Posts tagged bomb

From the series MSF in 2013:
“While we are treating an increasing number of patients … many more people cannot even make it to the hospitals … That’s why we want to go beyond our hospital walls and reach out to some of these isolated communities.”—Benoit De Gryse, Doctors Without Borders country representative in AfghanistanA three-year-old boy and his two-year-old sister injured in a bomb explosion were treated in MSF’s emergency room at Boost Hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Photo © Francois Dumont

From the series MSF in 2013:

“While we are treating an increasing number of patients … many more people cannot even make it to the hospitals … That’s why we want to go beyond our hospital walls and reach out to some of these isolated communities.”
—Benoit De Gryse, Doctors Without Borders country representative in Afghanistan
A three-year-old boy and his two-year-old sister injured in a bomb explosion were treated in MSF’s emergency room at Boost Hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Photo © Francois Dumont

Photo: An MSF vehicle enters the front gate of the MSF trauma hospital in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, November 29, 2011. Afghanistan 2011 © Michael Goldfarb
MSF Treats Victims of Kunduz Bomb Blast
Five people were dead on arrival and two others died during surgery. Of the 17 people treated by MSF, 11 suffered life-threatening injuries and were in critical condition. Almost all of the patients sustained blast-related injuries including fractures, head trauma, and abdominal and chest injuries requiring specialized trauma surgery.
“People rushed to the hospital after the explosion, seeking information and inquiring about their families and relatives, which is understandable,” said Aurelien Marechal, MSF Field Coordinator in Kunduz. “However, the hospital grounds were crowded, so we had to temporarily close the entrance in order to give space to the medical staff to provide urgent treatment.”
By launching a “multiple casualty plan,” which classifies patients according to the severity of their injuries, the medical team was able to identify and respond to the patients requiring immediate attention.
MSF has been running the surgical hospital in Kunduz since August 2011, providing emergency surgery and follow-up treatment for people wounded in conflict and for those suffering from other life-threatening injuries. A total of 10,000 people were treated in 2012.
In all locations where MSF works in Afghanistan, a strict no-weapons policy is implemented to ensure the safety and security of patients.
“No matter what is going on outside its gates, the hospital needs to remain a safe place for doctors to work and patients to receive lifesaving treatment,” said Marechal.

Photo: An MSF vehicle enters the front gate of the MSF trauma hospital in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, November 29, 2011. Afghanistan 2011 © Michael Goldfarb

MSF Treats Victims of Kunduz Bomb Blast

Five people were dead on arrival and two others died during surgery. Of the 17 people treated by MSF, 11 suffered life-threatening injuries and were in critical condition. Almost all of the patients sustained blast-related injuries including fractures, head trauma, and abdominal and chest injuries requiring specialized trauma surgery.

“People rushed to the hospital after the explosion, seeking information and inquiring about their families and relatives, which is understandable,” said Aurelien Marechal, MSF Field Coordinator in Kunduz. “However, the hospital grounds were crowded, so we had to temporarily close the entrance in order to give space to the medical staff to provide urgent treatment.”

By launching a “multiple casualty plan,” which classifies patients according to the severity of their injuries, the medical team was able to identify and respond to the patients requiring immediate attention.

MSF has been running the surgical hospital in Kunduz since August 2011, providing emergency surgery and follow-up treatment for people wounded in conflict and for those suffering from other life-threatening injuries. A total of 10,000 people were treated in 2012.

In all locations where MSF works in Afghanistan, a strict no-weapons policy is implemented to ensure the safety and security of patients.

“No matter what is going on outside its gates, the hospital needs to remain a safe place for doctors to work and patients to receive lifesaving treatment,” said Marechal.

Photo: Syria’s Idlib Governorate. 2012 © Google
MSF Treats 44 Wounded in Bomb and Rocket Attacks in Northwestern Syria
After aerial bombs and a rocket struck localities in the west of Syria’s Idlib governorate, 44 wounded patients received emergency treatment in a field hospital operated by the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) on January 15.
Thirty-six wounded patients arrived early in the afternoon, after several barrels of explosives were dropped on a village, with one landing close to a bakery. One patient died of her wounds while being evacuated to Turkey.“Most of the patients we received were men, women, and children wounded by debris or metal fragments from the explosions,” said Marie-Christine Férir, MSF emergency program manager and nurse, who was on site and helped treat the wounded. “There were also people with eye wounds and one with an open fracture, who went into surgery. A little girl who suffered a skull trauma died while being transferred to Turkey.”
Later on January 15, MSF’s field hospital received eight more patients injured by a rocket in another location, four of whom were dead on arrival.
The mountainous region of Jabal Al-Akrad, east of the city of Latakia, has been under almost daily bombings for months. While most residents have left the area, those who remain live in constant fear of the barrels of explosives that are dropped by Syrian Army helicopters.
“Apart from the people wounded in the conflict, we continue to see an increasing need for medical care,” Férir said. “We treat around 500 patients every week, including for respiratory diseases and chronic illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes. We are also assisting more women to give birth safely. The health system in Jabal Al-Akrad’s mountainous region collapsed around two years ago. Now the winter cold and snow are reaching the region and medical needs are growing.”
MSF is working in three hospitals in northern and northwestern Syria in areas controlled by armed opposition groups. On January 13, another MSF hospital treated 20 wounded patients, including five children, after a market was bombed in the town of Azaz, in Aleppo governorate.

Photo: Syria’s Idlib Governorate. 2012 © Google

MSF Treats 44 Wounded in Bomb and Rocket Attacks in Northwestern Syria

After aerial bombs and a rocket struck localities in the west of Syria’s Idlib governorate, 44 wounded patients received emergency treatment in a field hospital operated by the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) on January 15.

Thirty-six wounded patients arrived early in the afternoon, after several barrels of explosives were dropped on a village, with one landing close to a bakery. One patient died of her wounds while being evacuated to Turkey.

“Most of the patients we received were men, women, and children wounded by debris or metal fragments from the explosions,” said Marie-Christine Férir, MSF emergency program manager and nurse, who was on site and helped treat the wounded. “There were also people with eye wounds and one with an open fracture, who went into surgery. A little girl who suffered a skull trauma died while being transferred to Turkey.”

Later on January 15, MSF’s field hospital received eight more patients injured by a rocket in another location, four of whom were dead on arrival.

The mountainous region of Jabal Al-Akrad, east of the city of Latakia, has been under almost daily bombings for months. While most residents have left the area, those who remain live in constant fear of the barrels of explosives that are dropped by Syrian Army helicopters.

“Apart from the people wounded in the conflict, we continue to see an increasing need for medical care,” Férir said. “We treat around 500 patients every week, including for respiratory diseases and chronic illnesses such as hypertension and diabetes. We are also assisting more women to give birth safely. The health system in Jabal Al-Akrad’s mountainous region collapsed around two years ago. Now the winter cold and snow are reaching the region and medical needs are growing.”

MSF is working in three hospitals in northern and northwestern Syria in areas controlled by armed opposition groups. On January 13, another MSF hospital treated 20 wounded patients, including five children, after a market was bombed in the town of Azaz, in Aleppo governorate.

Upon spotting the family on the road, we left our vehicles and approached to see how they were doing. The nurse in our team did a quick check to see if they were injured or unwell and, fortunately, they seemed to be physically fine. We asked them where they were coming from, about what had happened. They told us that their village had been bombed.
When Imran meets a family of refugees on the road with a newborn baby he finds himself questioning his decisions. Read his blog post and ask yourself “What would I do?” You can leave comments for Imran below his blog post.