particularly in terms of nutrition, with nearly half of the children suffering from malnutrition. “There are still massive deficits in the distribution of aid to the hundreds of thousands who managed to escape the violence and reach Chad or Cameroon,” said Dr. Mego Terzian, MSF’s international president. “The bare minimum that can be done for this population that has suffered incredible violence, lost family members, and been uprooted from their homes, is to provide them with humanitarian assistance.” Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
Here, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) staff members provide a medical consultation inside the Muslim camp for internally displaced persons in Carnot Catholic Church in Central African Republic (CAR). Since December 2013, extreme violence in the Central African Republic continues, and frontlines continue to shift with regular clashes between anti-Balaka militias and ex-Séléka rebel groups, as well as criminal elements who act with impunity. Although international forces on the ground are growing in number, they are still unable to secure the protection of the civilian population, in particular the Muslim communities that have either fled or live in a few enclaves under international armed protection. In Carnot, around 900 Muslim internally displaced persons are staying at the Catholic Church in crowded and unsanitary conditions, guarded by African Union soldiers from Cameroon.MSF provides medical care, water and food, and sanitation. MSF has also been running  an HIV/TB project in the area  since 2010 and provides support to three health centers, mainly for conditions such as malaria, respiratory infections, and diarrhea. Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

Here, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) staff members provide a medical consultation inside the Muslim camp for internally displaced persons in Carnot Catholic Church in Central African Republic (CAR). Since December 2013, extreme violence in the Central African Republic continues, and frontlines continue to shift with regular clashes between anti-Balaka militias and ex-Séléka rebel groups, as well as criminal elements who act with impunity. Although international forces on the ground are growing in number, they are still unable to secure the protection of the civilian population, in particular the Muslim communities that have either fled or live in a few enclaves under international armed protection. In Carnot, around 900 Muslim internally displaced persons are staying at the Catholic Church in crowded and unsanitary conditions, guarded by African Union soldiers from Cameroon.MSF provides medical care, water and food, and sanitation. MSF has also been running  an HIV/TB project in the area  since 2010 and provides support to three health centers, mainly for conditions such as malaria, respiratory infections, and diarrhea. Read more: http://bit.ly/1std1C2

Photo by Samantha Maurin/MSF
Refugees pose for a photo in the Clément center in N’Djamena, the capital of Chad. Six hundred Central African refugees are living in this transit center constructed by the government of Chad in order to accommodate the 15,000 people who were evacuated from Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR), by air. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) conducts medical consultations in each of the eight sites hosting the CAR refugees in N’Djamena. MSF’s mobile teams found many patients in need of basic health care, as well as several serious post-op cases that required follow-up. There is an increasing need of water and sanitation provision, which MSF teams are supporting. MSF has also set up operations in the south of Chad, in Bitoye and Sido, where an additional 25,000 refugees have arrived from CAR.

Photo by Samantha Maurin/MSF

Refugees pose for a photo in the Clément center in N’Djamena, the capital of Chad. Six hundred Central African refugees are living in this transit center constructed by the government of Chad in order to accommodate the 15,000 people who were evacuated from Bangui, Central African Republic (CAR), by air. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) conducts medical consultations in each of the eight sites hosting the CAR refugees in N’Djamena. MSF’s mobile teams found many patients in need of basic health care, as well as several serious post-op cases that required follow-up. There is an increasing need of water and sanitation provision, which MSF teams are supporting. MSF has also set up operations in the south of Chad, in Bitoye and Sido, where an additional 25,000 refugees have arrived from CAR.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
The MSF-supported Mamadou M’Baïki health center serves a diverse neighborhood that has nonetheless seen the exodus of many Muslim inhabitants, who have fled violence. Between January, a month after MSF first began to provide support to the Mamadou M’Baïki center, and May 2014, the percentage of Muslim patients served has gone from 30% to less than 10%. "We have no other choice than to flee," said a displaced person waiting in a transit camp near Bangui airport in February.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

The MSF-supported Mamadou M’Baïki health center serves a diverse neighborhood that has nonetheless seen the exodus of many Muslim inhabitants, who have fled violence. Between January, a month after MSF first began to provide support to the Mamadou M’Baïki center, and May 2014, the percentage of Muslim patients served has gone from 30% to less than 10%. "We have no other choice than to flee," said a displaced person waiting in a transit camp near Bangui airport in February.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
Here, a mother and child wait for non-food item distribution at an MSF mobile clinic in the Central African Republic (CAR). Since the beginning of February, MSF sends a mobile clinic several times a week to the Central Mosque of Bangui, the capital of the CAR, in the district of PK5. There, thousands of displaced people are gathered, afraid to go to the local Mamadou M’Baïki health center, which is supported by MSF. In the month of May alone, 583 consultations were provided provided, and patients include 93 children.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

Here, a mother and child wait for non-food item distribution at an MSF mobile clinic in the Central African Republic (CAR). Since the beginning of February, MSF sends a mobile clinic several times a week to the Central Mosque of Bangui, the capital of the CAR, in the district of PK5. There, thousands of displaced people are gathered, afraid to go to the local Mamadou M’Baïki health center, which is supported by MSF. In the month of May alone, 583 consultations were provided provided, and patients include 93 children.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
 A young boy, displaced by conflict in the Central African Republic (CAR), peers through the curtains of a temporary shelter at the Mamadou M’Baïki health center in the PK5 Muslim neighborhood of Bangui, which MSF has been supporting since December. In May, MSF referred 19 malnourished children to an existing Action Against Hunger (ACF) project in Bangui. While the Ministry of Health will take over medical care for adults on July 1st, 2014, MSF will continue to provide free pediatric care to children 0-15 years old, and free medication to patients of all ages.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

 A young boy, displaced by conflict in the Central African Republic (CAR), peers through the curtains of a temporary shelter at the Mamadou M’Baïki health center in the PK5 Muslim neighborhood of Bangui, which MSF has been supporting since December. In May, MSF referred 19 malnourished children to an existing Action Against Hunger (ACF) project in Bangui. While the Ministry of Health will take over medical care for adults on July 1st, 2014, MSF will continue to provide free pediatric care to children 0-15 years old, and free medication to patients of all ages.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
A mother and child wait for the results of a blood test for malaria in the PK5 district of Bangui. The time from testing to results is 15 minutes, and provides a positive or negative result by searching for parasites in the blood. Malaria is transmitted when one is bitten by an infected Anopheles mosquito carrying the parasite. In 2012, malaria caused an estimated 627,000 deaths, mostly among African children, but is both preventable and curable when caught in time. Control and preventative measures can dramatically reduce the incidence of this disease.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

A mother and child wait for the results of a blood test for malaria in the PK5 district of Bangui. The time from testing to results is 15 minutes, and provides a positive or negative result by searching for parasites in the blood. Malaria is transmitted when one is bitten by an infected Anopheles mosquito carrying the parasite. In 2012, malaria caused an estimated 627,000 deaths, mostly among African children, but is both preventable and curable when caught in time. Control and preventative measures can dramatically reduce the incidence of this disease.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF
"Malaria kills more than bullets," said an MSF nurse in the PK5 district of Bangui in February. Here, boxes of malaria antigen detection tests, which allow for rapid diagnosis in the absence of a traditional laboratory, are shown sorted by negative or positive results. In May, 687 consultations were conducted for malaria patients. Malaria remains one of the primary public health problems in the Central African Republic and the leading cause of death among children.

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

"Malaria kills more than bullets," said an MSF nurse in the PK5 district of Bangui in February. Here, boxes of malaria antigen detection tests, which allow for rapid diagnosis in the absence of a traditional laboratory, are shown sorted by negative or positive results. In May, 687 consultations were conducted for malaria patients. Malaria remains one of the primary public health problems in the Central African Republic and the leading cause of death among children.

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF
This past weekend, MSF treated 28 people injured during fighting in Bangui, Central African Republic. Of those patients, 16 were women and four were children, from babies up to 15 years old. Most injuries were caused by bullets and grenade shrapnel. Read the latest report:http://bit.ly/1mFMRZK

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

This past weekend, MSF treated 28 people injured during fighting in Bangui, Central African Republic. Of those patients, 16 were women and four were children, from babies up to 15 years old. Most injuries were caused by bullets and grenade shrapnel. Read the latest report:http://bit.ly/1mFMRZK

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF
The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

Photo by Samantha Maurin /MSF

The refugees, including many children, from CAR who’ve arrived seeking safety in Sido, Chad, have witnessed the worst atrocities. “Most of the refugees who told me their stories did so in a monotone, with solemn faces,” said an MSF psychiatrist, “without going into details about the bodies carved up in the massacres, keeping their distance from the expression of painful emotions.”http://bit.ly/1mfQyVR

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF
An MSF medical worker measures a displaced child for malnutrition. Muslim communities in many towns in western Central African Republic (CAR) have been attacked in recent weeks and residents have fled. In the town of Carnot, on several occasions, armed men entered the grounds of the city hospital where MSF is working, either in an attempt to kill patients or to attack displaced people living there. The hospital teams had to intervene each time. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian/MSF

An MSF medical worker measures a displaced child for malnutrition. Muslim communities in many towns in western Central African Republic (CAR) have been attacked in recent weeks and residents have fled. In the town of Carnot, on several occasions, armed men entered the grounds of the city hospital where MSF is working, either in an attempt to kill patients or to attack displaced people living there. The hospital teams had to intervene each time. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian
Displaced children take shelter in a church in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). Nearly 1,000 people, most of them Muslim, have been trapped, surrounded, and threatened by armed militias since Feb. 1 in this area of southwestern CAR. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by Remi Djian

Displaced children take shelter in a church in Carnot, Central African Republic (CAR). Nearly 1,000 people, most of them Muslim, have been trapped, surrounded, and threatened by armed militias since Feb. 1 in this area of southwestern CAR. Read more: http://bit.ly/1czCb5W

Photo by William Daniels
MSF medical staff prepare an injured man to be moved across town from a camp to a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. Due to fighting between two main armed groups, many people in Bangui have been affected by extreme violence. Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by William Daniels

MSF medical staff prepare an injured man to be moved across town from a camp to a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. Due to fighting between two main armed groups, many people in Bangui have been affected by extreme violence. Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by William Daniels
   MSF medical staff treat a man who was hit by an arrow at Mpoko airport camp in Bangui, Central African Republic. Around 100,000 people displaced by violence are sheltering at the camp. MSF has provided medical care to about 1,000 people so far.  Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by William Daniels

MSF medical staff treat a man who was hit by an arrow at Mpoko airport camp in Bangui, Central African Republic. Around 100,000 people displaced by violence are sheltering at the camp. MSF has provided medical care to about 1,000 people so far.  Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

Dorassio is 23. He is among the many victims of the inter-communal violence taking place in the Central African Republic today. On January 18, he was shot in the arm in Bouar, in the country’s Northwest region. His arm had to be amputated. He was treated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Bouar, and then transferred by plane to the Bangui Community Hospital, where our surgical teams continue to monitor his condition. Here, Dorassio waits to be moved into the operating room at the Community Hospital. This will be his fifth operation since he arrived at the hospital.  

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

Dorassio is 23. He is among the many victims of the inter-communal violence taking place in the Central African Republic today. On January 18, he was shot in the arm in Bouar, in the country’s Northwest region. His arm had to be amputated. He was treated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Bouar, and then transferred by plane to the Bangui Community Hospital, where our surgical teams continue to monitor his condition. Here, Dorassio waits to be moved into the operating room at the Community Hospital. This will be his fifth operation since he arrived at the hospital.