Posts tagged car

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF
This past weekend, MSF treated 28 people injured during fighting in Bangui, Central African Republic. Of those patients, 16 were women and four were children, from babies up to 15 years old. Most injuries were caused by bullets and grenade shrapnel. Read the latest report:http://bit.ly/1mFMRZK

Photo by Mathieu Fortoul/MSF

This past weekend, MSF treated 28 people injured during fighting in Bangui, Central African Republic. Of those patients, 16 were women and four were children, from babies up to 15 years old. Most injuries were caused by bullets and grenade shrapnel. Read the latest report:http://bit.ly/1mFMRZK

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi
“Our teams have witnessed the consequences of extreme violence, including bullet wounds, maiming from attacks, and lynchings, which are daily realities in Bangui.” Read an update of MSF’s activities in Central African Republic:http://bit.ly/1ebCM36

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi

“Our teams have witnessed the consequences of extreme violence, including bullet wounds, maiming from attacks, and lynchings, which are daily realities in Bangui.” Read an update of MSF’s activities in Central African Republic:http://bit.ly/1ebCM36

Photo by Ton Koene
Join us Dec. 4 for “Disaster, Ignored”, a webcast on the current situation in Central African Republic (CAR). Violence in CAR has raged on over the last year, displacing some 400,000 people and further worsening their access to health care. MSF Director of Operations Marie-Noelle Rodrigue, and two US-based aid workers, nurse Michelle Mays and Dr. Yolaine Civil, will lead the discussion. Register here: http://disasterignored.eventbrite.com/

Photo by Ton Koene

Join us Dec. 4 for “Disaster, Ignored”, a webcast on the current situation in Central African Republic (CAR). Violence in CAR has raged on over the last year, displacing some 400,000 people and further worsening their access to health care. MSF Director of Operations Marie-Noelle Rodrigue, and two US-based aid workers, nurse Michelle Mays and Dr. Yolaine Civil, will lead the discussion. Register here: http://disasterignored.eventbrite.com/

Photo by Jacob Zocherman
The view from an MSF vehicle in Central African Republic. The roads outside the capital Bangui are minimal, and during the rainy season impassable. MSF scaled up its projects in CAR when a coup d’état in March left communities with no access to any health care. Clinics were looted, health workers fled, and the loss of income made it impossible for people to pay for health care. MSF is providing treatment for HIV, malaria, malnutrition, and more.

Photo by Jacob Zocherman

The view from an MSF vehicle in Central African Republic. The roads outside the capital Bangui are minimal, and during the rainy season impassable. MSF scaled up its projects in CAR when a coup d’état in March left communities with no access to any health care. Clinics were looted, health workers fled, and the loss of income made it impossible for people to pay for health care. MSF is providing treatment for HIV, malaria, malnutrition, and more.

Fortunately MSF is here because the hospital was completely trashed and looted during the entry of the rebels into Bossangoa. I was afraid I would not have medications to continue my treatment, because there was nothing. But today, I have medicine.
Photo by Ton Koene
Women wait with their children at an MSF mobile clinic in northwestern Central African Republic. A coup d’etat in March drove out most health workers and the clinics were looted; leaving people with no access to medical care during malaria season. http://bit.ly/186hHon

Photo by Ton Koene

Women wait with their children at an MSF mobile clinic in northwestern Central African Republic. A coup d’etat in March drove out most health workers and the clinics were looted; leaving people with no access to medical care during malaria season. http://bit.ly/186hHon

Photo by Ton Koene
The upheaval in Central African Republic has meant HIV treatment interruptions and mounting medical needs. Meanwhile, health workers flee with their families to safety and the malaria season starts. MSF tries to respond to this ‘crisis on top of a crisis’.” 
Read more - http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/news/article.cfm?id=6804

Photo by Ton Koene

The upheaval in Central African Republic has meant HIV treatment interruptions and mounting medical needs. Meanwhile, health workers flee with their families to safety and the malaria season starts. MSF tries to respond to this ‘crisis on top of a crisis’.” 

Read more - http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/news/article.cfm?id=6804

Photo: Patients at the community hospital in Bangui, where MSF treated people wounded in conflict. CAR 2013 © Francois Beda/MSF
In Central African Republic, the Violence Has Ended But the Emergency Continues
“At the height of the crisis, confrontations, shootings, and abuses occurred daily. Today, tension and violence have subsided and we are now in a particularly delicate phase—a sort of false calm that is both fragile and potentially explosive. Seleka’s two main groups will have to begin negotiations to establish an imminent power-sharing arrangement. There could be friction and clashes within this young coalition,” says MSF head of mission in CAR, Serge St-Louis.
As a medical organization, we are very concerned about the unmet needs among a population that was already very vulnerable prior to the Seleka offensive. There are thousands of displaced persons who now live in extremely precarious conditions, without medical care, shelter, food, or water. The health situation is critical in several regions. There are serious shortages of drugs and supplies and there are no health care personnel in the medical facilities. Based on our latest admission figures, the seasonal epidemic of malaria, which is endemic in the CAR, appears to have begun and will surge in the rainy season.

Photo: Patients at the community hospital in Bangui, where MSF treated people wounded in conflict. CAR 2013 © Francois Beda/MSF

In Central African Republic, the Violence Has Ended But the Emergency Continues

“At the height of the crisis, confrontations, shootings, and abuses occurred daily. Today, tension and violence have subsided and we are now in a particularly delicate phase—a sort of false calm that is both fragile and potentially explosive. Seleka’s two main groups will have to begin negotiations to establish an imminent power-sharing arrangement. There could be friction and clashes within this young coalition,” says MSF head of mission in CAR, Serge St-Louis.

As a medical organization, we are very concerned about the unmet needs among a population that was already very vulnerable prior to the Seleka offensive. There are thousands of displaced persons who now live in extremely precarious conditions, without medical care, shelter, food, or water. The health situation is critical in several regions. There are serious shortages of drugs and supplies and there are no health care personnel in the medical facilities. Based on our latest admission figures, the seasonal epidemic of malaria, which is endemic in the CAR, appears to have begun and will surge in the rainy season.

Photo: Jordan, 14, injured during the fighting in Bangui, CAR. CAR 2013 © Francois Beda/MSF
 In CAR, Situation Stabilizing but Tense
Jordan, 14, lives in the Miskine neighborhood of the eighth arrondissement in Bangui. His mother explains what happened to her son during the fighting.
“Jordan was with me at home when the rebels entered Bangui. They fired their rifles and Jordan was hit in the leg by a stray bullet. A pastor from our church took him to the hospital. We’ve been at the community hospital since Sunday. I saw that MSF was working in the hospital and helping the medical staff treat the wounded – there are lots of them. My son is doing better. I hope that he will recover quickly and that we’ll be able to go home very soon.”

Photo: Jordan, 14, injured during the fighting in Bangui, CAR. CAR 2013 © Francois Beda/MSF

 In CAR, Situation Stabilizing but Tense

Jordan, 14, lives in the Miskine neighborhood of the eighth arrondissement in Bangui. His mother explains what happened to her son during the fighting.

“Jordan was with me at home when the rebels entered Bangui. They fired their rifles and Jordan was hit in the leg by a stray bullet. A pastor from our church took him to the hospital. We’ve been at the community hospital since Sunday. I saw that MSF was working in the hospital and helping the medical staff treat the wounded – there are lots of them. My son is doing better. I hope that he will recover quickly and that we’ll be able to go home very soon.”

We also notice the fear in the population—people are still afraid to go out, to leave their homes; and there is no public transport, so even if people do want to get back to work, it’s difficult for them to move around.
Photo: MSF doctor finds a way to bring a smile to her patient. CAR 2012 © Corentin Fohlen/Divergence

Photo: MSF doctor finds a way to bring a smile to her patient. CAR 2012 © Corentin Fohlen/Divergence

Photo: A sign prohibits firearms in an MSF facility in a town outside Bangui. CAR 2007 © Spencer Platt
Central African Republic: All Parties Must Allow Access to Health Care
Violence and insecurity in Bangui over the last 48 hours have seriously disrupted MSF’s operations and prevented critically wounded patients from being referred to surgical facilities. Displaced people throughout the country and in major cities taken by Seleka are also too fearful to access health facilities. MSF facilities in Bangui and Batangafo have been looted and robbed. 
“MSF condemns the looting and robberies of our facilities and reminds all parties that medical personnel must be respected and protected and must be granted all available help in the performance of their duties,” said Serge St. Louis, MSF head of mission in Bangui. 
All parties to the conflict must respect medical structures, ambulances, medical personnel, and sick and wounded patients, and guarantee access to health facilities without the risk of being targeted, MSF said.

Photo: A sign prohibits firearms in an MSF facility in a town outside Bangui. CAR 2007 © Spencer Platt

Central African Republic: All Parties Must Allow Access to Health Care

Violence and insecurity in Bangui over the last 48 hours have seriously disrupted MSF’s operations and prevented critically wounded patients from being referred to surgical facilities. Displaced people throughout the country and in major cities taken by Seleka are also too fearful to access health facilities. MSF facilities in Bangui and Batangafo have been looted and robbed. 

“MSF condemns the looting and robberies of our facilities and reminds all parties that medical personnel must be respected and protected and must be granted all available help in the performance of their duties,” said Serge St. Louis, MSF head of mission in Bangui. 

All parties to the conflict must respect medical structures, ambulances, medical personnel, and sick and wounded patients, and guarantee access to health facilities without the risk of being targeted, MSF said.

Photo: Patients wait for triage at the Damara Health Center in the Central African Republic.CAR 2013 © Chloé Cébron/MSF
MSF Expands Emergency Services in CAR While Waiting For Peace Deal To Take Hold
As the government of Central African Republic (CAR) attempts to implement a peace deal it struck with rebel groups in the country, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is continuing to expand its emergency response to thousands of people who have been affected by the conflict. MSF is also negotiating for greater access to areas where health care staff has fled and basic medical services are no longer available.
In recent weeks, as the conflict worsened, thousands of civilians fled their homes and sought refuge in the bush, where they tried to subsist without proper shelter, safe drinking water, or access to medical services. On January 10, MSF opened an emergency project in the government-held frontline town of Damara and began providing basic health care, conducting mobile clinics, and supporting displaced people in order to prevent deaths due to common illnesses such as diarrhea, respiratory infections, and malaria, which is a chronic health care threat in CAR. Medical staff has been treating up to 100 patients per day, most of them for malaria and malnutrition.
"The Central African population already suffers from some of the worst health indicators in the world, with alarming mortality rates even in peaceful times,” says Sylvain Groulx, an MSF coordinator in CAR. “Because of the recent instability, many people have been forced to displace themselves. An added burden is the fact that many local health facilities closed when medical staff fled into the bush. The few health posts that have remained open are either running out of basic essential medicines or, worse, had their stock completely looted.”

Photo: Patients wait for triage at the Damara Health Center in the Central African Republic.CAR 2013 © Chloé Cébron/MSF

MSF Expands Emergency Services in CAR While Waiting For Peace Deal To Take Hold

As the government of Central African Republic (CAR) attempts to implement a peace deal it struck with rebel groups in the country, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is continuing to expand its emergency response to thousands of people who have been affected by the conflict. MSF is also negotiating for greater access to areas where health care staff has fled and basic medical services are no longer available.

In recent weeks, as the conflict worsened, thousands of civilians fled their homes and sought refuge in the bush, where they tried to subsist without proper shelter, safe drinking water, or access to medical services. On January 10, MSF opened an emergency project in the government-held frontline town of Damara and began providing basic health care, conducting mobile clinics, and supporting displaced people in order to prevent deaths due to common illnesses such as diarrhea, respiratory infections, and malaria, which is a chronic health care threat in CAR. Medical staff has been treating up to 100 patients per day, most of them for malaria and malnutrition.

"The Central African population already suffers from some of the worst health indicators in the world, with alarming mortality rates even in peaceful times,” says Sylvain Groulx, an MSF coordinator in CAR. “Because of the recent instability, many people have been forced to displace themselves. An added burden is the fact that many local health facilities closed when medical staff fled into the bush. The few health posts that have remained open are either running out of basic essential medicines or, worse, had their stock completely looted.”

Photo: Young mothers and their newborns at the Maternity service of the MSF-supported hospital in Batangafo. CAR 2012 © Chloé Cébron
As Violence Surges Anew in CAR, Families Again Flee Into The Bush
On December 20, the rebel coalition known as “Seleka, which has attacked several locations in the north of Central African Republic (CAR) in recent days, entered the town of Batangafo, where Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been supporting the main hospital.
The previous day, after the rebels announced their intention to move towards Bouca, through the town of Batangafo, FACA—the Central African military forces—the gendarmerie, and all public authorities fled the town. Numerous civilians, scared by the threat of an attack, also left Batangafo to seek refuge into the bush. The rebels entered and took the town 24 hours later.
MSF maintains its team on the ground and is continuing its activities at the hospital, though the number of consultations dropped from 193 the day before the rebels’ advances to 38 on the day after they entered the town.
Testimonies collected by MSF’s team in Batangafo a few hours before rebels entered the town illustrate the fear pervasive among a population that has already endured more than 10 years of armed conflicts. Fleeing into the bush has become almost routine at this point, though it certainly hasn’t gotten any easier or less fraught. “I am very worried by the situation, said a 55-year-old woman named Ghislaine. “Yesterday the kids at school fled in the bush when they heard that armed troops were arriving in town. We did not know where they were. We are so scared.”
According to Enoch Nodl-ya, an MSF anesthetist nurse at Batangafo hospital, “for the last ten years the population has endured the regular presence and attacks from armed men in this region. People are scared and flee rapidly into the bush. As a consequence, many women give birth in the fields without any assistance and most sick or wounded are hesitant to receive medical assistance, scared of possible violence in the populated areas. When the violence stops, we often see patients coming in an advance stage of their diseases.”

Photo: Young mothers and their newborns at the Maternity service of the MSF-supported hospital in Batangafo. CAR 2012 © Chloé Cébron

As Violence Surges Anew in CAR, Families Again Flee Into The Bush

On December 20, the rebel coalition known as “Seleka, which has attacked several locations in the north of Central African Republic (CAR) in recent days, entered the town of Batangafo, where Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been supporting the main hospital.

The previous day, after the rebels announced their intention to move towards Bouca, through the town of Batangafo, FACA—the Central African military forces—the gendarmerie, and all public authorities fled the town. Numerous civilians, scared by the threat of an attack, also left Batangafo to seek refuge into the bush. The rebels entered and took the town 24 hours later.

MSF maintains its team on the ground and is continuing its activities at the hospital, though the number of consultations dropped from 193 the day before the rebels’ advances to 38 on the day after they entered the town.

Testimonies collected by MSF’s team in Batangafo a few hours before rebels entered the town illustrate the fear pervasive among a population that has already endured more than 10 years of armed conflicts. Fleeing into the bush has become almost routine at this point, though it certainly hasn’t gotten any easier or less fraught. “I am very worried by the situation, said a 55-year-old woman named Ghislaine. “Yesterday the kids at school fled in the bush when they heard that armed troops were arriving in town. We did not know where they were. We are so scared.”

According to Enoch Nodl-ya, an MSF anesthetist nurse at Batangafo hospital, “for the last ten years the population has endured the regular presence and attacks from armed men in this region. People are scared and flee rapidly into the bush. As a consequence, many women give birth in the fields without any assistance and most sick or wounded are hesitant to receive medical assistance, scared of possible violence in the populated areas. When the violence stops, we often see patients coming in an advance stage of their diseases.”

Our patient from the other day first presented to an outside clinic, where there is no surgeon, when he still felt too weak to stand several days after being beaten with fists and sticks. He was admitted to the clinic with a swollen, distended abdomen and increasing pain, given intravenous fluids, evaluated with an X-ray and a blood count, suggesting blood loss, followed by a phone call to our project chief and a discussion with me about transfer. At home this patient would have had a CT scan to identify whether he had an injury to the spleen and/or liver, plus checked for signs of other injuries that would suggest he needed surgery. With a stable liver or spleen injury, he would be placed at bed rest to minimize the chance of recurrent bleeding. Here in the Central African Republic the choice was to risk leaving him at a facility that had no capability for an operation or transfer him to Paoua by LandRover with the risk of making any potential bleeding worse, as the trip is slightly less jarring than playing a game of rugby. We told them to send him over as soon as they could. Due to a combination of vehicle availability, road conditions and security issues, it was a full 24 hours before he arrived in Paoua, now almost six days from his initial injury.
Excerpt from MSF surgeon, David Lauter’s, Wait, Watch, Act field blog post.