Posts tagged baby

Photo by Haroon Khan/MSF
MSF medical staff tend to a young patient in Karachi, Pakistan. The MSF clinic in Karachi provides basic health care and emergency services, including maternal healthcare, to people living in Machar Colony, a densely populated area that suffers from a lack of sanitation, high pollution, and few affordable health services.

Photo by Haroon Khan/MSF

MSF medical staff tend to a young patient in Karachi, Pakistan. The MSF clinic in Karachi provides basic health care and emergency services, including maternal healthcare, to people living in Machar Colony, a densely populated area that suffers from a lack of sanitation, high pollution, and few affordable health services.

From the series MSF in 2013:
“Traveling from village to village, we hear just one word: measles. People are frightened and hopeless. They’re asking for help.”— Nathalie Gielen, Doctors Without Borders team manager
An MSF doctor examines a child being treated for measles in Province Orientale, DRC. Photo © Tristan Pfund

From the series MSF in 2013:

“Traveling from village to village, we hear just one word: measles. People are frightened and hopeless. They’re asking for help.”
— Nathalie Gielen, Doctors Without Borders team manager

An MSF doctor examines a child being treated for measles in Province Orientale, DRC. Photo © Tristan Pfund

From the series MSF in 2013:
“We sent mobile clinics out to reach people who’d fled into the bush, where terrible conditions and lack of food made malnutrition a huge problem. Even though we were a small team we saved a lot of children’s lives that way.”— Dr. Yolaine Civil, Doctors Without Borders pediatrician in Central African Republic (CAR)MSF staff weigh a baby to check for malnutrition at a mobile clinic near Bossangoa, CAR. Photo © Ton Koene

From the series MSF in 2013:

“We sent mobile clinics out to reach people who’d fled into the bush, where terrible conditions and lack of food made malnutrition a huge problem. Even though we were a small team we saved a lot of children’s lives that way.”
— Dr. Yolaine Civil, Doctors Without Borders pediatrician in Central African Republic (CAR)
MSF staff weigh a baby to check for malnutrition at a mobile clinic near Bossangoa, CAR. Photo © Ton Koene

From the series MSF in 2013:
“We land in the bush with boxes of medicines, plastic sheeting and two stakes to provide a little shade and we go about our work with just the basics … [treating] people with serious infections, malnourished children, pregnant women with infections, and the list goes on.”—Caroline Scholtes, Doctors Without Borders nurse in South Sudan
MSF nurse Caroline Scholtes examines a baby during an MSF mobile clinic in Dorain, Jonglei State, South Sudan. Photo © Caroline Scholtes/MSF

From the series MSF in 2013:

“We land in the bush with boxes of medicines, plastic sheeting and two stakes to provide a little shade and we go about our work with just the basics … [treating] people with serious infections, malnourished children, pregnant women with infections, and the list goes on.”
—Caroline Scholtes, Doctors Without Borders nurse in South Sudan

MSF nurse Caroline Scholtes examines a baby during an MSF mobile clinic in Dorain, Jonglei State, South Sudan. Photo © Caroline Scholtes/MSF

Photo by Lynsey Addario/VII
A woman waits to be transported to the MSF hospital to have her second c-section in Bo, Sierra Leone.
A doctor blogs from the same hospital about a different patient: “She had delivered this baby at home over 36 hours before. The baby was doing well but she had not delivered the placenta and had started hemorrhaging. She had to walk an hour and a half to the nearest clinic to get an ambulance to take her to the hospital. When she arrived she was only semi-conscious, covered in blood, and her hemoglobin was only 3.1.” Read blog- http://msf.me/19GFsSo

Photo by Lynsey Addario/VII

A woman waits to be transported to the MSF hospital to have her second c-section in Bo, Sierra Leone.

A doctor blogs from the same hospital about a different patient: “She had delivered this baby at home over 36 hours before. The baby was doing well but she had not delivered the placenta and had started hemorrhaging. She had to walk an hour and a half to the nearest clinic to get an ambulance to take her to the hospital. When she arrived she was only semi-conscious, covered in blood, and her hemoglobin was only 3.1.” Read blog- http://msf.me/19GFsSo

Photo by Marcus Bleasdale18-month-old Asifiwe and her mother have been fleeing violence in Kibabi, Democratic Republic of Congo, for weeks, and the child has become severely malnourished. She was able to receive urgently needed nutrition treatment at an MSF mobile clinic. Medical teams go to Kibabi every week or two when security allows.

Photo by Marcus Bleasdale
18-month-old Asifiwe and her mother have been fleeing violence in Kibabi, Democratic Republic of Congo, for weeks, and the child has become severely malnourished. She was able to receive urgently needed nutrition treatment at an MSF mobile clinic. Medical teams go to Kibabi every week or two when security allows.

Photo: Jeannine Ntunzwenimana holds her newborn baby. Burundi 2012 © Sarah ElliottMSF @ Instagram
Jeannine Ntunzwenimana, 20, was seven months pregnant when her water broke. “This is my second child, my first is three years and six months old. My first pregnancy was by c-section at the MSF hospital. My water broke early, I was very affraid because it was too soon. I went to the nearest health centre at Gitaza. It was one and a half hour walk away. An ambulance from MSF came to pick me up. The health centre called them because they said they weren’t able to help the baby. If MSF was not here, I could’ve died and my baby too. The way they welcome us is very different to other places.” Jeannine named her daughter Fridatienne Itangakubuntu who weighed 1.3 kilos when she was born two weeks ago. MSF has worked in Burundi since 1992. 
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Photo: Jeannine Ntunzwenimana holds her newborn baby. Burundi 2012 © Sarah Elliott

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Jeannine Ntunzwenimana, 20, was seven months pregnant when her water broke. “This is my second child, my first is three years and six months old. My first pregnancy was by c-section at the MSF hospital. My water broke early, I was very affraid because it was too soon. I went to the nearest health centre at Gitaza. It was one and a half hour walk away. An ambulance from MSF came to pick me up. The health centre called them because they said they weren’t able to help the baby. If MSF was not here, I could’ve died and my baby too. The way they welcome us is very different to other places.” Jeannine named her daughter Fridatienne Itangakubuntu who weighed 1.3 kilos when she was born two weeks ago. MSF has worked in Burundi since 1992. 

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The baby’s foot was injured. The mother had stabilized the little foot with a piece of cardboard from a food package and a dirty cloth. The sight of this hit me. I felt this enormous empathy for the woman who did all she could to help her baby with the small resources she has.
Empathy and coping with violence in Minja’s latest blog post. Please leave your comments and questions for Minja on her blog.
When they attacked, I was outside my compound. I started running, but I was pregnant so did not run fast enough. [The attackers] caught up with me and beat me on the head and I fell down. When I was on the ground, they opened my stomach with knives and my baby fell out. I was eight months pregnant. I have one other child in the hospital. They kicked the head of my child. She was suffering a lot, but now the child has been in the MSF hospital and is better.

17-year-old female patient from Wek (Uror county), treated in Nasir (Upper Nile state), March 2012

Ongoing violence in South Sudan’s  Jonglei state   has had a devastating impact on tens of thousands of people, with many forcibly displaced and further cut off from health care due to the destruction of medical facilities.  A new MSF report contains harrowing accounts of civilians caught up in attacks on villages.

So I was looking forward to the free movies on the flight from Kigali and Amsterdam. At midnight, there was a call for a doctor as a woman was in labour…
Angie, an MSF doctor, was on her flight home from Democratic Republic of Congo when she was called into duty. Find out how Angie and a team of good samaritans delivered a baby on board. Please leave your questions and comments from Angie in the comments box below her blog post. 
An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Above: Asha Jibril cares for her two-year-old daughter Aziza Haran in the ITFC at MSF’s field hospital in Batil camp. A lack of nutritious food and clean water have left Aziza severely acutely malnourished and severely dehydrated. 

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Above: Asha Jibril cares for her two-year-old daughter Aziza Haran in the ITFC at MSF’s field hospital in Batil camp. A lack of nutritious food and clean water have left Aziza severely acutely malnourished and severely dehydrated.

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.

Photo: South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Above: Two-year-old Lastman Muthko was brought to the MSF field hospital in Doro camp earlier this morning by his mother Mariam [left]. He is suffering from severe malaria and has had difficulty breathing.

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.Photo:South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Above: Two-year-old Lastman Muthko was brought to the MSF field hospital in Doro camp earlier this morning by his mother Mariam [left]. He is suffering from severe malaria and has had difficulty breathing.

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.

Photo:South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.Photo: An MSF clinical officer speaks with a woman on her way to MSF’s outpatient department in Batil camp. South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

An Escalating Health Crisis in South Sudan

Since November 2011, MSF has been operating emergency programs in South Sudan for tens of thousands of refugees who fled violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile States. MSF has field hospitals in five refugee camps in Unity and Upper Nile states in South Sudan (Batil, Doro, Jamam, Yida, and Gendrassa). However, resources in the camps are stretched extremely thin, and the humanitarian crisis is only worsening as more refugees arrive. Heavy rains have exacerbated the situation, flooding camps and leaving refugees—many of whom have already endured the journey from Sudan on foot—vulnerable to diseases like diarrhea, malaria, and cholera.

Photo: An MSF clinical officer speaks with a woman on her way to MSF’s outpatient department in Batil camp.
South Sudan 2012 © Nichole Sobecki

MSF Blogs: Triage Among Thousands of New Refugees

We were trying to triage everyone as they were coming off the truck, identifying the sickest and taking them to our clinical staff at the newly erected MSF clinic at T3. This is our name for the transit point at the junction of the main Jamam-Doro road and the road to KM18. After all the rain and storms of recent days, our contingency plan has kicked in. UNICEF and ACTED are now prioritizing moving all the refugees out of KM18. Each time it rains, the KM18 road becomes impassable and they have to wait for the road to dry.

So MSF has constructed a clinic, pharmacy, and observation tent in a few hours. We are ready with a NFI (non-food item) distribution so that each family can set up new temporary shelter. OXFAM have already constructed latrines and water points. Each time a truck arrives we naturally form a semi-circle around it, the medics at the front and the logisticians at the rear. I’m at the wing, also watching the refugees climbing over the side of the truck.Ruby Siddiqui is an epidemiologist based in the Manson Unit, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s clinical research unit in London, United Kingdom. She is currently working on the refugee crisis in South Sudan. You can read her MSF Field Blog here.

Photo: Between 30,000 and 35,000 new refugees crossed the border from Sudan’s Blue Nile State into South Sudan’s Upper Nile State over a period of three weeks at the end of May and the beginning of June.
South Sudan 2012 © Louise Roland-Gosselin/MSF

MSF Blogs: Triage Among Thousands of New Refugees

We were trying to triage everyone as they were coming off the truck, identifying the sickest and taking them to our clinical staff at the newly erected MSF clinic at T3. This is our name for the transit point at the junction of the main Jamam-Doro road and the road to KM18. After all the rain and storms of recent days, our contingency plan has kicked in. UNICEF and ACTED are now prioritizing moving all the refugees out of KM18. Each time it rains, the KM18 road becomes impassable and they have to wait for the road to dry.

So MSF has constructed a clinic, pharmacy, and observation tent in a few hours. We are ready with a NFI (non-food item) distribution so that each family can set up new temporary shelter. OXFAM have already constructed latrines and water points. Each time a truck arrives we naturally form a semi-circle around it, the medics at the front and the logisticians at the rear. I’m at the wing, also watching the refugees climbing over the side of the truck.

Ruby Siddiqui is an epidemiologist based in the Manson Unit, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)’s clinical research unit in London, United Kingdom. She is currently working on the refugee crisis in South Sudan. You can read her MSF Field Blog here.

Photo: Between 30,000 and 35,000 new refugees crossed the border from Sudan’s Blue Nile State into South Sudan’s Upper Nile State over a period of three weeks at the end of May and the beginning of June.
South Sudan 2012 © Louise Roland-Gosselin/MSF

After being served numerous rounds of tea, one of the nutritional surveyors brought forth a father carrying his tiny child – a baby of 4 weeks, who had been sick with diarrhea for one week, and now looked like an emaciated bird. The father sat on the edge of the pink frilly mattress, and cried while I asked questions about the baby’s illness. The father, speaking fluent French, described how days earlier he had walked 4 hours each way with the baby in search of help from the nearest health centre. The health centre had been closed, and he had returned home with the baby.
Trish Newport is working for MSF as a community outreach nurse in Chad. This is her fifth mission for MSF. When not on mission, she lives and works as a nurse in the Yukon, Canada.

Read from her blog.