Posts tagged burundi

Photo: Jeannine Ntunzwenimana holds her newborn baby. Burundi 2012 © Sarah ElliottMSF @ Instagram
Jeannine Ntunzwenimana, 20, was seven months pregnant when her water broke. “This is my second child, my first is three years and six months old. My first pregnancy was by c-section at the MSF hospital. My water broke early, I was very affraid because it was too soon. I went to the nearest health centre at Gitaza. It was one and a half hour walk away. An ambulance from MSF came to pick me up. The health centre called them because they said they weren’t able to help the baby. If MSF was not here, I could’ve died and my baby too. The way they welcome us is very different to other places.” Jeannine named her daughter Fridatienne Itangakubuntu who weighed 1.3 kilos when she was born two weeks ago. MSF has worked in Burundi since 1992. 
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Photo: Jeannine Ntunzwenimana holds her newborn baby. Burundi 2012 © Sarah Elliott

MSF @ Instagram

Jeannine Ntunzwenimana, 20, was seven months pregnant when her water broke. “This is my second child, my first is three years and six months old. My first pregnancy was by c-section at the MSF hospital. My water broke early, I was very affraid because it was too soon. I went to the nearest health centre at Gitaza. It was one and a half hour walk away. An ambulance from MSF came to pick me up. The health centre called them because they said they weren’t able to help the baby. If MSF was not here, I could’ve died and my baby too. The way they welcome us is very different to other places.” Jeannine named her daughter Fridatienne Itangakubuntu who weighed 1.3 kilos when she was born two weeks ago. MSF has worked in Burundi since 1992. 

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Safe Delivery: Reducing maternal mortality in Sierra Leone and BurundiEnsuring pregnant women have timely access to emergency obstetric care has reduced maternal deaths by as much as 74 percent in parts of two African countries 
The comprehensive emergency obstetric services at MSF hospitals in Bo and Kabezi is provided 24 hours a day, seven days a week. All services are free of charge. The total annual operating costs of the programs are equivalent to just under two dollars per person in Bo and $4.15 per person in Kabezi.
MSF’s data indicate that maternal mortality in Burundi’s Kabezi district has fallen to 208 per 100,000 live births, compared to a national average of 800 per 100,000 live births, a 74 percent decrease. In Sierra Leone, MSF figures for the same year indicate that maternal mortality in Bo district has decreased to 351 per 100,000 live births, compared to 890 per 100,000 in the rest of the country, a 61 percent reduction. MSF is the only emergency obstetric care provider in Kabezi and Bo.
Sierra Leone and Burundi both suffer from extremely high maternal mortality rates due to lack of access to quality antenatal and obstetric care, which are linked to shortages of qualified health staff, a lack of medical facilities, and health systems that have been shattered by years of civil war.
“Giving birth in Sierra Leone is often a life-threatening endeavor for many women,” said Betty Raney, an obstetrician with MSF in Sierra Leone. “In my 25 years as an obstetrician, I have never seen such a level of severity among the patients. Had they not had any access to care, many of them would die.”
Using the United Nations Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of reducing maternal mortality by 75 percent by 2015 as a point of reference, MSF’s estimates indicate that the maternal mortality ratio in Kabezi is already below the MDG level. MSF is confident that the mortality ratio will have dropped by 75 percent in Bo by 2015.

Safe Delivery: Reducing maternal mortality in Sierra Leone and Burundi
Ensuring pregnant women have timely access to emergency obstetric care has reduced maternal deaths by as much as 74 percent in parts of two African countries 

The comprehensive emergency obstetric services at MSF hospitals in Bo and Kabezi is provided 24 hours a day, seven days a week. All services are free of charge. The total annual operating costs of the programs are equivalent to just under two dollars per person in Bo and $4.15 per person in Kabezi.

MSF’s data indicate that maternal mortality in Burundi’s Kabezi district has fallen to 208 per 100,000 live births, compared to a national average of 800 per 100,000 live births, a 74 percent decrease. In Sierra Leone, MSF figures for the same year indicate that maternal mortality in Bo district has decreased to 351 per 100,000 live births, compared to 890 per 100,000 in the rest of the country, a 61 percent reduction. MSF is the only emergency obstetric care provider in Kabezi and Bo.

Sierra Leone and Burundi both suffer from extremely high maternal mortality rates due to lack of access to quality antenatal and obstetric care, which are linked to shortages of qualified health staff, a lack of medical facilities, and health systems that have been shattered by years of civil war.

“Giving birth in Sierra Leone is often a life-threatening endeavor for many women,” said Betty Raney, an obstetrician with MSF in Sierra Leone. “In my 25 years as an obstetrician, I have never seen such a level of severity among the patients. Had they not had any access to care, many of them would die.”

Using the United Nations Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of reducing maternal mortality by 75 percent by 2015 as a point of reference, MSF’s estimates indicate that the maternal mortality ratio in Kabezi is already below the MDG level. MSF is confident that the mortality ratio will have dropped by 75 percent in Bo by 2015.

Photo: Mateso Emilienne, 25, was picked up by MSF ambulance the previous day from Gatumba Health Center. Her baby was delivered via Caesarean section. Burundi 2012 © Sarah Elliott
Low-Cost Health Interventions Drastically Reducing Maternal Mortality in Sierra Leone and Burundi
Medical data gathered in 2011 from MSF projects in Bo, Sierra Leone, and Kabezi,Burundi indicate that the introduction of ambulance referral systems, together with the provision of emergency obstetric services, can significantly reduce the risk of women dying from pregnancy-related complications.
“You do not need state-of-the-art facilities or equipment to save many women’s lives,” said Vincent Lambert, MSF’s medical advisor for Burundi. “MSF’s experience can serve as an encouraging example for donors, governments and other NGOs considering investing in the improvement of access to emergency obstetric care in countries with high maternal mortality rates.”
The research, published in the paper, “Safe Delivery: Reducing maternal mortality in Sierra Leone and Burundi,” is the first of its kind to quantify the impact of such a model of care on maternal mortality in an African setting.

Photo: Mateso Emilienne, 25, was picked up by MSF ambulance the previous day from Gatumba Health Center. Her baby was delivered via Caesarean section. Burundi 2012 © Sarah Elliott

Low-Cost Health Interventions Drastically Reducing Maternal Mortality in Sierra Leone and Burundi


Medical data gathered in 2011 from MSF projects in Bo, Sierra Leone, and Kabezi,Burundi indicate that the introduction of ambulance referral systems, together with the provision of emergency obstetric services, can significantly reduce the risk of women dying from pregnancy-related complications.

“You do not need state-of-the-art facilities or equipment to save many women’s lives,” said Vincent Lambert, MSF’s medical advisor for Burundi. “MSF’s experience can serve as an encouraging example for donors, governments and other NGOs considering investing in the improvement of access to emergency obstetric care in countries with high maternal mortality rates.”

The research, published in the paper, “Safe Delivery: Reducing maternal mortality in Sierra Leone and Burundi,” is the first of its kind to quantify the impact of such a model of care on maternal mortality in an African setting.

This kind of project ensures better monitoring of patients, and it is possible to do research to improve treatment. The objective is to operate on 350 women per year for three years. This time frame should allow us to train three Burundi surgeons, and to transfer our activities to the Ministry of Health.
Geert Morren, a surgeon and fistula specialist at MSF who has operated on many of the fistula patients in Gitega, Burundi. Today is International Women’s Day and MSF will be holding a 2-day workshop in Geneva to improve the management of fistulas.
A child being tested with the malaria rapid blood test at the MSF Hospital of Ngozi. Northern Burundi has been grappling with an increased number of malaria patients since the start of the year. 
Burundi 2010 © Martina Bacigalupo 
More about MSF’s work against malaria »

A child being tested with the malaria rapid blood test at the MSF Hospital of Ngozi. Northern Burundi has been grappling with an increased number of malaria patients since the start of the year.

Burundi 2010 © Martina Bacigalupo

More about MSF’s work against malaria »

"The first of many women I photographed at the medical clinic for rape victims." — photographer Tom Craig. Craig traveled to Burundi with author Tracy Chevalier; their story and images are included in Writing On The Edge.
Burundi © Tom Craig

"The first of many women I photographed at the medical clinic for rape victims." — photographer Tom Craig. Craig traveled to Burundi with author Tracy Chevalier; their story and images are included in Writing On The Edge.

Burundi © Tom Craig
International Women’s Day: Women around the world face exclusion from health care; read A Girl Named Good News about an MSF program in Burundi.
Photo: Burundi 2010 © Sune Juul-Sorensen/MSF

International Women’s Day: Women around the world face exclusion from health care; read A Girl Named Good News about an MSF program in Burundi.

Photo: Burundi 2010 © Sune Juul-Sorensen/MSF