Posts tagged camp

Photo by William Daniels
MSF medical staff prepare an injured man to be moved across town from a camp to a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. Due to fighting between two main armed groups, many people in Bangui have been affected by extreme violence. Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by William Daniels

MSF medical staff prepare an injured man to be moved across town from a camp to a hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic. Due to fighting between two main armed groups, many people in Bangui have been affected by extreme violence. Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by William Daniels
   MSF medical staff treat a man who was hit by an arrow at Mpoko airport camp in Bangui, Central African Republic. Around 100,000 people displaced by violence are sheltering at the camp. MSF has provided medical care to about 1,000 people so far.  Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by William Daniels

MSF medical staff treat a man who was hit by an arrow at Mpoko airport camp in Bangui, Central African Republic. Around 100,000 people displaced by violence are sheltering at the camp. MSF has provided medical care to about 1,000 people so far.  Read more: http://bit.ly/1nqaSzY

Photo by Wairimu Gitau/MSF
A mother and her four children walked hundreds of miles from Juba, South Sudan, to the Nadapal border with Kenya where they became refugees from the fighting in their home country. In Nadapal, an MSF emergency team referred them to a hospital where they were tested for measles. Read more about the conflict in South Sudan: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Wairimu Gitau/MSF

A mother and her four children walked hundreds of miles from Juba, South Sudan, to the Nadapal border with Kenya where they became refugees from the fighting in their home country. In Nadapal, an MSF emergency team referred them to a hospital where they were tested for measles. Read more about the conflict in South Sudan: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Phil Moore
A girl recovers in an MSF clinic after suffering an electric shock from an exposed wire in a refugee camp in Juba, South Sudan. Roughly 300 miles north of Juba, in Malakal, MSF was forced to suspend its medical activities last week after the MSF compound was looted. Thousands of people were left without medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Phil Moore

A girl recovers in an MSF clinic after suffering an electric shock from an exposed wire in a refugee camp in Juba, South Sudan. Roughly 300 miles north of Juba, in Malakal, MSF was forced to suspend its medical activities last week after the MSF compound was looted. Thousands of people were left without medical care. Read more: http://bit.ly/1aohxdM

Photo by Jacob Simkin/MSF
South Sudan: Since fighting erupted in Bor, Jonglei State, people have been fleeing to the town of Awerial, in neighboring Lakes State, seeking safety. The area does not have the capacity to absorb all of the new arrivals, and living conditions are near catastrophic. More medical and humanitarian assistance is urgently needed. See a slideshow: http://bit.ly/1bWgOuq

Photo by Jacob Simkin/MSF

South Sudan: Since fighting erupted in Bor, Jonglei State, people have been fleeing to the town of Awerial, in neighboring Lakes State, seeking safety. The area does not have the capacity to absorb all of the new arrivals, and living conditions are near catastrophic. More medical and humanitarian assistance is urgently needed. See a slideshow: http://bit.ly/1bWgOuq

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Roughly one in 10 people in Central African Republic (CAR) have been driven from their homes by violence that has overwhelmed the country since a coup in March 2013. "We are extremely concerned about the living conditions of the displaced,” said Sylvain Groulx, MSF head of mission in CAR, “who are overcrowded in churches, mosques, or schools, or living in the bush with no access to health care, food, or water, and are threatened by epidemics. Much more needs to be done and it needs to be done now."

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Roughly one in 10 people in Central African Republic (CAR) have been driven from their homes by violence that has overwhelmed the country since a coup in March 2013. "We are extremely concerned about the living conditions of the displaced,” said Sylvain Groulx, MSF head of mission in CAR, “who are overcrowded in churches, mosques, or schools, or living in the bush with no access to health care, food, or water, and are threatened by epidemics. Much more needs to be done and it needs to be done now."

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
New fighting and threats against civilians near the town of Bouca, Central African Republic (CAR), have pushed hundreds more people out of their homes, making the massive humanitarian crisis in this country even more severe. Watch our webcast on the situation in CAR on Dec. 4: http://disasterignored.eventbrite.com/

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

New fighting and threats against civilians near the town of Bouca, Central African Republic (CAR), have pushed hundreds more people out of their homes, making the massive humanitarian crisis in this country even more severe. Watch our webcast on the situation in CAR on Dec. 4: http://disasterignored.eventbrite.com/

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF
Years of political and military instability in CAR have left the country in a chronic state of humanitarian crisis, particularly as it pertains to public health. The Ministry of Health has almost no presence outside of Bangui, the capital. There is just one doctor per 55,000 people and one nurse or midwife per 7,000 residents, according the United Nations, and most of those are in the capital. Read more: http://bit.ly/1exTtTP

Photo by Juan Carlos Tomasi/MSF

Years of political and military instability in CAR have left the country in a chronic state of humanitarian crisis, particularly as it pertains to public health. The Ministry of Health has almost no presence outside of Bangui, the capital. There is just one doctor per 55,000 people and one nurse or midwife per 7,000 residents, according the United Nations, and most of those are in the capital. Read more: http://bit.ly/1exTtTP

“Refugee children are incredibly vulnerable to developing vaccine-preventable diseases, so why do we keep hearing the players in the global vaccination community tell us these kids aren’t their problem?” asked Kate Elder, vaccines policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. Read more

“Refugee children are incredibly vulnerable to developing vaccine-preventable diseases, so why do we keep hearing the players in the global vaccination community tell us these kids aren’t their problem?” asked Kate Elder, vaccines policy advisor at MSF’s Access Campaign. Read more

Photo © Enass Abu Khalaf-Tuffaha/MSF
There are nearly 500,000 Syrian refugees in Jordan; 100,000 of whom are living in Zaatari camp in the north. Every day 1,000 more people arrive at the camp. MSF has increased its staff and activities there, including opening a pediatric hospital and an outpatient clinic for children in the last couple of months. But, like other health providers in Zaatari, MSF refers the most severe cases to Jordanian public hospitals outside the camp, which are already nearing full capacity.
Jordan is not able to deal with the rising needs as people continue to arrive. The country needs increased international aid soon or they will have to resort to drastic measures, like blocking all refugee access to the country or restricting access to public facilities. Read more: http://bit.ly/15eNkY7

Photo © Enass Abu Khalaf-Tuffaha/MSF

There are nearly 500,000 Syrian refugees in Jordan; 100,000 of whom are living in Zaatari camp in the north. Every day 1,000 more people arrive at the camp. MSF has increased its staff and activities there, including opening a pediatric hospital and an outpatient clinic for children in the last couple of months. But, like other health providers in Zaatari, MSF refers the most severe cases to Jordanian public hospitals outside the camp, which are already nearing full capacity.

Jordan is not able to deal with the rising needs as people continue to arrive. The country needs increased international aid soon or they will have to resort to drastic measures, like blocking all refugee access to the country or restricting access to public facilities. Read more: http://bit.ly/15eNkY7

Photo: Destroyed medical supplies litter the ground outside the MSF hospital in Pibor. South Sudan 2013 © Vikki Stienen/MSF
South Sudan: MSF Hospital Severely Damaged in Intentional Attack
MSF strongly condemns the deliberate damage and looting of its hospital in Pibor town, in South Sudan’s Jonglei State, which has left tens of thousands of people without access to essential medical care.
The hospital’s infrastructure was systematically damaged May 11–12 in order to render it unusable without major repairs. Therapeutic medical food and hospital beds were looted. The MSF structure is the only hospital facility for Pibor County, with the nearest alternative more than 90 miles away. The hospital’s closure leaves roughly 100,000 people cut off from health care. Many of them have fled to the bush amid conflict between the South Sudan Army (SPLA) and the David YauYau armed militia group.
"A special effort was made to destroy drug supplies by strewing them on the ground, to cut and slash the warehouse tents, to ransack the hospital wards, and even to cut electricity cables and rip them from the walls," said Richard Veerman, MSF operations coordinator for South Sudan.

Photo: Destroyed medical supplies litter the ground outside the MSF hospital in Pibor. South Sudan 2013 © Vikki Stienen/MSF

South Sudan: MSF Hospital Severely Damaged in Intentional Attack

MSF strongly condemns the deliberate damage and looting of its hospital in Pibor town, in South Sudan’s Jonglei State, which has left tens of thousands of people without access to essential medical care.

The hospital’s infrastructure was systematically damaged May 11–12 in order to render it unusable without major repairs. Therapeutic medical food and hospital beds were looted. The MSF structure is the only hospital facility for Pibor County, with the nearest alternative more than 90 miles away. The hospital’s closure leaves roughly 100,000 people cut off from health care. Many of them have fled to the bush amid conflict between the South Sudan Army (SPLA) and the David YauYau armed militia group.

"A special effort was made to destroy drug supplies by strewing them on the ground, to cut and slash the warehouse tents, to ransack the hospital wards, and even to cut electricity cables and rip them from the walls," said Richard Veerman, MSF operations coordinator for South Sudan.

South Sudan: Preparing for the Rainy Season

At the Yida refugee camp in South Sudan, where the population has increased five-fold in the past year, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is treating growing numbers of patients and preparing for the additional hardships that will come with the approaching rainy season.

Photo: A herd of goats being driven out into the savannah to graze on the edge of the Mbera camp for Malian refugees in Mauritania. Mauritania 2013 © Nyani Quarmyne
Stranded in the Desert
The majority of the refugees in Mbera camp are pastoralists who lived nomadic or semi-nomadic lifestyles in Mali. Dependent on their livestock for a living, many of them fled with their cattles. However, 55% of the refugees interviewed left family members at home to tend to the livestock.

Photo: A herd of goats being driven out into the savannah to graze on the edge of the Mbera camp for Malian refugees in Mauritania. Mauritania 2013 © Nyani Quarmyne

Stranded in the Desert

The majority of the refugees in Mbera camp are pastoralists who lived nomadic or semi-nomadic lifestyles in Mali. Dependent on their livestock for a living, many of them fled with their cattles. However, 55% of the refugees interviewed left family members at home to tend to the livestock.

Photo: A doctor does his rounds in MSF’s Hepatitis E ward in Maban County’s Batil camp. South Sudan 2013 © Corinne Baker/MSF
MSF Responds To Hepatitis E Outbreak In South Sudan Refugee Camps
An epidemic of hepatitis E is escalating across refugee camps in South Sudan’s Maban County. To date, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has treated 3,991 patients in its health facilities in the camps and has recorded 88 deaths, including 15 pregnant women.
Hepatitis E is a virus that causes liver disease and can lead to acute liver failure and death. It is particularly dangerous for pregnant women. Like cholera, the virus spreads in environments with poor sanitation and contaminated water. There is no cure, but its symptoms are treatable.
“We have been doing everything we can to care for people with hepatitis E, but there is no treatment for the disease,” says Dr. José-Luis Dvorzak, MSF Medical Coordinator in Maban County. “We suspect this outbreak is far from over, and many more people will die.”

Photo: A doctor does his rounds in MSF’s Hepatitis E ward in Maban County’s Batil camp. South Sudan 2013 © Corinne Baker/MSF

MSF Responds To Hepatitis E Outbreak In South Sudan Refugee Camps

An epidemic of hepatitis E is escalating across refugee camps in South Sudan’s Maban County. To date, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has treated 3,991 patients in its health facilities in the camps and has recorded 88 deaths, including 15 pregnant women.

Hepatitis E is a virus that causes liver disease and can lead to acute liver failure and death. It is particularly dangerous for pregnant women. Like cholera, the virus spreads in environments with poor sanitation and contaminated water. There is no cure, but its symptoms are treatable.

“We have been doing everything we can to care for people with hepatitis E, but there is no treatment for the disease,” says Dr. José-Luis Dvorzak, MSF Medical Coordinator in Maban County. “We suspect this outbreak is far from over, and many more people will die.”

Photo: Sudanese refugees wait in line in the outpatient department at the MSF field hospital in Jamam refugee camp. South Sudan 2012 © Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
Fear and Hope in South Sudan as Refugees Start to Cross Border Again
More than 170,000 people who fled violence in Sudan are living in refugee camps in South Sudan. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been assisting the refugees since November 2011, running field hospitals and providing supplies of clean drinking water and oral rehydration fluids.
Now that the floods caused by the rainy season are subsiding refugees are starting to cross the border again. In December 2012, around 370 refugees arrived at the border village of El Fuj, traveling in two groups and arriving a few days apart. This is a small number compared to last year, when 35,000 people crossed the border in the space of just three weeks. Time will tell if the numbers will increase.
While the camps in South Sudan provide relative safety, refugees living there face dire conditions. There are still shortages of clean water—at times, 40 percent of medical consultations carried out by MSF were related to diarrhea—and there are ongoing occurrences of Hepatitis E. In Batil Camp (which hosts around 35,000 refugees), mortality rates were more than double emergency thresholds in summer 2012, and more than a quarter of the children under the age of five weremalnourished. Since September 2012, conditions have improved in many areas and mortality rates have dropped, but nutrition and food security are still serious concerns.

Photo: Sudanese refugees wait in line in the outpatient department at the MSF field hospital in Jamam refugee camp. South Sudan 2012 © Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Fear and Hope in South Sudan as Refugees Start to Cross Border Again

More than 170,000 people who fled violence in Sudan are living in refugee camps in South Sudan. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been assisting the refugees since November 2011, running field hospitals and providing supplies of clean drinking water and oral rehydration fluids.

Now that the floods caused by the rainy season are subsiding refugees are starting to cross the border again. In December 2012, around 370 refugees arrived at the border village of El Fuj, traveling in two groups and arriving a few days apart. This is a small number compared to last year, when 35,000 people crossed the border in the space of just three weeks. Time will tell if the numbers will increase.

While the camps in South Sudan provide relative safety, refugees living there face dire conditions. There are still shortages of clean water—at times, 40 percent of medical consultations carried out by MSF were related to diarrhea—and there are ongoing occurrences of Hepatitis E. In Batil Camp (which hosts around 35,000 refugees), mortality rates were more than double emergency thresholds in summer 2012, and more than a quarter of the children under the age of five weremalnourished. Since September 2012, conditions have improved in many areas and mortality rates have dropped, but nutrition and food security are still serious concerns.